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First Outcome of MDR-TB among Co-Infected HIV/TB Patients from South-West Iran.

Motamedifar M, Ebrahim-Saraie HS, Abadi AR, Moghadam MN - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Bottom Line: The aims of the present study were to determine the frequency of HIV/TB co-infection and other probable associated factors.Of the overall TB infected patients, 6 cases (10.2%) showed multidrug-resistant with the mean CD4+ lymphocyte count of 163±166 cells/mm(3).The main clinical forms of TB were pulmonary (73%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bacteriology & Virology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. ; Shiraz HIV/AIDS Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Science, Shiraz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and the majority of them occur in developing countries. The aims of the present study were to determine the frequency of HIV/TB co-infection and other probable associated factors.

Methods: This 10 year retrospective study was conducted on 824 HIV patients in the south-west of Iran. HIV infection was diagnosed by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and confirmed by Western blot. TB diagnosis was based on consistency of the clinical manifestations, chest X-ray, and microscopic examination. Drug susceptibility testing was done by the proportional method on Löwenstein-Jensen media.

Results: Of 824 HIV patients, 59 (7.2%) were identified as TB co-infected and the majority (86.4%) of them were male. Of the overall TB infected patients, 6 cases (10.2%) showed multidrug-resistant with the mean CD4+ lymphocyte count of 163±166 cells/mm(3). The main clinical forms of TB were pulmonary (73%). There was a significant (p<0.05) correlation between TB infection and CD4+ lymphocyte counts ≤200 cells/mm(3), gender, prison history, addiction history, and highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

Conclusion: We reported novel information on frequency of HIV/TB co-infection and multidrug resistant-TB outcome among co-infected patients that could facilitate better management of such infections on a global scale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The distribution pattern of CD4+ lymphocyte count between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and HIV/tuberculosis (TB) co-infected patients.
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Figure 1: The distribution pattern of CD4+ lymphocyte count between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and HIV/tuberculosis (TB) co-infected patients.

Mentions: In our findings, there were associations between co-infection with TB and CD4+ lymphocyte count, since the rates of CD4+ lymphocyte <200 cells/mm3 were significantly (p=0.03) higher among HIV/TB co-infected patients (35.6%) compared to HIV patients (22.6%). The distribution pattern of CD4+ lymphocyte count between HIV infected and HIV/TB co-infected patients is demonstrated in Figure 1.


First Outcome of MDR-TB among Co-Infected HIV/TB Patients from South-West Iran.

Motamedifar M, Ebrahim-Saraie HS, Abadi AR, Moghadam MN - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

The distribution pattern of CD4+ lymphocyte count between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and HIV/tuberculosis (TB) co-infected patients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499594&req=5

Figure 1: The distribution pattern of CD4+ lymphocyte count between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected and HIV/tuberculosis (TB) co-infected patients.
Mentions: In our findings, there were associations between co-infection with TB and CD4+ lymphocyte count, since the rates of CD4+ lymphocyte <200 cells/mm3 were significantly (p=0.03) higher among HIV/TB co-infected patients (35.6%) compared to HIV patients (22.6%). The distribution pattern of CD4+ lymphocyte count between HIV infected and HIV/TB co-infected patients is demonstrated in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: The aims of the present study were to determine the frequency of HIV/TB co-infection and other probable associated factors.Of the overall TB infected patients, 6 cases (10.2%) showed multidrug-resistant with the mean CD4+ lymphocyte count of 163±166 cells/mm(3).The main clinical forms of TB were pulmonary (73%).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Bacteriology & Virology, School of Medicine, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran. ; Shiraz HIV/AIDS Research Center, Shiraz University of Medical Science, Shiraz, Iran.

ABSTRACT

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and the majority of them occur in developing countries. The aims of the present study were to determine the frequency of HIV/TB co-infection and other probable associated factors.

Methods: This 10 year retrospective study was conducted on 824 HIV patients in the south-west of Iran. HIV infection was diagnosed by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and confirmed by Western blot. TB diagnosis was based on consistency of the clinical manifestations, chest X-ray, and microscopic examination. Drug susceptibility testing was done by the proportional method on Löwenstein-Jensen media.

Results: Of 824 HIV patients, 59 (7.2%) were identified as TB co-infected and the majority (86.4%) of them were male. Of the overall TB infected patients, 6 cases (10.2%) showed multidrug-resistant with the mean CD4+ lymphocyte count of 163±166 cells/mm(3). The main clinical forms of TB were pulmonary (73%). There was a significant (p<0.05) correlation between TB infection and CD4+ lymphocyte counts ≤200 cells/mm(3), gender, prison history, addiction history, and highly active anti-retroviral therapy.

Conclusion: We reported novel information on frequency of HIV/TB co-infection and multidrug resistant-TB outcome among co-infected patients that could facilitate better management of such infections on a global scale.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus