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Evaluation of farm-level parameters derived from animal movements for use in risk-based surveillance programmes of cattle in Switzerland.

Schärrer S, Widgren S, Schwermer H, Lindberg A, Vidondo B, Zinsstag J, Reist M - BMC Vet. Res. (2015)

Bottom Line: Validation of the scores against results from the BVD surveillance programme 2013 gave promising results for setting the cut off for each of the five selected farm level criteria at the 50th percentile.Restricting testing to farms with a score ≥ 2 would have resulted in the same number of detected BVD positive farms as testing all farms, i.e., the outcome of the 2013 surveillance programme could have been reached with a smaller survey.The proposed method is a promising framework for the selection of farms according to the risk of infection based on animal movements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Public Health Institute (VPHI), Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. sara.schaerrer@vetsuisse.unibe.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study focused on the descriptive analysis of cattle movements and farm-level parameters derived from cattle movements, which are considered to be generically suitable for risk-based surveillance systems in Switzerland for diseases where animal movements constitute an important risk pathway.

Methods: A framework was developed to select farms for surveillance based on a risk score summarizing 5 parameters. The proposed framework was validated using data from the bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) surveillance programme in 2013.

Results: A cumulative score was calculated per farm, including the following parameters; the maximum monthly ingoing contact chain (in 2012), the average number of animals per incoming movement, use of mixed alpine pastures and the number of weeks in 2012 a farm had movements registered. The final score for the farm depended on the distribution of the parameters. Different cut offs; 50, 90, 95 and 99%, were explored. The final scores ranged between 0 and 5. Validation of the scores against results from the BVD surveillance programme 2013 gave promising results for setting the cut off for each of the five selected farm level criteria at the 50th percentile. Restricting testing to farms with a score ≥ 2 would have resulted in the same number of detected BVD positive farms as testing all farms, i.e., the outcome of the 2013 surveillance programme could have been reached with a smaller survey.

Conclusions: The seasonality and time dependency of the activity of single farms in the networks requires a careful assessment of the actual time period included to determine farm level criteria. However, selecting farms in the sample for risk-based surveillance can be optimized with the proposed scoring system. The system was validated using data from the BVD eradication program. The proposed method is a promising framework for the selection of farms according to the risk of infection based on animal movements.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The January cohort followed over one year. The proportion expresses how many cattle were still in the same herd on the 1st of every month in 2012. Over the summer month, the proportion of animals leaving the herd increases because entire herds are moved to summer pasture. The increase of bovines originally in the herd in October is due to cattle returning from summer pasture
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Fig2: The January cohort followed over one year. The proportion expresses how many cattle were still in the same herd on the 1st of every month in 2012. Over the summer month, the proportion of animals leaving the herd increases because entire herds are moved to summer pasture. The increase of bovines originally in the herd in October is due to cattle returning from summer pasture

Mentions: About 75 % of the cattle born before January 1st 2012 stayed in the same herd, while one fourth had been moved by the end of the year. Over the summer months, the proportion of animals leaving the herd increases because entire herds are moved to summer pasture. The increase in October (Fig. 2) is due to cattle returning from summer pasture.Fig. 2


Evaluation of farm-level parameters derived from animal movements for use in risk-based surveillance programmes of cattle in Switzerland.

Schärrer S, Widgren S, Schwermer H, Lindberg A, Vidondo B, Zinsstag J, Reist M - BMC Vet. Res. (2015)

The January cohort followed over one year. The proportion expresses how many cattle were still in the same herd on the 1st of every month in 2012. Over the summer month, the proportion of animals leaving the herd increases because entire herds are moved to summer pasture. The increase of bovines originally in the herd in October is due to cattle returning from summer pasture
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499910&req=5

Fig2: The January cohort followed over one year. The proportion expresses how many cattle were still in the same herd on the 1st of every month in 2012. Over the summer month, the proportion of animals leaving the herd increases because entire herds are moved to summer pasture. The increase of bovines originally in the herd in October is due to cattle returning from summer pasture
Mentions: About 75 % of the cattle born before January 1st 2012 stayed in the same herd, while one fourth had been moved by the end of the year. Over the summer months, the proportion of animals leaving the herd increases because entire herds are moved to summer pasture. The increase in October (Fig. 2) is due to cattle returning from summer pasture.Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Validation of the scores against results from the BVD surveillance programme 2013 gave promising results for setting the cut off for each of the five selected farm level criteria at the 50th percentile.Restricting testing to farms with a score ≥ 2 would have resulted in the same number of detected BVD positive farms as testing all farms, i.e., the outcome of the 2013 surveillance programme could have been reached with a smaller survey.The proposed method is a promising framework for the selection of farms according to the risk of infection based on animal movements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Veterinary Public Health Institute (VPHI), Vetsuisse Faculty, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. sara.schaerrer@vetsuisse.unibe.ch.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study focused on the descriptive analysis of cattle movements and farm-level parameters derived from cattle movements, which are considered to be generically suitable for risk-based surveillance systems in Switzerland for diseases where animal movements constitute an important risk pathway.

Methods: A framework was developed to select farms for surveillance based on a risk score summarizing 5 parameters. The proposed framework was validated using data from the bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) surveillance programme in 2013.

Results: A cumulative score was calculated per farm, including the following parameters; the maximum monthly ingoing contact chain (in 2012), the average number of animals per incoming movement, use of mixed alpine pastures and the number of weeks in 2012 a farm had movements registered. The final score for the farm depended on the distribution of the parameters. Different cut offs; 50, 90, 95 and 99%, were explored. The final scores ranged between 0 and 5. Validation of the scores against results from the BVD surveillance programme 2013 gave promising results for setting the cut off for each of the five selected farm level criteria at the 50th percentile. Restricting testing to farms with a score ≥ 2 would have resulted in the same number of detected BVD positive farms as testing all farms, i.e., the outcome of the 2013 surveillance programme could have been reached with a smaller survey.

Conclusions: The seasonality and time dependency of the activity of single farms in the networks requires a careful assessment of the actual time period included to determine farm level criteria. However, selecting farms in the sample for risk-based surveillance can be optimized with the proposed scoring system. The system was validated using data from the BVD eradication program. The proposed method is a promising framework for the selection of farms according to the risk of infection based on animal movements.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus