Limits...
Honey reduces blood alcohol concentration but not affects the level of serum MDA and GSH-Px activity in intoxicated male mice models.

Shi P, Chen B, Chen C, Xu J, Shen Z, Miao X, Yao H - BMC Complement Altern Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the treatment of 2.19 g/kg honey could decrease significantly the blood ethanol concentration in intoxicated mice.The anti-intoxication activity of honey could be due to the effect of the fructose contained in the honey.Honey indeed possesses anti-intoxication activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine Resource and Bee products, College of Bee Science, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, 350002, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: For a long time, honey was purportedly helpful to prevent drunkenness and relieve hangover symptoms. However, few of the assertions have experienced scientific assessment. The present study examined the effects of honey on intoxicated male mice.

Methods: Low or high doses of lychee flower honey (2.19 or 4.39 g/kg body weight, respectively) were single orally administrated 30 min before the ethanol intoxication of mice, followed by recording the locomotor activity by autonomic activity instrument and observing the climbing ability after alcohol. On the other hand, 2.19 g/kg honey was single orally administrated 5 min after the ethanol intoxication of mice, followed by determining the ethanol concentration in mice blood. In addition, subacute alcoholism mice models were developed and after the treatment of 2.19 g/kg honey s.i.d for successive three days, the level of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity were detected in the models.

Results: Both of the two doses of honey increased the autonomic activity of alcoholized mice. Furthermore, the treatment of 2.19 g/kg honey could decrease significantly the blood ethanol concentration in intoxicated mice. The anti-intoxication activity of honey could be due to the effect of the fructose contained in the honey. Meanwhile, honey could not affect the serum MDA level and GSH-Px activity in alcoholism mice models.

Conclusion: Honey indeed possesses anti-intoxication activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The prevention of honey from drunkenness in mice. T0 group, pretreated by saline 30 min before ethanol; T1 group, pretreated by 2.19 g/kg body weight dose honey at 30 min before alcohol (*p < 0.05, vs. T0, n = 10 per group); T2 group, pretreated by 4.39 g/kg body weight dose honey at 30 min before alcohol; P group, pretreated by 0.195 g /kg body weight dose RU-21 at 30 min before alcohol; C group, pretreated by saline and without administration of alcohol (* p < 0.05, vs. T0); N group, pretreated by 2.19 g/kg body weight dose honey and without administration of alcohol. The data for T0, T1 and C groups represent mean ± SD, and the others represent mean
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499888&req=5

Fig1: The prevention of honey from drunkenness in mice. T0 group, pretreated by saline 30 min before ethanol; T1 group, pretreated by 2.19 g/kg body weight dose honey at 30 min before alcohol (*p < 0.05, vs. T0, n = 10 per group); T2 group, pretreated by 4.39 g/kg body weight dose honey at 30 min before alcohol; P group, pretreated by 0.195 g /kg body weight dose RU-21 at 30 min before alcohol; C group, pretreated by saline and without administration of alcohol (* p < 0.05, vs. T0); N group, pretreated by 2.19 g/kg body weight dose honey and without administration of alcohol. The data for T0, T1 and C groups represent mean ± SD, and the others represent mean

Mentions: As shown in Fig. 1, the locomotor activity of model group (T0 group) is significantly decreased compared with that of normal group (C group) at 40 min after alcohol. It demonstrated that the drunken animal model indeed succeeded. A statistically significant overall effect of low dose honey pretreatment for T1 group (2.19 g/kg BW dose honey) was observed (p < 0.05, vs. T0 group, n = 10 per group) within 60 min after alcohol. The effect was also observed for T2 group (4.39 g/kg BW dose honey) at 20 min and 40 min (p < 0.05, vs. T0 group, n = 10 per group). In addition, the statistically significant effect could be also observed for P group (positive drug, RU-21) at 20 min and 40 min (p = 0.03 and 0.07, respectively, vs. T0 group, n = 10 per group) after ethanol. There were no significant differences between N and C groups.Figure 1


Honey reduces blood alcohol concentration but not affects the level of serum MDA and GSH-Px activity in intoxicated male mice models.

Shi P, Chen B, Chen C, Xu J, Shen Z, Miao X, Yao H - BMC Complement Altern Med (2015)

The prevention of honey from drunkenness in mice. T0 group, pretreated by saline 30 min before ethanol; T1 group, pretreated by 2.19 g/kg body weight dose honey at 30 min before alcohol (*p < 0.05, vs. T0, n = 10 per group); T2 group, pretreated by 4.39 g/kg body weight dose honey at 30 min before alcohol; P group, pretreated by 0.195 g /kg body weight dose RU-21 at 30 min before alcohol; C group, pretreated by saline and without administration of alcohol (* p < 0.05, vs. T0); N group, pretreated by 2.19 g/kg body weight dose honey and without administration of alcohol. The data for T0, T1 and C groups represent mean ± SD, and the others represent mean
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499888&req=5

Fig1: The prevention of honey from drunkenness in mice. T0 group, pretreated by saline 30 min before ethanol; T1 group, pretreated by 2.19 g/kg body weight dose honey at 30 min before alcohol (*p < 0.05, vs. T0, n = 10 per group); T2 group, pretreated by 4.39 g/kg body weight dose honey at 30 min before alcohol; P group, pretreated by 0.195 g /kg body weight dose RU-21 at 30 min before alcohol; C group, pretreated by saline and without administration of alcohol (* p < 0.05, vs. T0); N group, pretreated by 2.19 g/kg body weight dose honey and without administration of alcohol. The data for T0, T1 and C groups represent mean ± SD, and the others represent mean
Mentions: As shown in Fig. 1, the locomotor activity of model group (T0 group) is significantly decreased compared with that of normal group (C group) at 40 min after alcohol. It demonstrated that the drunken animal model indeed succeeded. A statistically significant overall effect of low dose honey pretreatment for T1 group (2.19 g/kg BW dose honey) was observed (p < 0.05, vs. T0 group, n = 10 per group) within 60 min after alcohol. The effect was also observed for T2 group (4.39 g/kg BW dose honey) at 20 min and 40 min (p < 0.05, vs. T0 group, n = 10 per group). In addition, the statistically significant effect could be also observed for P group (positive drug, RU-21) at 20 min and 40 min (p = 0.03 and 0.07, respectively, vs. T0 group, n = 10 per group) after ethanol. There were no significant differences between N and C groups.Figure 1

Bottom Line: Furthermore, the treatment of 2.19 g/kg honey could decrease significantly the blood ethanol concentration in intoxicated mice.The anti-intoxication activity of honey could be due to the effect of the fructose contained in the honey.Honey indeed possesses anti-intoxication activity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Traditional Chinese Medicine Resource and Bee products, College of Bee Science, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, 350002, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: For a long time, honey was purportedly helpful to prevent drunkenness and relieve hangover symptoms. However, few of the assertions have experienced scientific assessment. The present study examined the effects of honey on intoxicated male mice.

Methods: Low or high doses of lychee flower honey (2.19 or 4.39 g/kg body weight, respectively) were single orally administrated 30 min before the ethanol intoxication of mice, followed by recording the locomotor activity by autonomic activity instrument and observing the climbing ability after alcohol. On the other hand, 2.19 g/kg honey was single orally administrated 5 min after the ethanol intoxication of mice, followed by determining the ethanol concentration in mice blood. In addition, subacute alcoholism mice models were developed and after the treatment of 2.19 g/kg honey s.i.d for successive three days, the level of serum malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity were detected in the models.

Results: Both of the two doses of honey increased the autonomic activity of alcoholized mice. Furthermore, the treatment of 2.19 g/kg honey could decrease significantly the blood ethanol concentration in intoxicated mice. The anti-intoxication activity of honey could be due to the effect of the fructose contained in the honey. Meanwhile, honey could not affect the serum MDA level and GSH-Px activity in alcoholism mice models.

Conclusion: Honey indeed possesses anti-intoxication activity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus