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Differences in two-point discrimination and sensory threshold in the blind between braille and text reading: a pilot study.

Noh JW, Park BS, Kim MY, Lee LK, Yang SM, Lee WD, Shin YS, Kang JH, Kim JH, Lee JU, Kwak TY, Lee TH, Kim JY, Kim J - J Phys Ther Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: We measured tactile sensory and electrical thresholds using the TPD method and a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator. [Results] The left palm TPD values were significantly different between the groups.The values of the electrical sensory threshold in the left hand, the electrical pain threshold in the left hand, and the electrical pain threshold in the right hand were significantly lower in the Braille group than in the text group. [Conclusion] These findings make it difficult to explain the difference in tactility between groups, excluding both palms.However, our data show that using Braille can enhance development of the sensory median nerve in the blind, particularly in terms of the electrical sensory and pain thresholds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Health Science and Nanophysiotherapy, Department of Physical Therapy, Graduate School, Yongin University, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose] This study investigated two-point discrimination (TPD) and the electrical sensory threshold of the blind to define the effect of using Braille on the tactile and electrical senses. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight blind participants were divided equally into a text-reading and a Braille-reading group. We measured tactile sensory and electrical thresholds using the TPD method and a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator. [Results] The left palm TPD values were significantly different between the groups. The values of the electrical sensory threshold in the left hand, the electrical pain threshold in the left hand, and the electrical pain threshold in the right hand were significantly lower in the Braille group than in the text group. [Conclusion] These findings make it difficult to explain the difference in tactility between groups, excluding both palms. However, our data show that using Braille can enhance development of the sensory median nerve in the blind, particularly in terms of the electrical sensory and pain thresholds.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic and photographic representation of the experimental methods used formeasuring threshold. Sensory threshold was determined as described in the Subjects andMethods section. BraR: Braille reading group; TexR: text reading group; +: anode; −:cathode; 2-PD: two-point discrimination; Thm: thumb; IF: index finger; MF: middlefinger; Pal: palm; for a: forearm; Dorh: Dorsal hand
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fig_001: Schematic and photographic representation of the experimental methods used formeasuring threshold. Sensory threshold was determined as described in the Subjects andMethods section. BraR: Braille reading group; TexR: text reading group; +: anode; −:cathode; 2-PD: two-point discrimination; Thm: thumb; IF: index finger; MF: middlefinger; Pal: palm; for a: forearm; Dorh: Dorsal hand

Mentions: Blind individuals develop tactile and auditory senses to replace the sense of sight1, 2).Such “compensatory plasticity” takes place within the visual cortex in response tocross-modal auditory and tactile stimulation1, 3). When reading Braille, the blind use theleft index finger (Fig. 1AFig. 1.


Differences in two-point discrimination and sensory threshold in the blind between braille and text reading: a pilot study.

Noh JW, Park BS, Kim MY, Lee LK, Yang SM, Lee WD, Shin YS, Kang JH, Kim JH, Lee JU, Kwak TY, Lee TH, Kim JY, Kim J - J Phys Ther Sci (2015)

Schematic and photographic representation of the experimental methods used formeasuring threshold. Sensory threshold was determined as described in the Subjects andMethods section. BraR: Braille reading group; TexR: text reading group; +: anode; −:cathode; 2-PD: two-point discrimination; Thm: thumb; IF: index finger; MF: middlefinger; Pal: palm; for a: forearm; Dorh: Dorsal hand
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4500011&req=5

fig_001: Schematic and photographic representation of the experimental methods used formeasuring threshold. Sensory threshold was determined as described in the Subjects andMethods section. BraR: Braille reading group; TexR: text reading group; +: anode; −:cathode; 2-PD: two-point discrimination; Thm: thumb; IF: index finger; MF: middlefinger; Pal: palm; for a: forearm; Dorh: Dorsal hand
Mentions: Blind individuals develop tactile and auditory senses to replace the sense of sight1, 2).Such “compensatory plasticity” takes place within the visual cortex in response tocross-modal auditory and tactile stimulation1, 3). When reading Braille, the blind use theleft index finger (Fig. 1AFig. 1.

Bottom Line: We measured tactile sensory and electrical thresholds using the TPD method and a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator. [Results] The left palm TPD values were significantly different between the groups.The values of the electrical sensory threshold in the left hand, the electrical pain threshold in the left hand, and the electrical pain threshold in the right hand were significantly lower in the Braille group than in the text group. [Conclusion] These findings make it difficult to explain the difference in tactility between groups, excluding both palms.However, our data show that using Braille can enhance development of the sensory median nerve in the blind, particularly in terms of the electrical sensory and pain thresholds.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratory of Health Science and Nanophysiotherapy, Department of Physical Therapy, Graduate School, Yongin University, Republic of Korea.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose] This study investigated two-point discrimination (TPD) and the electrical sensory threshold of the blind to define the effect of using Braille on the tactile and electrical senses. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight blind participants were divided equally into a text-reading and a Braille-reading group. We measured tactile sensory and electrical thresholds using the TPD method and a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator. [Results] The left palm TPD values were significantly different between the groups. The values of the electrical sensory threshold in the left hand, the electrical pain threshold in the left hand, and the electrical pain threshold in the right hand were significantly lower in the Braille group than in the text group. [Conclusion] These findings make it difficult to explain the difference in tactility between groups, excluding both palms. However, our data show that using Braille can enhance development of the sensory median nerve in the blind, particularly in terms of the electrical sensory and pain thresholds.

No MeSH data available.