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Ultra-high-resolution 3D imaging of atherosclerosis in mice with synchrotron differential phase contrast: a proof of concept study.

Bonanno G, Coppo S, Modregger P, Pellegrin M, Stuber A, Stampanoni M, Mazzolai L, Stuber M, van Heeswijk RB - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: The DPC imaging allowed for the visualization of complex structures such as the coronary arteries and their branches, the thin fibrous cap of atherosclerotic plaques as well as the chordae tendineae.The coronary vessel wall thickness ranged from 37.4 ± 5.6 μm in proximal coronary arteries to 13.6 ± 3.3 μm in distal branches.No consistent differences in coronary vessel wall thickness were detected between the wild-type and atherosclerotic hearts in this proof-of-concept study, although the standard deviation in the atherosclerotic mice was higher in most segments, consistent with the observation of occasional focal vessel wall thickening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Radiology, University Hospital (CHUV) and University (UNIL) of Lausanne, Switzerland [2] Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), Lausanne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
The goal of this study was to investigate the performance of 3D synchrotron differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging for the visualization of both macroscopic and microscopic aspects of atherosclerosis in the mouse vasculature ex vivo. The hearts and aortas of 2 atherosclerotic and 2 wild-type control mice were scanned with DPC imaging with an isotropic resolution of 15 μm. The coronary artery vessel walls were segmented in the DPC datasets to assess their thickness, and histological staining was performed at the level of atherosclerotic plaques. The DPC imaging allowed for the visualization of complex structures such as the coronary arteries and their branches, the thin fibrous cap of atherosclerotic plaques as well as the chordae tendineae. The coronary vessel wall thickness ranged from 37.4 ± 5.6 μm in proximal coronary arteries to 13.6 ± 3.3 μm in distal branches. No consistent differences in coronary vessel wall thickness were detected between the wild-type and atherosclerotic hearts in this proof-of-concept study, although the standard deviation in the atherosclerotic mice was higher in most segments, consistent with the observation of occasional focal vessel wall thickening. Overall, DPC imaging of the cardiovascular system of the mice allowed for a simultaneous detailed 3D morphological assessment of both large structures and microscopic details.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Three-dimensional DPC imaging of an ex-vivo ApoE−/− mouse heart.(A–C) The three principal axes of the heart give a clear overview of the global structure of the heart. The enlarged insets demonstrate the excellent contrast for the visualization of smaller structures such as the orientation of the myocytes (D), arteries, their walls and veins (E,F), part of an atherosclerotic plaque in the aortic sinus (G), valves (H) and even small structures in the papillary muscles (I). Since the left system was flushed with saline after sacrifice, a blood clot was present in all right ventricles (RV). However, no blood clots were observed in the coronary arteries and veins (E,F), suggesting that the saline flush passed through the entire myocardial vascular network. Minor non-physiological low-frequency fluctuations in image intensity were visible on a macroscopic scale (A–C), but these did not impact the contrast and visibility of the macroscopic or microscopic structures. RV = right ventricle, LV = left ventricle, RA = right atrium, LA = left atrium
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f1: Three-dimensional DPC imaging of an ex-vivo ApoE−/− mouse heart.(A–C) The three principal axes of the heart give a clear overview of the global structure of the heart. The enlarged insets demonstrate the excellent contrast for the visualization of smaller structures such as the orientation of the myocytes (D), arteries, their walls and veins (E,F), part of an atherosclerotic plaque in the aortic sinus (G), valves (H) and even small structures in the papillary muscles (I). Since the left system was flushed with saline after sacrifice, a blood clot was present in all right ventricles (RV). However, no blood clots were observed in the coronary arteries and veins (E,F), suggesting that the saline flush passed through the entire myocardial vascular network. Minor non-physiological low-frequency fluctuations in image intensity were visible on a macroscopic scale (A–C), but these did not impact the contrast and visibility of the macroscopic or microscopic structures. RV = right ventricle, LV = left ventricle, RA = right atrium, LA = left atrium

Mentions: The DPC imaging protocol resulted in high-resolution and high-contrast overviews of the mouse hearts. The entire heart including the ventricles and atria could be inspected, as well as small structures such as the coronary artery vessel walls, atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic sinus and all valves (Fig. 1).


Ultra-high-resolution 3D imaging of atherosclerosis in mice with synchrotron differential phase contrast: a proof of concept study.

Bonanno G, Coppo S, Modregger P, Pellegrin M, Stuber A, Stampanoni M, Mazzolai L, Stuber M, van Heeswijk RB - Sci Rep (2015)

Three-dimensional DPC imaging of an ex-vivo ApoE−/− mouse heart.(A–C) The three principal axes of the heart give a clear overview of the global structure of the heart. The enlarged insets demonstrate the excellent contrast for the visualization of smaller structures such as the orientation of the myocytes (D), arteries, their walls and veins (E,F), part of an atherosclerotic plaque in the aortic sinus (G), valves (H) and even small structures in the papillary muscles (I). Since the left system was flushed with saline after sacrifice, a blood clot was present in all right ventricles (RV). However, no blood clots were observed in the coronary arteries and veins (E,F), suggesting that the saline flush passed through the entire myocardial vascular network. Minor non-physiological low-frequency fluctuations in image intensity were visible on a macroscopic scale (A–C), but these did not impact the contrast and visibility of the macroscopic or microscopic structures. RV = right ventricle, LV = left ventricle, RA = right atrium, LA = left atrium
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499839&req=5

f1: Three-dimensional DPC imaging of an ex-vivo ApoE−/− mouse heart.(A–C) The three principal axes of the heart give a clear overview of the global structure of the heart. The enlarged insets demonstrate the excellent contrast for the visualization of smaller structures such as the orientation of the myocytes (D), arteries, their walls and veins (E,F), part of an atherosclerotic plaque in the aortic sinus (G), valves (H) and even small structures in the papillary muscles (I). Since the left system was flushed with saline after sacrifice, a blood clot was present in all right ventricles (RV). However, no blood clots were observed in the coronary arteries and veins (E,F), suggesting that the saline flush passed through the entire myocardial vascular network. Minor non-physiological low-frequency fluctuations in image intensity were visible on a macroscopic scale (A–C), but these did not impact the contrast and visibility of the macroscopic or microscopic structures. RV = right ventricle, LV = left ventricle, RA = right atrium, LA = left atrium
Mentions: The DPC imaging protocol resulted in high-resolution and high-contrast overviews of the mouse hearts. The entire heart including the ventricles and atria could be inspected, as well as small structures such as the coronary artery vessel walls, atherosclerotic plaques in the aortic sinus and all valves (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: The DPC imaging allowed for the visualization of complex structures such as the coronary arteries and their branches, the thin fibrous cap of atherosclerotic plaques as well as the chordae tendineae.The coronary vessel wall thickness ranged from 37.4 ± 5.6 μm in proximal coronary arteries to 13.6 ± 3.3 μm in distal branches.No consistent differences in coronary vessel wall thickness were detected between the wild-type and atherosclerotic hearts in this proof-of-concept study, although the standard deviation in the atherosclerotic mice was higher in most segments, consistent with the observation of occasional focal vessel wall thickening.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Radiology, University Hospital (CHUV) and University (UNIL) of Lausanne, Switzerland [2] Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM), Lausanne, Switzerland.

ABSTRACT
The goal of this study was to investigate the performance of 3D synchrotron differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging for the visualization of both macroscopic and microscopic aspects of atherosclerosis in the mouse vasculature ex vivo. The hearts and aortas of 2 atherosclerotic and 2 wild-type control mice were scanned with DPC imaging with an isotropic resolution of 15 μm. The coronary artery vessel walls were segmented in the DPC datasets to assess their thickness, and histological staining was performed at the level of atherosclerotic plaques. The DPC imaging allowed for the visualization of complex structures such as the coronary arteries and their branches, the thin fibrous cap of atherosclerotic plaques as well as the chordae tendineae. The coronary vessel wall thickness ranged from 37.4 ± 5.6 μm in proximal coronary arteries to 13.6 ± 3.3 μm in distal branches. No consistent differences in coronary vessel wall thickness were detected between the wild-type and atherosclerotic hearts in this proof-of-concept study, although the standard deviation in the atherosclerotic mice was higher in most segments, consistent with the observation of occasional focal vessel wall thickening. Overall, DPC imaging of the cardiovascular system of the mice allowed for a simultaneous detailed 3D morphological assessment of both large structures and microscopic details.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus