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Lung Disease Caused by Mycobacterium malmoense in an Immunocompetent Patient.

Jeon MK, Yoon JA, Kim J, Yi S, Sung H, Shim TS, Jo KW - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Bottom Line: Mycobacterium malmoense is a very rare cause of lung disease in South Korea.We reported the first case of lung disease caused by M. malmoense in an immunocompetent patient.The patient was successfully treated with a 14-month course of antibiotics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Mycobacterium malmoense is a very rare cause of lung disease in South Korea. We reported the first case of lung disease caused by M. malmoense in an immunocompetent patient. The patient was successfully treated with a 14-month course of antibiotics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chest X-ray taken 7 years earlier showing parenchymal destruction, fibrotic lesions, and bullous changes in the right upper lung field caused by a previous episode of pulmonary tuberculosis.
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Figure 1: Chest X-ray taken 7 years earlier showing parenchymal destruction, fibrotic lesions, and bullous changes in the right upper lung field caused by a previous episode of pulmonary tuberculosis.

Mentions: A 66-year-old man visited our hospital, Asan Medical Center, due to a cough persisting for 5 months. Seven years earlier, he had been treated for pan-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), which lasted for 9 months. This treatment was successful but a chest X-ray (CXR) at the time of treatment completion showed parenchymal destructive lesions, with fibrotic changes in the right upper lung field (Figure 1). He also suffered from a mild chronic cough. He remained relatively well thereafter. A CXR taken about 1 year earlier showed no significant changes in the TB-destroyed lung. However, his cough became aggravated 6 months prior to presentation at our clinic.


Lung Disease Caused by Mycobacterium malmoense in an Immunocompetent Patient.

Jeon MK, Yoon JA, Kim J, Yi S, Sung H, Shim TS, Jo KW - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Chest X-ray taken 7 years earlier showing parenchymal destruction, fibrotic lesions, and bullous changes in the right upper lung field caused by a previous episode of pulmonary tuberculosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499603&req=5

Figure 1: Chest X-ray taken 7 years earlier showing parenchymal destruction, fibrotic lesions, and bullous changes in the right upper lung field caused by a previous episode of pulmonary tuberculosis.
Mentions: A 66-year-old man visited our hospital, Asan Medical Center, due to a cough persisting for 5 months. Seven years earlier, he had been treated for pan-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), which lasted for 9 months. This treatment was successful but a chest X-ray (CXR) at the time of treatment completion showed parenchymal destructive lesions, with fibrotic changes in the right upper lung field (Figure 1). He also suffered from a mild chronic cough. He remained relatively well thereafter. A CXR taken about 1 year earlier showed no significant changes in the TB-destroyed lung. However, his cough became aggravated 6 months prior to presentation at our clinic.

Bottom Line: Mycobacterium malmoense is a very rare cause of lung disease in South Korea.We reported the first case of lung disease caused by M. malmoense in an immunocompetent patient.The patient was successfully treated with a 14-month course of antibiotics.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Mycobacterium malmoense is a very rare cause of lung disease in South Korea. We reported the first case of lung disease caused by M. malmoense in an immunocompetent patient. The patient was successfully treated with a 14-month course of antibiotics.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus