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Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype.

Ware MJ, Tinger S, Colbert KL, Corr SJ, Rees P, Koshkina N, Curley S, Summers HD, Godin B - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease.Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment.Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas, USA [2] Centre for Nanohealth, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.

ABSTRACT
The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

RF affects physical properties of the plasma membrane.a) AFM probe aligned with x20 magnification brightfield image guidance, which scans points of interest over cytoplasm (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells), (scale bar = 50 μm). b) AFM force curves of PANC-1 before RF (B1–B3) and after RF (B4) (Red retraction curve indicates adhesion; blue extension curve indicates elastic moduli). c) Elastic Modulus (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells). d) Percentage of sites which display adhesion on the cell membrane and C) magnitude of adhesion at adhesion sites (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells) (*p < 0.01).
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f5: RF affects physical properties of the plasma membrane.a) AFM probe aligned with x20 magnification brightfield image guidance, which scans points of interest over cytoplasm (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells), (scale bar = 50 μm). b) AFM force curves of PANC-1 before RF (B1–B3) and after RF (B4) (Red retraction curve indicates adhesion; blue extension curve indicates elastic moduli). c) Elastic Modulus (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells). d) Percentage of sites which display adhesion on the cell membrane and C) magnitude of adhesion at adhesion sites (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells) (*p < 0.01).

Mentions: AFM allows the high-resolution characterization of the pancreatic cancer cell surface, which provides a platform for the multi-parameter analysis of cell function24. For instance, cancer cell mechanics, such as adhesion and elastic modulus, can influence tumor growth and metastatic potential25. The elastic moduli decreased in all three cell-lines following RF treatment (Fig. 5), which indicates that the cell membrane had become less stiff and perhaps more fluid in response to RF treatment. Our data show the effect of RF treatment on the physical (mechanical) properties of the whole cells. Although in this manuscript we haven’t examined the effect of RF therapy on the mechanical properties of the nucleus or other organelles, this is one of the aspects that should be addressed in future studies. As an example, Wolf and colleagues have recently shown that cell migration in the confined space was governed in part by the ability of the nucleus to deform under stress26.


Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype.

Ware MJ, Tinger S, Colbert KL, Corr SJ, Rees P, Koshkina N, Curley S, Summers HD, Godin B - Sci Rep (2015)

RF affects physical properties of the plasma membrane.a) AFM probe aligned with x20 magnification brightfield image guidance, which scans points of interest over cytoplasm (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells), (scale bar = 50 μm). b) AFM force curves of PANC-1 before RF (B1–B3) and after RF (B4) (Red retraction curve indicates adhesion; blue extension curve indicates elastic moduli). c) Elastic Modulus (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells). d) Percentage of sites which display adhesion on the cell membrane and C) magnitude of adhesion at adhesion sites (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells) (*p < 0.01).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499808&req=5

f5: RF affects physical properties of the plasma membrane.a) AFM probe aligned with x20 magnification brightfield image guidance, which scans points of interest over cytoplasm (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells), (scale bar = 50 μm). b) AFM force curves of PANC-1 before RF (B1–B3) and after RF (B4) (Red retraction curve indicates adhesion; blue extension curve indicates elastic moduli). c) Elastic Modulus (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells). d) Percentage of sites which display adhesion on the cell membrane and C) magnitude of adhesion at adhesion sites (n = 500 points on membrane of 20 cells) (*p < 0.01).
Mentions: AFM allows the high-resolution characterization of the pancreatic cancer cell surface, which provides a platform for the multi-parameter analysis of cell function24. For instance, cancer cell mechanics, such as adhesion and elastic modulus, can influence tumor growth and metastatic potential25. The elastic moduli decreased in all three cell-lines following RF treatment (Fig. 5), which indicates that the cell membrane had become less stiff and perhaps more fluid in response to RF treatment. Our data show the effect of RF treatment on the physical (mechanical) properties of the whole cells. Although in this manuscript we haven’t examined the effect of RF therapy on the mechanical properties of the nucleus or other organelles, this is one of the aspects that should be addressed in future studies. As an example, Wolf and colleagues have recently shown that cell migration in the confined space was governed in part by the ability of the nucleus to deform under stress26.

Bottom Line: These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease.Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment.Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1] Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas, USA [2] Centre for Nanohealth, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Swansea, UK.

ABSTRACT
The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus