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Curved singular beams for three-dimensional particle manipulation.

Zhao J, Chremmos ID, Song D, Christodoulides DN, Efremidis NK, Chen Z - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: For decades, singular beams carrying angular momentum have been a topic of considerable interest.Their intriguing applications are ubiquitous in a variety of fields, ranging from optical manipulation to photon entanglement, and from microscopy and coronagraphy to free-space communications, detection of rotating black holes, and even relativistic electrons and strong-field physics.Our findings may open up new avenues for shaped light in various applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] The MOE Key Laboratory of Weak-Light Nonlinear Photonics, and TEDA Applied Physics Institute and School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300457, China [2] CREOL/College of Optics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 [3] Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 [4] Science and Technology on Solid-State Laser Laboratory, North China Institute of Electronics Optics, Beijing 100015, China.

ABSTRACT
For decades, singular beams carrying angular momentum have been a topic of considerable interest. Their intriguing applications are ubiquitous in a variety of fields, ranging from optical manipulation to photon entanglement, and from microscopy and coronagraphy to free-space communications, detection of rotating black holes, and even relativistic electrons and strong-field physics. In most applications, however, singular beams travel naturally along a straight line, expanding during linear propagation or breaking up in nonlinear media. Here, we design and demonstrate diffraction-resisting singular beams that travel along arbitrary trajectories in space. These curved beams not only maintain an invariant dark "hole" in the center but also preserve their angular momentum, exhibiting combined features of optical vortex, Bessel, and Airy beams. Furthermore, we observe three-dimensional spiraling of microparticles driven by such fine-shaped dynamical beams. Our findings may open up new avenues for shaped light in various applications.

No MeSH data available.


Demonstrations of a triply-charged singular beam (m = 3) propagating along a 3D curved trajectory.(a) Numerically simulated 3D visualization of the beam propagation, where the solid white curve represents the predesigned beam trajectory; (b–d) Numerically simulated (left column) and experimentally recorded (right column) beam patterns taken at different transverse planes marked in (a). The inserts in (c) are the corresponding interferograms, and the crosses mark the center of the initial beam as a reference point.
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f3: Demonstrations of a triply-charged singular beam (m = 3) propagating along a 3D curved trajectory.(a) Numerically simulated 3D visualization of the beam propagation, where the solid white curve represents the predesigned beam trajectory; (b–d) Numerically simulated (left column) and experimentally recorded (right column) beam patterns taken at different transverse planes marked in (a). The inserts in (c) are the corresponding interferograms, and the crosses mark the center of the initial beam as a reference point.

Mentions: Using this same approach, the singular beam can be made to follow any arbitrary trajectory. Other exemplary examples include two-dimensional snake-like or hyperbolic trajectories as well as arbitrarily designed curved trajectories in 3D space. In Fig. 3, we show a triply-charged (m = 3) singular beam propagating along a predesigned 3D trajectory, where the white focal curve (f(z), g(z), z) is given by f(z) = 5 tanh[0.12(z − 10)] + 5, and g(z) = 6sech[0.12(z − 10)]. Careful analysis shows that the singular beam asymptotically takes the high-order (J3) Bessel profile along the curved trajectory, while the central main lobe exhibits a diffraction-resisting dark core with a preserved topological charge. The singular beam curves in both x and y directions during propagation along the longitudinal z direction, as shown in Fig. 3a. The transverse patterns and interferograms taken at different propagation distances (Fig. 3b–d) show clearly that the main lobe is nearly diffraction-free, and the topological charge (m = 3) persists during propagation. Again, the experimental results match well with those from theory. We mention that the spatial twist and OAM has also been suggested from the theory of spontaneous knotting of nonlinear self-trapped waves, but here all spatial shaping is achieved in linear regime and can be in principle implemented in free space3536.


Curved singular beams for three-dimensional particle manipulation.

Zhao J, Chremmos ID, Song D, Christodoulides DN, Efremidis NK, Chen Z - Sci Rep (2015)

Demonstrations of a triply-charged singular beam (m = 3) propagating along a 3D curved trajectory.(a) Numerically simulated 3D visualization of the beam propagation, where the solid white curve represents the predesigned beam trajectory; (b–d) Numerically simulated (left column) and experimentally recorded (right column) beam patterns taken at different transverse planes marked in (a). The inserts in (c) are the corresponding interferograms, and the crosses mark the center of the initial beam as a reference point.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499814&req=5

f3: Demonstrations of a triply-charged singular beam (m = 3) propagating along a 3D curved trajectory.(a) Numerically simulated 3D visualization of the beam propagation, where the solid white curve represents the predesigned beam trajectory; (b–d) Numerically simulated (left column) and experimentally recorded (right column) beam patterns taken at different transverse planes marked in (a). The inserts in (c) are the corresponding interferograms, and the crosses mark the center of the initial beam as a reference point.
Mentions: Using this same approach, the singular beam can be made to follow any arbitrary trajectory. Other exemplary examples include two-dimensional snake-like or hyperbolic trajectories as well as arbitrarily designed curved trajectories in 3D space. In Fig. 3, we show a triply-charged (m = 3) singular beam propagating along a predesigned 3D trajectory, where the white focal curve (f(z), g(z), z) is given by f(z) = 5 tanh[0.12(z − 10)] + 5, and g(z) = 6sech[0.12(z − 10)]. Careful analysis shows that the singular beam asymptotically takes the high-order (J3) Bessel profile along the curved trajectory, while the central main lobe exhibits a diffraction-resisting dark core with a preserved topological charge. The singular beam curves in both x and y directions during propagation along the longitudinal z direction, as shown in Fig. 3a. The transverse patterns and interferograms taken at different propagation distances (Fig. 3b–d) show clearly that the main lobe is nearly diffraction-free, and the topological charge (m = 3) persists during propagation. Again, the experimental results match well with those from theory. We mention that the spatial twist and OAM has also been suggested from the theory of spontaneous knotting of nonlinear self-trapped waves, but here all spatial shaping is achieved in linear regime and can be in principle implemented in free space3536.

Bottom Line: For decades, singular beams carrying angular momentum have been a topic of considerable interest.Their intriguing applications are ubiquitous in a variety of fields, ranging from optical manipulation to photon entanglement, and from microscopy and coronagraphy to free-space communications, detection of rotating black holes, and even relativistic electrons and strong-field physics.Our findings may open up new avenues for shaped light in various applications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] The MOE Key Laboratory of Weak-Light Nonlinear Photonics, and TEDA Applied Physics Institute and School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300457, China [2] CREOL/College of Optics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 [3] Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 [4] Science and Technology on Solid-State Laser Laboratory, North China Institute of Electronics Optics, Beijing 100015, China.

ABSTRACT
For decades, singular beams carrying angular momentum have been a topic of considerable interest. Their intriguing applications are ubiquitous in a variety of fields, ranging from optical manipulation to photon entanglement, and from microscopy and coronagraphy to free-space communications, detection of rotating black holes, and even relativistic electrons and strong-field physics. In most applications, however, singular beams travel naturally along a straight line, expanding during linear propagation or breaking up in nonlinear media. Here, we design and demonstrate diffraction-resisting singular beams that travel along arbitrary trajectories in space. These curved beams not only maintain an invariant dark "hole" in the center but also preserve their angular momentum, exhibiting combined features of optical vortex, Bessel, and Airy beams. Furthermore, we observe three-dimensional spiraling of microparticles driven by such fine-shaped dynamical beams. Our findings may open up new avenues for shaped light in various applications.

No MeSH data available.