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How family carers engage with technical health procedures in the home: a grounded theory study.

McDonald J, McKinlay E, Keeling S, Levack W - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Embracing care included cognitive understanding of the purpose and benefits of a procedure; accepting a 'technical' solution; practical management; and an emotional response.Accepting embrace is primarily motivated by perceived benefits for the recipient.Resisting or reluctant acceptance results from a lack of understanding about the procedure or willingness to manage it.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rehabilitation Teaching and Research Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.

No MeSH data available.


A visual representation of movement between the five dispositions towards caring and management of technical health procedures in the home.
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BMJOPEN2015007761F1: A visual representation of movement between the five dispositions towards caring and management of technical health procedures in the home.

Mentions: The findings presented in this paper describe how the family carers experienced and responded to taking on the role of managing technical health procedures in the home. Presented below are five themes that reflect five dispositions towards the caring role with respect to the management of these technical health procedures. These are the five dispositions: (1) Embracing care, (2) Resisting, (3) Reluctant acceptance, (4) Relinquishing and (5) Being overwhelmed. These titles are intended to be descriptive rather than imply any judgement value or hierarchy among the dispositions. In addition, carers did not remain fixed in one position, but commonly moved between them. Figure 1 presents the relationships between these dispositions in terms of how the family carers described movements between them over time. The overarching label for these results has been taken from the most central of these dispositions, that of ‘Embracing care’.


How family carers engage with technical health procedures in the home: a grounded theory study.

McDonald J, McKinlay E, Keeling S, Levack W - BMJ Open (2015)

A visual representation of movement between the five dispositions towards caring and management of technical health procedures in the home.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499733&req=5

BMJOPEN2015007761F1: A visual representation of movement between the five dispositions towards caring and management of technical health procedures in the home.
Mentions: The findings presented in this paper describe how the family carers experienced and responded to taking on the role of managing technical health procedures in the home. Presented below are five themes that reflect five dispositions towards the caring role with respect to the management of these technical health procedures. These are the five dispositions: (1) Embracing care, (2) Resisting, (3) Reluctant acceptance, (4) Relinquishing and (5) Being overwhelmed. These titles are intended to be descriptive rather than imply any judgement value or hierarchy among the dispositions. In addition, carers did not remain fixed in one position, but commonly moved between them. Figure 1 presents the relationships between these dispositions in terms of how the family carers described movements between them over time. The overarching label for these results has been taken from the most central of these dispositions, that of ‘Embracing care’.

Bottom Line: Embracing care included cognitive understanding of the purpose and benefits of a procedure; accepting a 'technical' solution; practical management; and an emotional response.Accepting embrace is primarily motivated by perceived benefits for the recipient.Resisting or reluctant acceptance results from a lack of understanding about the procedure or willingness to manage it.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Rehabilitation Teaching and Research Unit, Department of Medicine, University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand.

No MeSH data available.