Limits...
Attitudes and avatars instrument: development and initial testing.

Lyles AA, Riesch SK, Brown RL - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The ATTAIN was found to have high content validity, slightly below recommended levels for internal consistency, and varied test-retest reliability.The results of this study suggest preliminarily a theoretically derived instrument with appropriate content for young adolescent boys and variable reliability.The ATTAIN has potential to be used as a screening instrument for young adolescents boys and understanding their attitudes toward their bodies; however, it will require continued development and testing to establish construct and discriminant validity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Nursing & Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Annmarie.Lyles@asu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of the study was to develop and test the initial psychometric properties of the ATTitudes and Avatars INstrument (ATTAIN). The integrated behavior model guided instrument development to measure the young adolescent boys' attitudes, intentions and actions to change their bodies.

Methods: An adolescent health expert panel and young adolescent boys were recruited to test for content validity. Fifty-nine boys 11 to 14 years of age were recruited at a middle school in the USA during physical education class to conduct a pilot study to test for internal consistency and test-retest reliability.

Results: The ATTAIN was found to have high content validity, slightly below recommended levels for internal consistency, and varied test-retest reliability.

Conclusion: The long-term goal of the development and testing of the ATTAIN is to make it available to researchers and professionals to screen and focus on adolescents' perceptions of their bodies and using those perceptions to attain and maintain healthy bodies. The results of this study suggest preliminarily a theoretically derived instrument with appropriate content for young adolescent boys and variable reliability. The attitudes, intentions, and actions survey items and avatars as measured by the ATTAIN, were meaningful to the boys. The ATTAIN has potential to be used as a screening instrument for young adolescents boys and understanding their attitudes toward their bodies; however, it will require continued development and testing to establish construct and discriminant validity.

No MeSH data available.


Means of body parts for each avatar
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Fig5: Means of body parts for each avatar

Mentions: The means of each body part as a result of the boys creating their avatars and the measurements taken of the boys were computed (Fig. 5). When comparing the Current Avatar to the Preferred Avatar, the boys preferred to have bigger upper arms, forearms, and chests. On average their current and preferred perceptions of the other body parts were about the same. However a bigger difference occurred when comparing the Current Avatars and Preferred Avatars with the Actual Avatars. The boys indicated they thought they had bigger body parts and preferred to have bigger body parts when compared with their actual measurements. The widest difference existed when comparing the neck, upper arm, hips, and calves.Fig. 5


Attitudes and avatars instrument: development and initial testing.

Lyles AA, Riesch SK, Brown RL - BMC Public Health (2015)

Means of body parts for each avatar
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499877&req=5

Fig5: Means of body parts for each avatar
Mentions: The means of each body part as a result of the boys creating their avatars and the measurements taken of the boys were computed (Fig. 5). When comparing the Current Avatar to the Preferred Avatar, the boys preferred to have bigger upper arms, forearms, and chests. On average their current and preferred perceptions of the other body parts were about the same. However a bigger difference occurred when comparing the Current Avatars and Preferred Avatars with the Actual Avatars. The boys indicated they thought they had bigger body parts and preferred to have bigger body parts when compared with their actual measurements. The widest difference existed when comparing the neck, upper arm, hips, and calves.Fig. 5

Bottom Line: The ATTAIN was found to have high content validity, slightly below recommended levels for internal consistency, and varied test-retest reliability.The results of this study suggest preliminarily a theoretically derived instrument with appropriate content for young adolescent boys and variable reliability.The ATTAIN has potential to be used as a screening instrument for young adolescents boys and understanding their attitudes toward their bodies; however, it will require continued development and testing to establish construct and discriminant validity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Nursing & Health Innovation, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona, USA. Annmarie.Lyles@asu.edu.

ABSTRACT

Background: The purpose of the study was to develop and test the initial psychometric properties of the ATTitudes and Avatars INstrument (ATTAIN). The integrated behavior model guided instrument development to measure the young adolescent boys' attitudes, intentions and actions to change their bodies.

Methods: An adolescent health expert panel and young adolescent boys were recruited to test for content validity. Fifty-nine boys 11 to 14 years of age were recruited at a middle school in the USA during physical education class to conduct a pilot study to test for internal consistency and test-retest reliability.

Results: The ATTAIN was found to have high content validity, slightly below recommended levels for internal consistency, and varied test-retest reliability.

Conclusion: The long-term goal of the development and testing of the ATTAIN is to make it available to researchers and professionals to screen and focus on adolescents' perceptions of their bodies and using those perceptions to attain and maintain healthy bodies. The results of this study suggest preliminarily a theoretically derived instrument with appropriate content for young adolescent boys and variable reliability. The attitudes, intentions, and actions survey items and avatars as measured by the ATTAIN, were meaningful to the boys. The ATTAIN has potential to be used as a screening instrument for young adolescents boys and understanding their attitudes toward their bodies; however, it will require continued development and testing to establish construct and discriminant validity.

No MeSH data available.