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Zerumbone, Sesquiterpene Photochemical from Ginger, Inhibits Angiogenesis.

Park JH, Park GM, Kim JK - Korean J. Physiol. Pharmacol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Zerumbone inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration and tubule formation, as well as angiogenic activity by rat aorta explants.In particular, zerumbone inhibited phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1, which are key regulators of endothelial cell function and angiogenesis.Overall, these results suggest that zerumbone inhibits various attributes of angiogenesis, which might contribute to its reported antitumor effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan 712-702, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Here, we investigated the role of zerumbone, a natural cyclic sesquiterpene of Zingiber zerumbet Smith, on angiogenesis using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Zerumbone inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration and tubule formation, as well as angiogenic activity by rat aorta explants. In particular, zerumbone inhibited phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1, which are key regulators of endothelial cell function and angiogenesis. In vivo matrigel plug assay in mice demonstrated significant decrease in vascularization and hemoglobin content in the plugs from zerumbone-treated mice, compared with control mice. Overall, these results suggest that zerumbone inhibits various attributes of angiogenesis, which might contribute to its reported antitumor effects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of zerumbone in vivo angiogenesis by matrigel plug assay. (A) Matrigel containing mouse VEGF (100 ng/ml), mouse bFGF (100 ng/ml), and zerumbone was subcutaneously injected into C57BL/6J mice. After 7 days, matrigels ware removed and photographed. (B) Paraffin sections of matrigel plugs were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Original magnification, ×100; Scale bar 100 µm. (C) The quantification of neovascularization on the matrigel was performed by measuring the hemoglobin content. The results are reported as the mean±SEM of three independent experiments. Statistical significance is based on the difference when compared with non-treated animals, **p<0.01, ***p<0.001.
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Figure 5: Effects of zerumbone in vivo angiogenesis by matrigel plug assay. (A) Matrigel containing mouse VEGF (100 ng/ml), mouse bFGF (100 ng/ml), and zerumbone was subcutaneously injected into C57BL/6J mice. After 7 days, matrigels ware removed and photographed. (B) Paraffin sections of matrigel plugs were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Original magnification, ×100; Scale bar 100 µm. (C) The quantification of neovascularization on the matrigel was performed by measuring the hemoglobin content. The results are reported as the mean±SEM of three independent experiments. Statistical significance is based on the difference when compared with non-treated animals, **p<0.01, ***p<0.001.

Mentions: To further examine the anti-angiogenic effects of zerumbone in vivo, we tested its effects using the mouse matrigel plug neovascularization assay. C57BL/6 mice received subcutaneous matrigel containing angiogenic factors (VEGF, bFGF and heparin) in the absence or presence of zerumbone. After 7 days, the plugs were removed and matrigel hemoglobin content was measured. The positive control group (VEGF, bFGF and heparin) displayed extensive neovascularization of the matrigel, as shown by the red color distributed in the whole plug (Figs. 5A, 5B). In contrast, matrigel implants treated with both angiogenic factor and zerumbone (200 µM) displayed strong inhibition of vascular development similar to that of the negative control (matrigel alone). In addition, H&E staining showed that the presence of red blood cells was markedly reduced in the zerumbone-containing plug (Fig. 5C). This observed in vivo anti-angiogenic activity was consistent with the in vitro anti-angiogenic effect of zerumbone.


Zerumbone, Sesquiterpene Photochemical from Ginger, Inhibits Angiogenesis.

Park JH, Park GM, Kim JK - Korean J. Physiol. Pharmacol. (2015)

Effects of zerumbone in vivo angiogenesis by matrigel plug assay. (A) Matrigel containing mouse VEGF (100 ng/ml), mouse bFGF (100 ng/ml), and zerumbone was subcutaneously injected into C57BL/6J mice. After 7 days, matrigels ware removed and photographed. (B) Paraffin sections of matrigel plugs were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Original magnification, ×100; Scale bar 100 µm. (C) The quantification of neovascularization on the matrigel was performed by measuring the hemoglobin content. The results are reported as the mean±SEM of three independent experiments. Statistical significance is based on the difference when compared with non-treated animals, **p<0.01, ***p<0.001.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499645&req=5

Figure 5: Effects of zerumbone in vivo angiogenesis by matrigel plug assay. (A) Matrigel containing mouse VEGF (100 ng/ml), mouse bFGF (100 ng/ml), and zerumbone was subcutaneously injected into C57BL/6J mice. After 7 days, matrigels ware removed and photographed. (B) Paraffin sections of matrigel plugs were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Original magnification, ×100; Scale bar 100 µm. (C) The quantification of neovascularization on the matrigel was performed by measuring the hemoglobin content. The results are reported as the mean±SEM of three independent experiments. Statistical significance is based on the difference when compared with non-treated animals, **p<0.01, ***p<0.001.
Mentions: To further examine the anti-angiogenic effects of zerumbone in vivo, we tested its effects using the mouse matrigel plug neovascularization assay. C57BL/6 mice received subcutaneous matrigel containing angiogenic factors (VEGF, bFGF and heparin) in the absence or presence of zerumbone. After 7 days, the plugs were removed and matrigel hemoglobin content was measured. The positive control group (VEGF, bFGF and heparin) displayed extensive neovascularization of the matrigel, as shown by the red color distributed in the whole plug (Figs. 5A, 5B). In contrast, matrigel implants treated with both angiogenic factor and zerumbone (200 µM) displayed strong inhibition of vascular development similar to that of the negative control (matrigel alone). In addition, H&E staining showed that the presence of red blood cells was markedly reduced in the zerumbone-containing plug (Fig. 5C). This observed in vivo anti-angiogenic activity was consistent with the in vitro anti-angiogenic effect of zerumbone.

Bottom Line: Zerumbone inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration and tubule formation, as well as angiogenic activity by rat aorta explants.In particular, zerumbone inhibited phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1, which are key regulators of endothelial cell function and angiogenesis.Overall, these results suggest that zerumbone inhibits various attributes of angiogenesis, which might contribute to its reported antitumor effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Science, Catholic University of Daegu, Gyeongsan 712-702, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Here, we investigated the role of zerumbone, a natural cyclic sesquiterpene of Zingiber zerumbet Smith, on angiogenesis using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Zerumbone inhibited HUVECs proliferation, migration and tubule formation, as well as angiogenic activity by rat aorta explants. In particular, zerumbone inhibited phosphorylation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 and fibroblast growth factor receptor-1, which are key regulators of endothelial cell function and angiogenesis. In vivo matrigel plug assay in mice demonstrated significant decrease in vascularization and hemoglobin content in the plugs from zerumbone-treated mice, compared with control mice. Overall, these results suggest that zerumbone inhibits various attributes of angiogenesis, which might contribute to its reported antitumor effects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus