Limits...
Fluoroscopy-Guided Lumbar Drainage of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Patients in Whom a Blind Beside Approach Is Difficult.

Chee CG, Lee GY, Lee JW, Lee E, Kang HS - Korean J Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: The definitions of technical success, clinical success, and complications were defined prior to the study.The technical and clinical success rates were 99.0% (95/96) and 89.6% (86/96), respectively.Nine cases of minor complications and eight major complications were observed, including seven cases of meningitis, and one retained catheter requiring surgical removal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the rates of technical success, clinical success, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of our hospital, and informed consent was waived. Ninety-six procedures on 60 consecutive patients performed July 2008 to December 2013 were evaluated. The patients were referred for the fluoroscopy-guided procedure due to failed attempts at a bedside approach, a history of lumbar surgery, difficulty cooperating, or obesity. Fluoroscopy-guided lumbar drainage procedures were performed in the lateral decubitus position with a midline puncture of L3/4 in the interspinous space. The catheter tip was positioned at the T12/L1 level, and the catheter was visualized on contrast agent-aided fluoroscopy. A standard angiography system with a rotatable C-arm was used. The definitions of technical success, clinical success, and complications were defined prior to the study.

Results: The technical and clinical success rates were 99.0% (95/96) and 89.6% (86/96), respectively. The mean hospital stay for an external lumbar drain was 4.84 days. Nine cases of minor complications and eight major complications were observed, including seven cases of meningitis, and one retained catheter requiring surgical removal.

Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided external lumbar drainage is a technically reliable procedure in difficult patients with failed attempts at a bedside procedure, history of lumbar surgery, difficulties in cooperation, or obesity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Malpositioning of catheter tip.Contrast filling was only seen near puncture site at lumbar spine level (dashed arrow) and not at thoracolumbar junction via obtuse-angled catheter (arrow) on follow-up myelogram of 65-year-old male patient with inefficient cerebrospinal fluid drainage day after fluoroscopic-guided lumbar drainage. Malpositioning of catheter tip with loop was suspected in this patient, and patient was discharged without complications after re-inserting catheter.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499551&req=5

Figure 3: Malpositioning of catheter tip.Contrast filling was only seen near puncture site at lumbar spine level (dashed arrow) and not at thoracolumbar junction via obtuse-angled catheter (arrow) on follow-up myelogram of 65-year-old male patient with inefficient cerebrospinal fluid drainage day after fluoroscopic-guided lumbar drainage. Malpositioning of catheter tip with loop was suspected in this patient, and patient was discharged without complications after re-inserting catheter.

Mentions: The technical success rate was 99.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 94.3-99.8%), and the clinical success rate was 89.6% (95% CI, 81.9-94.2%). On case of technical failure was encountered as a loop that formed in the catheter (Fig. 3), which was detected the day after the procedure. The catheter was removed and successfully re-inserted without any complications.


Fluoroscopy-Guided Lumbar Drainage of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Patients in Whom a Blind Beside Approach Is Difficult.

Chee CG, Lee GY, Lee JW, Lee E, Kang HS - Korean J Radiol (2015)

Malpositioning of catheter tip.Contrast filling was only seen near puncture site at lumbar spine level (dashed arrow) and not at thoracolumbar junction via obtuse-angled catheter (arrow) on follow-up myelogram of 65-year-old male patient with inefficient cerebrospinal fluid drainage day after fluoroscopic-guided lumbar drainage. Malpositioning of catheter tip with loop was suspected in this patient, and patient was discharged without complications after re-inserting catheter.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499551&req=5

Figure 3: Malpositioning of catheter tip.Contrast filling was only seen near puncture site at lumbar spine level (dashed arrow) and not at thoracolumbar junction via obtuse-angled catheter (arrow) on follow-up myelogram of 65-year-old male patient with inefficient cerebrospinal fluid drainage day after fluoroscopic-guided lumbar drainage. Malpositioning of catheter tip with loop was suspected in this patient, and patient was discharged without complications after re-inserting catheter.
Mentions: The technical success rate was 99.0% (95% confidence interval [CI], 94.3-99.8%), and the clinical success rate was 89.6% (95% CI, 81.9-94.2%). On case of technical failure was encountered as a loop that formed in the catheter (Fig. 3), which was detected the day after the procedure. The catheter was removed and successfully re-inserted without any complications.

Bottom Line: The definitions of technical success, clinical success, and complications were defined prior to the study.The technical and clinical success rates were 99.0% (95/96) and 89.6% (86/96), respectively.Nine cases of minor complications and eight major complications were observed, including seven cases of meningitis, and one retained catheter requiring surgical removal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam 463-707, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the rates of technical success, clinical success, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage.

Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of our hospital, and informed consent was waived. Ninety-six procedures on 60 consecutive patients performed July 2008 to December 2013 were evaluated. The patients were referred for the fluoroscopy-guided procedure due to failed attempts at a bedside approach, a history of lumbar surgery, difficulty cooperating, or obesity. Fluoroscopy-guided lumbar drainage procedures were performed in the lateral decubitus position with a midline puncture of L3/4 in the interspinous space. The catheter tip was positioned at the T12/L1 level, and the catheter was visualized on contrast agent-aided fluoroscopy. A standard angiography system with a rotatable C-arm was used. The definitions of technical success, clinical success, and complications were defined prior to the study.

Results: The technical and clinical success rates were 99.0% (95/96) and 89.6% (86/96), respectively. The mean hospital stay for an external lumbar drain was 4.84 days. Nine cases of minor complications and eight major complications were observed, including seven cases of meningitis, and one retained catheter requiring surgical removal.

Conclusion: Fluoroscopy-guided external lumbar drainage is a technically reliable procedure in difficult patients with failed attempts at a bedside procedure, history of lumbar surgery, difficulties in cooperation, or obesity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus