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Effect of postural angle on back muscle activities in aging female workers performing computer tasks.

Kamil NS, Dawal SZ - J Phys Ther Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of postural angle on back muscle activity during a computer task in aging women. [Subjects] Seventeen women ≥50 years old participated. [Methods] The participants were instructed to perform computer-related tasks for 20 minutes on a workstation that simulated typical office working conditions.Statistical analysis showed significant correlations between upper trunk angle and cervical erector spinae and longissimus muscle activities.Similarly, pelvic angle was significantly correlated with cervical erector spinae and multifidus muscle activities. [Conclusion] A neutral back posture minimizes muscle activities in aging women performing computer tasks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose] This study investigated the effects of postural angle on back muscle activity during a computer task in aging women. [Subjects] Seventeen women ≥50 years old participated. [Methods] The participants were instructed to perform computer-related tasks for 20 minutes on a workstation that simulated typical office working conditions. Back posture was measured from the measured trunk and pelvic angles. Electromyography activities were recorded simultaneously from the cervical erector spinae, longissimus, and multifidus muscles. [Results] The lowest mean percentages of maximum voluntary contraction for the cervical erector spinae and longissimus muscles were obtained when the upper trunk and pelvic angles were between 0° to -5° from the sagittal plane. The back muscle activities increased as the upper trunk and pelvic angles exceeded 0°. Statistical analysis showed significant correlations between upper trunk angle and cervical erector spinae and longissimus muscle activities. Similarly, pelvic angle was significantly correlated with cervical erector spinae and multifidus muscle activities. [Conclusion] A neutral back posture minimizes muscle activities in aging women performing computer tasks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Positive direction of postural angle
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fig_001: Positive direction of postural angle

Mentions: Back postural angles were measured from the upper trunk and pelvis. Inline 2D inclinometers(Noraxon USA, Inc.) were attached at the T2 level and sacrum by surgical tape to recordmovements in the sagittal plane14); theinclinometer sensors are 3.05 × 3.05 × 3.05 cm and weigh 45.5 g. Bony landmarks wereidentified manually. Back postural angles were measured as reference body postures andduring the experimental tasks. Reference body postures were recorded over 45 seconds bothbefore and after work. The average of the recorded angles was determined and used forcalibration as well as a reference for recording occupational seated back posture. Backpostural angles were recorded continuously during the experimental task. The participantssat on an office chair adjusted to their preferences and comfort. The back postural anglesof each participant during the computer tasks were analyzed in terms of the mean angledeviation from the sagittal plane; a positive value indicates upper trunk flexion andforward pelvic rotation, whereas a negative value indicates upper trunk extension andbackward pelvic rotation. An example of a positive upper trunk and pelvic angle is shown inFig. 1Fig. 1.


Effect of postural angle on back muscle activities in aging female workers performing computer tasks.

Kamil NS, Dawal SZ - J Phys Ther Sci (2015)

Positive direction of postural angle
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4500022&req=5

fig_001: Positive direction of postural angle
Mentions: Back postural angles were measured from the upper trunk and pelvis. Inline 2D inclinometers(Noraxon USA, Inc.) were attached at the T2 level and sacrum by surgical tape to recordmovements in the sagittal plane14); theinclinometer sensors are 3.05 × 3.05 × 3.05 cm and weigh 45.5 g. Bony landmarks wereidentified manually. Back postural angles were measured as reference body postures andduring the experimental tasks. Reference body postures were recorded over 45 seconds bothbefore and after work. The average of the recorded angles was determined and used forcalibration as well as a reference for recording occupational seated back posture. Backpostural angles were recorded continuously during the experimental task. The participantssat on an office chair adjusted to their preferences and comfort. The back postural anglesof each participant during the computer tasks were analyzed in terms of the mean angledeviation from the sagittal plane; a positive value indicates upper trunk flexion andforward pelvic rotation, whereas a negative value indicates upper trunk extension andbackward pelvic rotation. An example of a positive upper trunk and pelvic angle is shown inFig. 1Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of postural angle on back muscle activity during a computer task in aging women. [Subjects] Seventeen women ≥50 years old participated. [Methods] The participants were instructed to perform computer-related tasks for 20 minutes on a workstation that simulated typical office working conditions.Statistical analysis showed significant correlations between upper trunk angle and cervical erector spinae and longissimus muscle activities.Similarly, pelvic angle was significantly correlated with cervical erector spinae and multifidus muscle activities. [Conclusion] A neutral back posture minimizes muscle activities in aging women performing computer tasks.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose] This study investigated the effects of postural angle on back muscle activity during a computer task in aging women. [Subjects] Seventeen women ≥50 years old participated. [Methods] The participants were instructed to perform computer-related tasks for 20 minutes on a workstation that simulated typical office working conditions. Back posture was measured from the measured trunk and pelvic angles. Electromyography activities were recorded simultaneously from the cervical erector spinae, longissimus, and multifidus muscles. [Results] The lowest mean percentages of maximum voluntary contraction for the cervical erector spinae and longissimus muscles were obtained when the upper trunk and pelvic angles were between 0° to -5° from the sagittal plane. The back muscle activities increased as the upper trunk and pelvic angles exceeded 0°. Statistical analysis showed significant correlations between upper trunk angle and cervical erector spinae and longissimus muscle activities. Similarly, pelvic angle was significantly correlated with cervical erector spinae and multifidus muscle activities. [Conclusion] A neutral back posture minimizes muscle activities in aging women performing computer tasks.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus