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A cross-sectional study of the prevalence and associations of iron deficiency in a cohort of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Nickol AH, Frise MC, Cheng HY, McGahey A, McFadyen BM, Harris-Wright T, Bart NK, Curtis MK, Khandwala S, O'Neill DP, Pollard KA, Hardinge FM, Rahman NM, Armitage AE, Dorrington KL, Drakesmith H, Ratcliffe PJ, Robbins PA - BMJ Open (2015)

Bottom Line: Iron deficiency, with or without anaemia, is associated with other chronic conditions, such as congestive heart failure, where it predicts a worse outcome.Patients with iron deficiency had more self-reported exacerbations and a trend towards worse exercise tolerance.Iron deficiency associates with hypoxaemia, an excess of exacerbations and, possibly, worse exercise tolerance, all markers of poor prognosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Oxford Centre for Respiratory Medicine and the Oxford Respiratory Trials Unit, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Venn diagram showing proportions of patients with COPD who were iron deficient, of indeterminate iron status or iron replete. No patients with COPD had a serum ferritin <12 µg/L. (B) Corresponding diagram for healthy control cohort. No healthy control participant had an sTfR >28.1 nmol/L (COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; sTfR, soluble transferrin receptor; TSat, transferrin saturation).
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BMJOPEN2015007911F1: (A) Venn diagram showing proportions of patients with COPD who were iron deficient, of indeterminate iron status or iron replete. No patients with COPD had a serum ferritin <12 µg/L. (B) Corresponding diagram for healthy control cohort. No healthy control participant had an sTfR >28.1 nmol/L (COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; sTfR, soluble transferrin receptor; TSat, transferrin saturation).

Mentions: Twenty patients with COPD (17.7%) were ID, 81 (71.7%) IR and 12 (10.6%) indeterminate (figure 1A). This contrasts with 3 (5.3%), 51 (89.5%) and 3 (5.3%), respectively, for the control cohort (p=0.029, χ2) (figure 1B). For the COPD cohort, there were no differences between the ID and IR groups in sex, smoking status, median number of pack years smoked or proportion receiving oxygen therapy. FEV1 appeared to be lower in the ID group but this difference was not statistically significant. Equally, in the COPD cohort as a whole, there was not a significant correlation between FEV1 and any index of iron status, be it sTfR, TSat or overall iron status rank (r=−0.068, p=0.477; r=0.111, p=0.240 and r=0.083, p=0.384; respectively). Characteristics of the COPD cohort are given in table 1.


A cross-sectional study of the prevalence and associations of iron deficiency in a cohort of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Nickol AH, Frise MC, Cheng HY, McGahey A, McFadyen BM, Harris-Wright T, Bart NK, Curtis MK, Khandwala S, O'Neill DP, Pollard KA, Hardinge FM, Rahman NM, Armitage AE, Dorrington KL, Drakesmith H, Ratcliffe PJ, Robbins PA - BMJ Open (2015)

(A) Venn diagram showing proportions of patients with COPD who were iron deficient, of indeterminate iron status or iron replete. No patients with COPD had a serum ferritin <12 µg/L. (B) Corresponding diagram for healthy control cohort. No healthy control participant had an sTfR >28.1 nmol/L (COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; sTfR, soluble transferrin receptor; TSat, transferrin saturation).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499677&req=5

BMJOPEN2015007911F1: (A) Venn diagram showing proportions of patients with COPD who were iron deficient, of indeterminate iron status or iron replete. No patients with COPD had a serum ferritin <12 µg/L. (B) Corresponding diagram for healthy control cohort. No healthy control participant had an sTfR >28.1 nmol/L (COPD, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; sTfR, soluble transferrin receptor; TSat, transferrin saturation).
Mentions: Twenty patients with COPD (17.7%) were ID, 81 (71.7%) IR and 12 (10.6%) indeterminate (figure 1A). This contrasts with 3 (5.3%), 51 (89.5%) and 3 (5.3%), respectively, for the control cohort (p=0.029, χ2) (figure 1B). For the COPD cohort, there were no differences between the ID and IR groups in sex, smoking status, median number of pack years smoked or proportion receiving oxygen therapy. FEV1 appeared to be lower in the ID group but this difference was not statistically significant. Equally, in the COPD cohort as a whole, there was not a significant correlation between FEV1 and any index of iron status, be it sTfR, TSat or overall iron status rank (r=−0.068, p=0.477; r=0.111, p=0.240 and r=0.083, p=0.384; respectively). Characteristics of the COPD cohort are given in table 1.

Bottom Line: Iron deficiency, with or without anaemia, is associated with other chronic conditions, such as congestive heart failure, where it predicts a worse outcome.Patients with iron deficiency had more self-reported exacerbations and a trend towards worse exercise tolerance.Iron deficiency associates with hypoxaemia, an excess of exacerbations and, possibly, worse exercise tolerance, all markers of poor prognosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Oxford Centre for Respiratory Medicine and the Oxford Respiratory Trials Unit, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus