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Infectious Disease Physician Assessment of Hospital Preparedness for Ebola Virus Disease.

Polgreen PM, Santibanez S, Koonin LM, Rupp ME, Beekmann SE, Del Rio C - Open Forum Infect Dis (2015)

Bottom Line: The majority of respondents indicated preference for transfer of Ebola patients to specialized treatment centers rather than caring for them locally.In general, we found that larger hospitals and teaching hospitals reported higher levels of preparedness.Nevertheless, respondents from some hospitals indicated that they were relatively unprepared.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Emerging Infections Network , University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine , Iowa City, Iowa.

ABSTRACT
Background.  The first case of Ebola diagnosed in the United States and subsequent cases among 2 healthcare workers caring for that patient highlighted the importance of hospital preparedness in caring for Ebola patients. Methods.  From October 21, 2014 to November 11, 2014, infectious disease physicians who are part of the Emerging Infections Network (EIN) were surveyed about current Ebola preparedness at their institutions. Results.  Of 1566 EIN physician members, 869 (55.5%) responded to this survey. Almost all institutions represented in this survey showed a substantial degree of preparation for the management of patients with suspected and confirmed Ebola virus disease. Despite concerns regarding shortages of personal protective equipment, approximately two thirds of all respondents reported that their facilities had sufficient and ready availability of hoods, full body coveralls, and fluid-resistant or impermeable aprons. The majority of respondents indicated preference for transfer of Ebola patients to specialized treatment centers rather than caring for them locally. In general, we found that larger hospitals and teaching hospitals reported higher levels of preparedness. Conclusions.  Prior to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's plan for a tiered approach that identified specific roles for frontline, assessment, and designated treatment facilities, our query of infectious disease physicians suggested that healthcare facilities across the United States were making preparations for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of Ebola patients. Nevertheless, respondents from some hospitals indicated that they were relatively unprepared.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Percentage of facilities that had tested a patient for Ebola by (A) number of beds and (B) type of hospital, October 21–November 11, 2014.
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OFV087F1: Percentage of facilities that had tested a patient for Ebola by (A) number of beds and (B) type of hospital, October 21–November 11, 2014.

Mentions: Of 726 infectious disease physicians involved in inpatient care or aware of their hospital's Ebola planning, only 94 (13%) respondents reported that a patient in their hospital had been tested for Ebola in the previous 3 months. Respondents at smaller hospitals were significantly less likely to report patient testing for Ebola (P = .0003; see Figure 1), and testing a patient for Ebola also varied by type of hospital (P < .0001). For the 94 (13%) respondents reporting at least 1 patient being tested, we received 68 open-text-field responses for alternative clinical diagnoses that explained their symptoms, and these represented a wide range of conditions. Alternative reported diagnoses included malaria (n = 40), upper respiratory infection (n = 10), gastroenteritis/traveler's diarrhea (5), undifferentiated febrile illness (n = 4), psychiatric illness or erroneous history (n = 3), typhoid (n = 2), and other (n = 4).Figure 1.


Infectious Disease Physician Assessment of Hospital Preparedness for Ebola Virus Disease.

Polgreen PM, Santibanez S, Koonin LM, Rupp ME, Beekmann SE, Del Rio C - Open Forum Infect Dis (2015)

Percentage of facilities that had tested a patient for Ebola by (A) number of beds and (B) type of hospital, October 21–November 11, 2014.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499670&req=5

OFV087F1: Percentage of facilities that had tested a patient for Ebola by (A) number of beds and (B) type of hospital, October 21–November 11, 2014.
Mentions: Of 726 infectious disease physicians involved in inpatient care or aware of their hospital's Ebola planning, only 94 (13%) respondents reported that a patient in their hospital had been tested for Ebola in the previous 3 months. Respondents at smaller hospitals were significantly less likely to report patient testing for Ebola (P = .0003; see Figure 1), and testing a patient for Ebola also varied by type of hospital (P < .0001). For the 94 (13%) respondents reporting at least 1 patient being tested, we received 68 open-text-field responses for alternative clinical diagnoses that explained their symptoms, and these represented a wide range of conditions. Alternative reported diagnoses included malaria (n = 40), upper respiratory infection (n = 10), gastroenteritis/traveler's diarrhea (5), undifferentiated febrile illness (n = 4), psychiatric illness or erroneous history (n = 3), typhoid (n = 2), and other (n = 4).Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The majority of respondents indicated preference for transfer of Ebola patients to specialized treatment centers rather than caring for them locally.In general, we found that larger hospitals and teaching hospitals reported higher levels of preparedness.Nevertheless, respondents from some hospitals indicated that they were relatively unprepared.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Emerging Infections Network , University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine , Iowa City, Iowa.

ABSTRACT
Background.  The first case of Ebola diagnosed in the United States and subsequent cases among 2 healthcare workers caring for that patient highlighted the importance of hospital preparedness in caring for Ebola patients. Methods.  From October 21, 2014 to November 11, 2014, infectious disease physicians who are part of the Emerging Infections Network (EIN) were surveyed about current Ebola preparedness at their institutions. Results.  Of 1566 EIN physician members, 869 (55.5%) responded to this survey. Almost all institutions represented in this survey showed a substantial degree of preparation for the management of patients with suspected and confirmed Ebola virus disease. Despite concerns regarding shortages of personal protective equipment, approximately two thirds of all respondents reported that their facilities had sufficient and ready availability of hoods, full body coveralls, and fluid-resistant or impermeable aprons. The majority of respondents indicated preference for transfer of Ebola patients to specialized treatment centers rather than caring for them locally. In general, we found that larger hospitals and teaching hospitals reported higher levels of preparedness. Conclusions.  Prior to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's plan for a tiered approach that identified specific roles for frontline, assessment, and designated treatment facilities, our query of infectious disease physicians suggested that healthcare facilities across the United States were making preparations for screening, diagnosis, and treatment of Ebola patients. Nevertheless, respondents from some hospitals indicated that they were relatively unprepared.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus