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Relationship between navicular drop and measuring position of maximal plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints.

Saeki J, Tojima M, Torii S - J Phys Ther Sci (2015)

Bottom Line: [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Subjects] Ten healthy young men participated in this study. [Methods] The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was calculated to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Results] Significant negative correlations were observed between navicular drop and plantar flexion torques in the lengthened position of the intrinsic toe plantar flexion muscles, but no correlations were found between navicular drop and plantar flexion torques in the neutral position of the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joints.Moreover, the intrinsic toe plantar flexion muscles were found to contribute to the formation of the medial longitudinal arch. [Conclusion] Navicular drop correlates with metatarsophalangeal joint muscle strength in plantar flexion where the intrinsic toe muscles are capable of exerting force.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Japan.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Subjects] Ten healthy young men participated in this study. [Methods] The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was calculated to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Results] Significant negative correlations were observed between navicular drop and plantar flexion torques in the lengthened position of the intrinsic toe plantar flexion muscles, but no correlations were found between navicular drop and plantar flexion torques in the neutral position of the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joints. Moreover, the intrinsic toe plantar flexion muscles were found to contribute to the formation of the medial longitudinal arch. [Conclusion] Navicular drop correlates with metatarsophalangeal joint muscle strength in plantar flexion where the intrinsic toe muscles are capable of exerting force.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Structure of the torque meter used to measure isometric plantar flexion torque at themetatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints. MTP joint plantar flexion torque was calculatedusing the following formula: plantar flexion torque (Nm) = strain ε (N) × moment arm0.10 (m).
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fig_001: Structure of the torque meter used to measure isometric plantar flexion torque at themetatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints. MTP joint plantar flexion torque was calculatedusing the following formula: plantar flexion torque (Nm) = strain ε (N) × moment arm0.10 (m).

Mentions: A custom-made MTP joint plantar flexion torque meter device was used to measure MTP jointplantar flexion torque. The subjects were seated on a chair, with their trunk, thighs, lowerthighs, and dominant foot fastened to the chair and the torque meter device. After warmingup, each subject performed maximal voluntary isometric contraction of plantar flexion of thefirst MTP joint, followed by that of the second-fifth MTP joint for 3 s to determine themaximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The plantar flexion torque was calculated as thetensile force of a strain gauge (TU-BR 500N, TEAC, Japan) multiplied by the 0.10-m lever armof the force plate (Fig. 1Fig. 1.


Relationship between navicular drop and measuring position of maximal plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints.

Saeki J, Tojima M, Torii S - J Phys Ther Sci (2015)

Structure of the torque meter used to measure isometric plantar flexion torque at themetatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints. MTP joint plantar flexion torque was calculatedusing the following formula: plantar flexion torque (Nm) = strain ε (N) × moment arm0.10 (m).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499986&req=5

fig_001: Structure of the torque meter used to measure isometric plantar flexion torque at themetatarsophalangeal (MTP) joints. MTP joint plantar flexion torque was calculatedusing the following formula: plantar flexion torque (Nm) = strain ε (N) × moment arm0.10 (m).
Mentions: A custom-made MTP joint plantar flexion torque meter device was used to measure MTP jointplantar flexion torque. The subjects were seated on a chair, with their trunk, thighs, lowerthighs, and dominant foot fastened to the chair and the torque meter device. After warmingup, each subject performed maximal voluntary isometric contraction of plantar flexion of thefirst MTP joint, followed by that of the second-fifth MTP joint for 3 s to determine themaximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torque. The plantar flexion torque was calculated as thetensile force of a strain gauge (TU-BR 500N, TEAC, Japan) multiplied by the 0.10-m lever armof the force plate (Fig. 1Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Subjects] Ten healthy young men participated in this study. [Methods] The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was calculated to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Results] Significant negative correlations were observed between navicular drop and plantar flexion torques in the lengthened position of the intrinsic toe plantar flexion muscles, but no correlations were found between navicular drop and plantar flexion torques in the neutral position of the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joints.Moreover, the intrinsic toe plantar flexion muscles were found to contribute to the formation of the medial longitudinal arch. [Conclusion] Navicular drop correlates with metatarsophalangeal joint muscle strength in plantar flexion where the intrinsic toe muscles are capable of exerting force.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Sport Sciences, Waseda University, Japan.

ABSTRACT
[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Subjects] Ten healthy young men participated in this study. [Methods] The Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was calculated to determine the relationship between navicular drop and plantar flexion torque of the first and second-fifth metatarsophalangeal joints. [Results] Significant negative correlations were observed between navicular drop and plantar flexion torques in the lengthened position of the intrinsic toe plantar flexion muscles, but no correlations were found between navicular drop and plantar flexion torques in the neutral position of the ankle and metatarsophalangeal joints. Moreover, the intrinsic toe plantar flexion muscles were found to contribute to the formation of the medial longitudinal arch. [Conclusion] Navicular drop correlates with metatarsophalangeal joint muscle strength in plantar flexion where the intrinsic toe muscles are capable of exerting force.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus