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The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Lymph Node Map: A Radiologic Atlas and Review.

Kim JH, van Beek EJ, Murchison JT, Marin A, Mirsadraee S - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Bottom Line: Accurate lymph node staging of lung cancer is crucial in determining optimal treatment plans and predicting patient outcome.Currently used lymph node maps have been reconciled to the internationally accepted International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) map published in the seventh edition of TNM classification system of malignant tumours.This article provides computed tomographic illustrations of the IASLC nodal map, to facilitate its application in day-to-day clinical practice in order to increase the appropriate classification in lung cancer staging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Chungnam National University, School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Accurate lymph node staging of lung cancer is crucial in determining optimal treatment plans and predicting patient outcome. Currently used lymph node maps have been reconciled to the internationally accepted International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) map published in the seventh edition of TNM classification system of malignant tumours. This article provides computed tomographic illustrations of the IASLC nodal map, to facilitate its application in day-to-day clinical practice in order to increase the appropriate classification in lung cancer staging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Boundary distinction among stations 1, 2 and 3. (A) Station 1 supaclavicular lymph node. (B) Inferior to the lung apex, the yellow line running horizontally from anterior margin of both lung pleura interface separates station 1 from station 3p. (C) At the suprasternal notch, the yellow line running horizontally from anterior margin of both lung pleura interface separates station 1 from station 2. The red line running along posterior wall of trachea separates station 2 from 3p. (D) Station 3a and 3p at the level of tracheal bifurcation (dashed red arrow).
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Figure 4: Boundary distinction among stations 1, 2 and 3. (A) Station 1 supaclavicular lymph node. (B) Inferior to the lung apex, the yellow line running horizontally from anterior margin of both lung pleura interface separates station 1 from station 3p. (C) At the suprasternal notch, the yellow line running horizontally from anterior margin of both lung pleura interface separates station 1 from station 2. The red line running along posterior wall of trachea separates station 2 from 3p. (D) Station 3a and 3p at the level of tracheal bifurcation (dashed red arrow).

Mentions: In the IASLC map definition, the lower border of station 1 is the clavicle bilaterally and, in the midline, the upper border of the manubrium and the upper border of station 2 and 3 extends higher up to the lung apex than the lower border of station 1. Therefore, on axial image, the posterior border of station 1 can abut the anterior border of station 2 or 3p (Figure 4). Because the definitions of the lower border of station 1 nodes are not identical to the definition of the upper border of station 2 and 3 nodes and because the position of the clavicles can vary depending on the level of arm elevation, the inferior-lateral border of station 1 nodes may vary leading to overlap between these nodal groups. The lymph nodes that are closer to the midline are hardly ever affected by the position of the arms11. It would be helpful if the definition of the lower border of station 1 and the upper border of station 2 were identical. This is an improvement, which might be considered for the eighth edition.


The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer Lymph Node Map: A Radiologic Atlas and Review.

Kim JH, van Beek EJ, Murchison JT, Marin A, Mirsadraee S - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Boundary distinction among stations 1, 2 and 3. (A) Station 1 supaclavicular lymph node. (B) Inferior to the lung apex, the yellow line running horizontally from anterior margin of both lung pleura interface separates station 1 from station 3p. (C) At the suprasternal notch, the yellow line running horizontally from anterior margin of both lung pleura interface separates station 1 from station 2. The red line running along posterior wall of trachea separates station 2 from 3p. (D) Station 3a and 3p at the level of tracheal bifurcation (dashed red arrow).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499584&req=5

Figure 4: Boundary distinction among stations 1, 2 and 3. (A) Station 1 supaclavicular lymph node. (B) Inferior to the lung apex, the yellow line running horizontally from anterior margin of both lung pleura interface separates station 1 from station 3p. (C) At the suprasternal notch, the yellow line running horizontally from anterior margin of both lung pleura interface separates station 1 from station 2. The red line running along posterior wall of trachea separates station 2 from 3p. (D) Station 3a and 3p at the level of tracheal bifurcation (dashed red arrow).
Mentions: In the IASLC map definition, the lower border of station 1 is the clavicle bilaterally and, in the midline, the upper border of the manubrium and the upper border of station 2 and 3 extends higher up to the lung apex than the lower border of station 1. Therefore, on axial image, the posterior border of station 1 can abut the anterior border of station 2 or 3p (Figure 4). Because the definitions of the lower border of station 1 nodes are not identical to the definition of the upper border of station 2 and 3 nodes and because the position of the clavicles can vary depending on the level of arm elevation, the inferior-lateral border of station 1 nodes may vary leading to overlap between these nodal groups. The lymph nodes that are closer to the midline are hardly ever affected by the position of the arms11. It would be helpful if the definition of the lower border of station 1 and the upper border of station 2 were identical. This is an improvement, which might be considered for the eighth edition.

Bottom Line: Accurate lymph node staging of lung cancer is crucial in determining optimal treatment plans and predicting patient outcome.Currently used lymph node maps have been reconciled to the internationally accepted International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) map published in the seventh edition of TNM classification system of malignant tumours.This article provides computed tomographic illustrations of the IASLC nodal map, to facilitate its application in day-to-day clinical practice in order to increase the appropriate classification in lung cancer staging.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Chungnam National University, School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Accurate lymph node staging of lung cancer is crucial in determining optimal treatment plans and predicting patient outcome. Currently used lymph node maps have been reconciled to the internationally accepted International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) map published in the seventh edition of TNM classification system of malignant tumours. This article provides computed tomographic illustrations of the IASLC nodal map, to facilitate its application in day-to-day clinical practice in order to increase the appropriate classification in lung cancer staging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus