Limits...
The effects of introducing an electronic prescription system with no copayments.

Eriksen II, Melberg HO - Health Econ Rev (2015)

Bottom Line: It decreased the average size of each prescription, but it did not decrease the number of consultations.The reduced direct and indirect costs of obtaining prescriptions after the introduction of the electronic prescription system changed the financial incentives facing the patients and physicians.This led to significant changes in the level and size of prescriptions and illustrates the importance of financial incentives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT

Background: To examine the impact of introducing an electronic prescription system with no copayments on the number of prescriptions, the size of prescriptions, and the number of visits and phone calls to primary physicians.

Methods: Fixed regression models using monthly data on per capita prescriptions claims and consultations between 2009 and 2013 at the municipality level, before and after the introduction of the electronic prescription system.

Results: The electronic prescription system with no copayment increased the number of prescriptions by between 6.0 and 8.1 %. It decreased the average size of each prescription, but it did not decrease the number of consultations.

Conclusion: The reduced direct and indirect costs of obtaining prescriptions after the introduction of the electronic prescription system changed the financial incentives facing the patients and physicians. This led to significant changes in the level and size of prescriptions and illustrates the importance of financial incentives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Number of reimbursement claims per capita in counties who introduced electronic prescriptions in 2012 (fully or partially) and counties that did not
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502047&req=5

Fig3: Number of reimbursement claims per capita in counties who introduced electronic prescriptions in 2012 (fully or partially) and counties that did not

Mentions: The average number of prescriptions per capita per month in Norwegian municipalities between January 2008 and March 2013 was 0.08. This is equivalent to about one prescription per year for every person. Figure 3 shows the different trends in the number of total reimbursement claims per capita for counties that introduced the e-prescription in 2012 (fully or partially) and those counties that did not introduce e-prescriptions in 2012.Fig. 3


The effects of introducing an electronic prescription system with no copayments.

Eriksen II, Melberg HO - Health Econ Rev (2015)

Number of reimbursement claims per capita in counties who introduced electronic prescriptions in 2012 (fully or partially) and counties that did not
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4502047&req=5

Fig3: Number of reimbursement claims per capita in counties who introduced electronic prescriptions in 2012 (fully or partially) and counties that did not
Mentions: The average number of prescriptions per capita per month in Norwegian municipalities between January 2008 and March 2013 was 0.08. This is equivalent to about one prescription per year for every person. Figure 3 shows the different trends in the number of total reimbursement claims per capita for counties that introduced the e-prescription in 2012 (fully or partially) and those counties that did not introduce e-prescriptions in 2012.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: It decreased the average size of each prescription, but it did not decrease the number of consultations.The reduced direct and indirect costs of obtaining prescriptions after the introduction of the electronic prescription system changed the financial incentives facing the patients and physicians.This led to significant changes in the level and size of prescriptions and illustrates the importance of financial incentives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT

Background: To examine the impact of introducing an electronic prescription system with no copayments on the number of prescriptions, the size of prescriptions, and the number of visits and phone calls to primary physicians.

Methods: Fixed regression models using monthly data on per capita prescriptions claims and consultations between 2009 and 2013 at the municipality level, before and after the introduction of the electronic prescription system.

Results: The electronic prescription system with no copayment increased the number of prescriptions by between 6.0 and 8.1 %. It decreased the average size of each prescription, but it did not decrease the number of consultations.

Conclusion: The reduced direct and indirect costs of obtaining prescriptions after the introduction of the electronic prescription system changed the financial incentives facing the patients and physicians. This led to significant changes in the level and size of prescriptions and illustrates the importance of financial incentives.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus