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Anomalous External Carotid Artery-Internal Carotid Artery Anastomosis in Two Patients with Proximal Internal Carotid Arterial Remnants.

Kim CH, Cho YD, Kang HS, Kim JE, Jung SC, Ahn JH, Han MH - Korean J Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: The ICA remnant of one patient (identifiable immediately upon bifurcation of the common carotid artery) was hypoplastic, and that of the other patient was an occluded arterial stump.These features are not typical of non-bifurcating ICA.The occipital artery originated from an anomalous connection in one instance and from the main trunk of the ECA (just past the ECA-ICA connection) in the other.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Stroke Center, Myongji Hospital, Goyang 412-270, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Two angiographic instances of anomalous external carotid artery (ECA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) anastomosis are described, each occurring at the C2-3 level and bearing remnants of proximal ICA. The ICA remnant of one patient (identifiable immediately upon bifurcation of the common carotid artery) was hypoplastic, and that of the other patient was an occluded arterial stump. These features are not typical of non-bifurcating ICA. The occipital artery originated from an anomalous connection in one instance and from the main trunk of the ECA (just past the ECA-ICA connection) in the other.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

44-year-old man with anomalous ECA-ICA anastomosis and hypoplastic proximal ICA.A, B. Frontal (A) and lateral (B) angiographic images showing anomalous ECA-ICA anastomosis at C2-3 spinal level and relatively hypoplastic proximal ICA at expected site of ICA origin. Anomalous anastomosis (white arrow), hypoplastic proximal ICA (arrowhead), and occipital artery (black arrow). ECA = external carotid artery, ICA = internal carotid artery
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Figure 1: 44-year-old man with anomalous ECA-ICA anastomosis and hypoplastic proximal ICA.A, B. Frontal (A) and lateral (B) angiographic images showing anomalous ECA-ICA anastomosis at C2-3 spinal level and relatively hypoplastic proximal ICA at expected site of ICA origin. Anomalous anastomosis (white arrow), hypoplastic proximal ICA (arrowhead), and occipital artery (black arrow). ECA = external carotid artery, ICA = internal carotid artery

Mentions: A 44-year-old male presented with a brief loss of consciousness one month prior. He was neurologically intact at the first outpatient clinic visit. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed a suspicious cerebral aneurysm of the right A2 segment. A diagnostic cerebral angiography was performed to improve the diagnostic accuracy and to devise a therapeutic plan, and it revealed an unusual variation at the cervical segment of the carotid artery, in addition to a 5-mm right A2 aneurysm. An anomalous ECA-ICA anastomosis was identified at the C2-3 level, accompanied by a hypoplastic C4-level proximal ICA (viewed as a remnant of the normally originating ICA). The occipital artery was seen to originate from the anomalous vessel (Fig. 1). The cranial distribution of the ICA distal to the anomalous connection was otherwise normal. Coil embolization of the A2 aneurysm was planned.


Anomalous External Carotid Artery-Internal Carotid Artery Anastomosis in Two Patients with Proximal Internal Carotid Arterial Remnants.

Kim CH, Cho YD, Kang HS, Kim JE, Jung SC, Ahn JH, Han MH - Korean J Radiol (2015)

44-year-old man with anomalous ECA-ICA anastomosis and hypoplastic proximal ICA.A, B. Frontal (A) and lateral (B) angiographic images showing anomalous ECA-ICA anastomosis at C2-3 spinal level and relatively hypoplastic proximal ICA at expected site of ICA origin. Anomalous anastomosis (white arrow), hypoplastic proximal ICA (arrowhead), and occipital artery (black arrow). ECA = external carotid artery, ICA = internal carotid artery
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499558&req=5

Figure 1: 44-year-old man with anomalous ECA-ICA anastomosis and hypoplastic proximal ICA.A, B. Frontal (A) and lateral (B) angiographic images showing anomalous ECA-ICA anastomosis at C2-3 spinal level and relatively hypoplastic proximal ICA at expected site of ICA origin. Anomalous anastomosis (white arrow), hypoplastic proximal ICA (arrowhead), and occipital artery (black arrow). ECA = external carotid artery, ICA = internal carotid artery
Mentions: A 44-year-old male presented with a brief loss of consciousness one month prior. He was neurologically intact at the first outpatient clinic visit. Magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) showed a suspicious cerebral aneurysm of the right A2 segment. A diagnostic cerebral angiography was performed to improve the diagnostic accuracy and to devise a therapeutic plan, and it revealed an unusual variation at the cervical segment of the carotid artery, in addition to a 5-mm right A2 aneurysm. An anomalous ECA-ICA anastomosis was identified at the C2-3 level, accompanied by a hypoplastic C4-level proximal ICA (viewed as a remnant of the normally originating ICA). The occipital artery was seen to originate from the anomalous vessel (Fig. 1). The cranial distribution of the ICA distal to the anomalous connection was otherwise normal. Coil embolization of the A2 aneurysm was planned.

Bottom Line: The ICA remnant of one patient (identifiable immediately upon bifurcation of the common carotid artery) was hypoplastic, and that of the other patient was an occluded arterial stump.These features are not typical of non-bifurcating ICA.The occipital artery originated from an anomalous connection in one instance and from the main trunk of the ECA (just past the ECA-ICA connection) in the other.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Stroke Center, Myongji Hospital, Goyang 412-270, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Two angiographic instances of anomalous external carotid artery (ECA) and internal carotid artery (ICA) anastomosis are described, each occurring at the C2-3 level and bearing remnants of proximal ICA. The ICA remnant of one patient (identifiable immediately upon bifurcation of the common carotid artery) was hypoplastic, and that of the other patient was an occluded arterial stump. These features are not typical of non-bifurcating ICA. The occipital artery originated from an anomalous connection in one instance and from the main trunk of the ECA (just past the ECA-ICA connection) in the other.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus