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A Case of Pulmonary Cryptococcosis in an Immunocompetent Male Patient Diagnosed by a Percutaneous Supraclavicular Lymph Node Biopsy.

Sung JH, Kim do H, Oh MJ, Lee KJ, Bae YA, Kwon KW, Lee SM, Kang HJ, Choi J - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Bottom Line: Cryptococcal pneumonia usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with malignancy, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, organ transplantations, immunosuppressive chemotherapies, catheter insertion, or dialysis.It can be diagnosed by gaining tissues in lung parenchyma or detecting antigen in blood or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.We treated him with fluconazole at 400 mg/day for 9 months according to the guideline.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Cryptococcal pneumonia usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with malignancy, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, organ transplantations, immunosuppressive chemotherapies, catheter insertion, or dialysis. It can be diagnosed by gaining tissues in lung parenchyma or detecting antigen in blood or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Here we report an immunocompetent 32-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus diagnosed with cryptococcal pneumonia after a ultrasound-guided percutaneous supraclavicular lymph node core needle biopsy. We treated him with fluconazole at 400 mg/day for 9 months according to the guideline. This is the first case that cryptococcal pneumonia was diagnosed from a percutaneous lymph node biopsy in South Korea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Initial lung images. (A) Initial chest radiograph showing diffuse reticulonodular opacities in both lungs. (B) Initial chest computed tomography (CT) scan shows innumerable small nodules, interstitial thickening, and ground glass attenuation in both lungs. Note small bilateral pleural effusions. Both hilar regions are enlarged, representing lymphadenopathy. (C) Chest CT mediastinal window setting coronal image showing enlarged lymph nodes in both supraclavicular areas, both mediastinal, interlobar, and subcarinal areas.
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Figure 1: Initial lung images. (A) Initial chest radiograph showing diffuse reticulonodular opacities in both lungs. (B) Initial chest computed tomography (CT) scan shows innumerable small nodules, interstitial thickening, and ground glass attenuation in both lungs. Note small bilateral pleural effusions. Both hilar regions are enlarged, representing lymphadenopathy. (C) Chest CT mediastinal window setting coronal image showing enlarged lymph nodes in both supraclavicular areas, both mediastinal, interlobar, and subcarinal areas.

Mentions: Chest radiograph and CT scans of the chest revealed innumerable small lung nodules, interlobular septal thickening, airspace consolidation in both lungs with pleural effusion and enlarged lymph nodes in supraclavicular, mediastinal, hilar, interlobar, subcarinal, and paraesophageal areas bilaterally (Figure 1).


A Case of Pulmonary Cryptococcosis in an Immunocompetent Male Patient Diagnosed by a Percutaneous Supraclavicular Lymph Node Biopsy.

Sung JH, Kim do H, Oh MJ, Lee KJ, Bae YA, Kwon KW, Lee SM, Kang HJ, Choi J - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Initial lung images. (A) Initial chest radiograph showing diffuse reticulonodular opacities in both lungs. (B) Initial chest computed tomography (CT) scan shows innumerable small nodules, interstitial thickening, and ground glass attenuation in both lungs. Note small bilateral pleural effusions. Both hilar regions are enlarged, representing lymphadenopathy. (C) Chest CT mediastinal window setting coronal image showing enlarged lymph nodes in both supraclavicular areas, both mediastinal, interlobar, and subcarinal areas.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499599&req=5

Figure 1: Initial lung images. (A) Initial chest radiograph showing diffuse reticulonodular opacities in both lungs. (B) Initial chest computed tomography (CT) scan shows innumerable small nodules, interstitial thickening, and ground glass attenuation in both lungs. Note small bilateral pleural effusions. Both hilar regions are enlarged, representing lymphadenopathy. (C) Chest CT mediastinal window setting coronal image showing enlarged lymph nodes in both supraclavicular areas, both mediastinal, interlobar, and subcarinal areas.
Mentions: Chest radiograph and CT scans of the chest revealed innumerable small lung nodules, interlobular septal thickening, airspace consolidation in both lungs with pleural effusion and enlarged lymph nodes in supraclavicular, mediastinal, hilar, interlobar, subcarinal, and paraesophageal areas bilaterally (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Cryptococcal pneumonia usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with malignancy, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, organ transplantations, immunosuppressive chemotherapies, catheter insertion, or dialysis.It can be diagnosed by gaining tissues in lung parenchyma or detecting antigen in blood or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.We treated him with fluconazole at 400 mg/day for 9 months according to the guideline.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Bundang Jesaeng General Hospital, Seongnam, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Cryptococcal pneumonia usually occurs in immunocompromised patients with malignancy, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, organ transplantations, immunosuppressive chemotherapies, catheter insertion, or dialysis. It can be diagnosed by gaining tissues in lung parenchyma or detecting antigen in blood or bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Here we report an immunocompetent 32-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus diagnosed with cryptococcal pneumonia after a ultrasound-guided percutaneous supraclavicular lymph node core needle biopsy. We treated him with fluconazole at 400 mg/day for 9 months according to the guideline. This is the first case that cryptococcal pneumonia was diagnosed from a percutaneous lymph node biopsy in South Korea.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus