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Monitoring and assessing the quality of care for youth: developing an audit tool using an expert consensus approach.

Puszka S, Nagel T, Matthews V, Mosca D, Piovesan R, Nori A, Bailie R - Int J Ment Health Syst (2015)

Bottom Line: Audit items comprise key measures of processes and outcomes of care for Indigenous youth, as determined by the expert reference group.Pilot testing and user feedback highlighted the importance of feasibility and context-specific considerations in tool development and design.The youth health audit tool provides a first step in monitoring, assessing and improving the way Indigenous primary healthcare services engage with and respond to the needs of youth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Menzies School of Health Research, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, NT 0810 Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: The mental health needs of young people are often inadequately met by health services. Quality improvement approaches provide a framework for measuring, assessing and improving the quality of healthcare. However, a lack of performance standards and measurement tools are an impediment to their implementation. This paper reports on the initial stages of development of a clinical audit tool for assessing the quality of primary healthcare for Australian Indigenous youth aged 12-24 including mental health services provided within primary care.

Methods: Audit items were determined through review of relevant guidelines, expert reference group consensus opinion and specific inclusion criteria. Pilot testing was undertaken at four Indigenous primary healthcare services. A focus group discussion involving five staff from a health service participating in pilot testing explored user experiences of the tool.

Results: Audit items comprise key measures of processes and outcomes of care for Indigenous youth, as determined by the expert reference group. Gaps and conflicts in relevant guidelines and a lack of agreed performance indicators necessitated a tool development process that relied heavily on expert reference group advice and audit item inclusion criteria. Pilot testing and user feedback highlighted the importance of feasibility and context-specific considerations in tool development and design.

Conclusions: The youth health audit tool provides a first step in monitoring, assessing and improving the way Indigenous primary healthcare services engage with and respond to the needs of youth. Our approach offers a way forward for further development of quality measures in the absence of clearly articulated standards of care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

One21seventy quality improvement cycle.
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Fig1: One21seventy quality improvement cycle.

Mentions: Modern continuous quality improvement uses objective information to analyse and improve health systems, processes and outcomes [13, 14]. Through our Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease projects, we have used a quality improvement approach to develop tools and processes to facilitate cycles of feedback reports and workshops, goal setting, action planning and implementation of systems changes within Indigenous primary healthcare services (Figure 1) [15]. Over 230 Indigenous health centres across Australia have participated in evidence-based quality improvement processes under the auspices of One21seventy—the National Centre for Quality Improvement in Indigenous Primary Health Care. The One21seventy approach to quality improvement has been reported elsewhere [16–18].Figure 1


Monitoring and assessing the quality of care for youth: developing an audit tool using an expert consensus approach.

Puszka S, Nagel T, Matthews V, Mosca D, Piovesan R, Nori A, Bailie R - Int J Ment Health Syst (2015)

One21seventy quality improvement cycle.
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499912&req=5

Fig1: One21seventy quality improvement cycle.
Mentions: Modern continuous quality improvement uses objective information to analyse and improve health systems, processes and outcomes [13, 14]. Through our Audit and Best Practice for Chronic Disease projects, we have used a quality improvement approach to develop tools and processes to facilitate cycles of feedback reports and workshops, goal setting, action planning and implementation of systems changes within Indigenous primary healthcare services (Figure 1) [15]. Over 230 Indigenous health centres across Australia have participated in evidence-based quality improvement processes under the auspices of One21seventy—the National Centre for Quality Improvement in Indigenous Primary Health Care. The One21seventy approach to quality improvement has been reported elsewhere [16–18].Figure 1

Bottom Line: Audit items comprise key measures of processes and outcomes of care for Indigenous youth, as determined by the expert reference group.Pilot testing and user feedback highlighted the importance of feasibility and context-specific considerations in tool development and design.The youth health audit tool provides a first step in monitoring, assessing and improving the way Indigenous primary healthcare services engage with and respond to the needs of youth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Menzies School of Health Research, PO Box 41096, Casuarina, NT 0810 Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: The mental health needs of young people are often inadequately met by health services. Quality improvement approaches provide a framework for measuring, assessing and improving the quality of healthcare. However, a lack of performance standards and measurement tools are an impediment to their implementation. This paper reports on the initial stages of development of a clinical audit tool for assessing the quality of primary healthcare for Australian Indigenous youth aged 12-24 including mental health services provided within primary care.

Methods: Audit items were determined through review of relevant guidelines, expert reference group consensus opinion and specific inclusion criteria. Pilot testing was undertaken at four Indigenous primary healthcare services. A focus group discussion involving five staff from a health service participating in pilot testing explored user experiences of the tool.

Results: Audit items comprise key measures of processes and outcomes of care for Indigenous youth, as determined by the expert reference group. Gaps and conflicts in relevant guidelines and a lack of agreed performance indicators necessitated a tool development process that relied heavily on expert reference group advice and audit item inclusion criteria. Pilot testing and user feedback highlighted the importance of feasibility and context-specific considerations in tool development and design.

Conclusions: The youth health audit tool provides a first step in monitoring, assessing and improving the way Indigenous primary healthcare services engage with and respond to the needs of youth. Our approach offers a way forward for further development of quality measures in the absence of clearly articulated standards of care.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus