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Is researching adverse events in hospital deaths a good way to describe patient safety in hospitals: a retrospective patient record review study.

Baines RJ, Langelaan M, de Bruijne MC, Wagner C - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: A total of 11,949 hospital admissions; 50% of inpatient deaths; the other half of patients discharged while alive.Patients who died in hospital were on an average older, had a longer length of stay, were more often urgently admitted and were less often admitted to a surgical unit.Reviewing patient records of inpatient deaths is more efficient in identifying preventable AEs than reviewing records of those discharged alive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NIVEL, Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of clinical process related to preventable adverse event; % are weighted for hospital type.
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BMJOPEN2014007380F1: Distribution of clinical process related to preventable adverse event; % are weighted for hospital type.

Mentions: We further assessed the clinical process related to preventable AEs in inpatient deaths and patient admissions discharged alive (figure 1). In inpatient deaths, 27.8% of the preventable AEs were related to diagnostics, as opposed to 12.9% of the patients discharged alive (p<0.001). AEs and preventable AEs of patients discharged alive were proportionally more often related to surgery. In 53.7% of the preventable AEs, the related clinical process was surgery in patients discharged alive, as opposed to 29.7% of the inpatient deaths (p<0.001). This lower proportion of surgical preventable AEs in inpatient deaths is primarily related to fewer admissions to surgical departments in this group (table 2). When analysing the clinical process related to the preventable AEs for the subgroup of patients who were admitted to a surgical department, these differences disappear to a large extent. For inpatient deaths, 70.7% of the preventable AEs is then related to the surgical process while for patients discharged alive, this is 81.6%.


Is researching adverse events in hospital deaths a good way to describe patient safety in hospitals: a retrospective patient record review study.

Baines RJ, Langelaan M, de Bruijne MC, Wagner C - BMJ Open (2015)

Distribution of clinical process related to preventable adverse event; % are weighted for hospital type.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499703&req=5

BMJOPEN2014007380F1: Distribution of clinical process related to preventable adverse event; % are weighted for hospital type.
Mentions: We further assessed the clinical process related to preventable AEs in inpatient deaths and patient admissions discharged alive (figure 1). In inpatient deaths, 27.8% of the preventable AEs were related to diagnostics, as opposed to 12.9% of the patients discharged alive (p<0.001). AEs and preventable AEs of patients discharged alive were proportionally more often related to surgery. In 53.7% of the preventable AEs, the related clinical process was surgery in patients discharged alive, as opposed to 29.7% of the inpatient deaths (p<0.001). This lower proportion of surgical preventable AEs in inpatient deaths is primarily related to fewer admissions to surgical departments in this group (table 2). When analysing the clinical process related to the preventable AEs for the subgroup of patients who were admitted to a surgical department, these differences disappear to a large extent. For inpatient deaths, 70.7% of the preventable AEs is then related to the surgical process while for patients discharged alive, this is 81.6%.

Bottom Line: A total of 11,949 hospital admissions; 50% of inpatient deaths; the other half of patients discharged while alive.Patients who died in hospital were on an average older, had a longer length of stay, were more often urgently admitted and were less often admitted to a surgical unit.Reviewing patient records of inpatient deaths is more efficient in identifying preventable AEs than reviewing records of those discharged alive.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NIVEL, Netherlands Institute for Health Services Research, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus