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Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype.

Ware MJ, Tinger S, Colbert KL, Corr SJ, Rees P, Koshkina N, Curley S, Summers HD, Godin B - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease.Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment.Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas, USA [2] Centre for Nanohealth, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.

ABSTRACT
The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Polymorphic response to RF treatment.Percentage of balled cells in various sub-populations indicates increased thermotolerance and the pre-existence of more heat sensitive cells. (Cytoplasm retracted cell classified as cells, which display at least a 33% decrease in cell area) (*p < 0.01, **p < 0.05).
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f7: Polymorphic response to RF treatment.Percentage of balled cells in various sub-populations indicates increased thermotolerance and the pre-existence of more heat sensitive cells. (Cytoplasm retracted cell classified as cells, which display at least a 33% decrease in cell area) (*p < 0.01, **p < 0.05).

Mentions: A patient is likely to receive multiple exposures to RF waves over the course of his/her RF treatment schedule. Therefore it is warranted to investigate the effects of multiple RF treatments on cells. When subjected to two or three RF treatments 24 h apart, both PANC-1 and AsPc-1 cells exhibited cytoplasmic retraction similar to that seen following a single RF treatment. However, after four treatments it was evident that the cytoplasmic retraction in response to the RF treatment declined in the adhered sub-population of cells. This effect, shown in Fig. 7 (Fig. S6, Supplementary) was quantified using a textural analysis algorithm in MATLAB (MATLAB code S7.2, Supplementary), which measured the total area of the space between cells in the monolayer. This area was normalized to the space between cells before RF. The algorithm determined that after a single RF treatment the cell free space increased by 23.7% and after 4 treatments it increased by only 4.2%. The cells found in the supernatant and reseeded in fresh media remained susceptible to thermal shock as nearly 100% of cells in this sub-population were balled after RF treatment (Fig. 7, Figs. S6 and S7.1, Supplementary).


Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype.

Ware MJ, Tinger S, Colbert KL, Corr SJ, Rees P, Koshkina N, Curley S, Summers HD, Godin B - Sci Rep (2015)

Polymorphic response to RF treatment.Percentage of balled cells in various sub-populations indicates increased thermotolerance and the pre-existence of more heat sensitive cells. (Cytoplasm retracted cell classified as cells, which display at least a 33% decrease in cell area) (*p < 0.01, **p < 0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499808&req=5

f7: Polymorphic response to RF treatment.Percentage of balled cells in various sub-populations indicates increased thermotolerance and the pre-existence of more heat sensitive cells. (Cytoplasm retracted cell classified as cells, which display at least a 33% decrease in cell area) (*p < 0.01, **p < 0.05).
Mentions: A patient is likely to receive multiple exposures to RF waves over the course of his/her RF treatment schedule. Therefore it is warranted to investigate the effects of multiple RF treatments on cells. When subjected to two or three RF treatments 24 h apart, both PANC-1 and AsPc-1 cells exhibited cytoplasmic retraction similar to that seen following a single RF treatment. However, after four treatments it was evident that the cytoplasmic retraction in response to the RF treatment declined in the adhered sub-population of cells. This effect, shown in Fig. 7 (Fig. S6, Supplementary) was quantified using a textural analysis algorithm in MATLAB (MATLAB code S7.2, Supplementary), which measured the total area of the space between cells in the monolayer. This area was normalized to the space between cells before RF. The algorithm determined that after a single RF treatment the cell free space increased by 23.7% and after 4 treatments it increased by only 4.2%. The cells found in the supernatant and reseeded in fresh media remained susceptible to thermal shock as nearly 100% of cells in this sub-population were balled after RF treatment (Fig. 7, Figs. S6 and S7.1, Supplementary).

Bottom Line: These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease.Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment.Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas, USA [2] Centre for Nanohealth, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.

ABSTRACT
The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus