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Synaptic representation of locomotion in single cerebellar granule cells.

Powell K, Mathy A, Duguid I, Häusser M - Elife (2015)

Bottom Line: Here, we use in vivo patch-clamp recordings to show that locomotion can be directly read out from mossy fiber synaptic input and spike output in single granule cells.The increase in granule cell spiking during locomotion is enhanced by glutamate spillover currents recruited during movement.Thus, synaptic input delivers remarkably rich information to single neurons during locomotion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research and Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
The cerebellum plays a crucial role in the regulation of locomotion, but how movement is represented at the synaptic level is not known. Here, we use in vivo patch-clamp recordings to show that locomotion can be directly read out from mossy fiber synaptic input and spike output in single granule cells. The increase in granule cell spiking during locomotion is enhanced by glutamate spillover currents recruited during movement. Surprisingly, the entire step sequence can be predicted from input EPSCs and output spikes of a single granule cell, suggesting that a robust gait code is present already at the cerebellar input layer and transmitted via the granule cell pathway to downstream Purkinje cells. Thus, synaptic input delivers remarkably rich information to single neurons during locomotion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Simultaneous recording of IPSCs and EPSCs during locomotion.(A) recording of EPSCs (inward currents) and IPSCs (outward currents) concurrently in a granule cell voltage clamped at ∼-30 mV. (B) Cross-correlation with motion index for IPSCs (green) and EPSCs (red), shows a much stronger cross-correlation for EPSCs than IPSCs.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07290.014
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fig5: Simultaneous recording of IPSCs and EPSCs during locomotion.(A) recording of EPSCs (inward currents) and IPSCs (outward currents) concurrently in a granule cell voltage clamped at ∼-30 mV. (B) Cross-correlation with motion index for IPSCs (green) and EPSCs (red), shows a much stronger cross-correlation for EPSCs than IPSCs.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07290.014

Mentions: Although our manuscript has focused on excitation of granule cells during locomotion, we agree that this is an interesting issue. We have obtained a recording of a granule cell at an intermediate holding potential where both IPSCs and EPSCs are detectable. In this recording, which is shown in Author response image 1, the cross-correlation between activity and the motion index is much lower for the IPSCs than EPSCs. This echoes results in other sensory areas showing that tuning of inhibition is broader than for excitation. While this data is interesting and provocative, the extremely low experimental yield for these experiments means the role of inhibition would be better explored in a subsequent project dedicated to this question. We have now included a discussion of the effects of inhibition on granule cells during locomotion, as suggested.


Synaptic representation of locomotion in single cerebellar granule cells.

Powell K, Mathy A, Duguid I, Häusser M - Elife (2015)

Simultaneous recording of IPSCs and EPSCs during locomotion.(A) recording of EPSCs (inward currents) and IPSCs (outward currents) concurrently in a granule cell voltage clamped at ∼-30 mV. (B) Cross-correlation with motion index for IPSCs (green) and EPSCs (red), shows a much stronger cross-correlation for EPSCs than IPSCs.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07290.014
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499793&req=5

fig5: Simultaneous recording of IPSCs and EPSCs during locomotion.(A) recording of EPSCs (inward currents) and IPSCs (outward currents) concurrently in a granule cell voltage clamped at ∼-30 mV. (B) Cross-correlation with motion index for IPSCs (green) and EPSCs (red), shows a much stronger cross-correlation for EPSCs than IPSCs.DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07290.014
Mentions: Although our manuscript has focused on excitation of granule cells during locomotion, we agree that this is an interesting issue. We have obtained a recording of a granule cell at an intermediate holding potential where both IPSCs and EPSCs are detectable. In this recording, which is shown in Author response image 1, the cross-correlation between activity and the motion index is much lower for the IPSCs than EPSCs. This echoes results in other sensory areas showing that tuning of inhibition is broader than for excitation. While this data is interesting and provocative, the extremely low experimental yield for these experiments means the role of inhibition would be better explored in a subsequent project dedicated to this question. We have now included a discussion of the effects of inhibition on granule cells during locomotion, as suggested.

Bottom Line: Here, we use in vivo patch-clamp recordings to show that locomotion can be directly read out from mossy fiber synaptic input and spike output in single granule cells.The increase in granule cell spiking during locomotion is enhanced by glutamate spillover currents recruited during movement.Thus, synaptic input delivers remarkably rich information to single neurons during locomotion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Wolfson Institute for Biomedical Research and Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, London, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
The cerebellum plays a crucial role in the regulation of locomotion, but how movement is represented at the synaptic level is not known. Here, we use in vivo patch-clamp recordings to show that locomotion can be directly read out from mossy fiber synaptic input and spike output in single granule cells. The increase in granule cell spiking during locomotion is enhanced by glutamate spillover currents recruited during movement. Surprisingly, the entire step sequence can be predicted from input EPSCs and output spikes of a single granule cell, suggesting that a robust gait code is present already at the cerebellar input layer and transmitted via the granule cell pathway to downstream Purkinje cells. Thus, synaptic input delivers remarkably rich information to single neurons during locomotion.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus