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Spatial distribution and ecological niches of non-breeding planktivorous petrels.

Navarro J, Cardador L, Brown R, Phillips RA - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: According to niche theory, mechanisms exist that allow co-existence of organisms that would otherwise compete for the same prey and other resources.Here we investigate for the first time the potential role of spatial, environmental (habitat) and trophic (isotopic) segregation as niche-partitioning mechanisms during the non-breeding season for four species of highly abundant, zooplanktivorous seabird that breed sympatrically in the Southern Ocean.Spatial segregation was found to be the main partitioning mechanism; even for the two sibling species of diving petrel, which spent the non-breeding period in overlapping areas, there was evidence from distribution and stable isotope ratios for differences in habitat use and diving depth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservation Biology, Estación Biológica de Doñana CSIC, Sevilla 41092, Spain.

ABSTRACT
According to niche theory, mechanisms exist that allow co-existence of organisms that would otherwise compete for the same prey and other resources. How seabirds cope with potential competition during the non-breeding period is poorly documented, particularly for small species. Here we investigate for the first time the potential role of spatial, environmental (habitat) and trophic (isotopic) segregation as niche-partitioning mechanisms during the non-breeding season for four species of highly abundant, zooplanktivorous seabird that breed sympatrically in the Southern Ocean. Spatial segregation was found to be the main partitioning mechanism; even for the two sibling species of diving petrel, which spent the non-breeding period in overlapping areas, there was evidence from distribution and stable isotope ratios for differences in habitat use and diving depth.

No MeSH data available.


Locations of blue petrels, Antarctic prions, South Georgia diving petrels and common diving petrels from South Georgia (white star) tracked using geolocators during the non-breeding season in 2011 (the map is made by ArcGIS 9.3.1 software,http://www.arcgis.com/features).
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f1: Locations of blue petrels, Antarctic prions, South Georgia diving petrels and common diving petrels from South Georgia (white star) tracked using geolocators during the non-breeding season in 2011 (the map is made by ArcGIS 9.3.1 software,http://www.arcgis.com/features).

Mentions: Spatial overlap was very low and non-significant for all species, except the two diving petrels (Table 1, Figs 1 and 2a). Blue petrels occupied a broad swathe of Antarctic waters in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, with two areas of high density in the south and southeast of South Georgia (Fig. 1). Antarctic prions were also distributed in Atlantic and, to a lesser extent, Pacific waters, but at lower latitudes than blue petrels (Fig. 1). South Georgia and common diving petrels remained in the Atlantic, either close to South Georgia or in an area to the east-northeast (Fig. 1).


Spatial distribution and ecological niches of non-breeding planktivorous petrels.

Navarro J, Cardador L, Brown R, Phillips RA - Sci Rep (2015)

Locations of blue petrels, Antarctic prions, South Georgia diving petrels and common diving petrels from South Georgia (white star) tracked using geolocators during the non-breeding season in 2011 (the map is made by ArcGIS 9.3.1 software,http://www.arcgis.com/features).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499811&req=5

f1: Locations of blue petrels, Antarctic prions, South Georgia diving petrels and common diving petrels from South Georgia (white star) tracked using geolocators during the non-breeding season in 2011 (the map is made by ArcGIS 9.3.1 software,http://www.arcgis.com/features).
Mentions: Spatial overlap was very low and non-significant for all species, except the two diving petrels (Table 1, Figs 1 and 2a). Blue petrels occupied a broad swathe of Antarctic waters in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, with two areas of high density in the south and southeast of South Georgia (Fig. 1). Antarctic prions were also distributed in Atlantic and, to a lesser extent, Pacific waters, but at lower latitudes than blue petrels (Fig. 1). South Georgia and common diving petrels remained in the Atlantic, either close to South Georgia or in an area to the east-northeast (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: According to niche theory, mechanisms exist that allow co-existence of organisms that would otherwise compete for the same prey and other resources.Here we investigate for the first time the potential role of spatial, environmental (habitat) and trophic (isotopic) segregation as niche-partitioning mechanisms during the non-breeding season for four species of highly abundant, zooplanktivorous seabird that breed sympatrically in the Southern Ocean.Spatial segregation was found to be the main partitioning mechanism; even for the two sibling species of diving petrel, which spent the non-breeding period in overlapping areas, there was evidence from distribution and stable isotope ratios for differences in habitat use and diving depth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservation Biology, Estación Biológica de Doñana CSIC, Sevilla 41092, Spain.

ABSTRACT
According to niche theory, mechanisms exist that allow co-existence of organisms that would otherwise compete for the same prey and other resources. How seabirds cope with potential competition during the non-breeding period is poorly documented, particularly for small species. Here we investigate for the first time the potential role of spatial, environmental (habitat) and trophic (isotopic) segregation as niche-partitioning mechanisms during the non-breeding season for four species of highly abundant, zooplanktivorous seabird that breed sympatrically in the Southern Ocean. Spatial segregation was found to be the main partitioning mechanism; even for the two sibling species of diving petrel, which spent the non-breeding period in overlapping areas, there was evidence from distribution and stable isotope ratios for differences in habitat use and diving depth.

No MeSH data available.