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Ultrasonography-Based Thyroidal and Perithyroidal Anatomy and Its Clinical Significance.

Ha EJ, Baek JH, Lee JH - Korean J Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential.Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures.Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-380, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Ultrasonography (US)-guided procedures such as ethanol ablation, radiofrequency ablation, laser ablation, selective nerve block, and core needle biopsy have been widely applied in the diagnosis and management of thyroid and neck lesions. For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential. However, most previous reports evaluated neck anatomy based on cadavers, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging rather than US. Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures. Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Transverse ultrasonography images of C6 and C7 transverse process.A. Anterior tubercle (AT) of C6 transverse process is prominent. B. AT of C7 transverse process is absent. PT = posterior tubercle
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Figure 20: Transverse ultrasonography images of C6 and C7 transverse process.A. Anterior tubercle (AT) of C6 transverse process is prominent. B. AT of C7 transverse process is absent. PT = posterior tubercle

Mentions: The vertebrae are anatomical landmarks to locate the cervical and brachial plexus. Therefore, recognizing the bony structures on US images is helpful for identifying and assessing the level of the nerve roots. The absence of the anterior tubercle of the C7 transverse process and prominence of those of the C6 transverse process (Chassaignac tubercle) are used as anatomic landmarks for the identification of the cervical vertebra level (Fig. 20) (62). The transverse process of C2-5 can be identified as successive steps cranial to the C6 level. The anterior tubercle of the transverse process can be misdiagnosed as a calcified lymph node; however, it can be easily differentiated by rotating the probe and checking the successive features on longitudinal view. Vertebral injury can occur during CNB for thyroid and neck lesions, and a safe distance should be measured from the needle tip before the procedure.


Ultrasonography-Based Thyroidal and Perithyroidal Anatomy and Its Clinical Significance.

Ha EJ, Baek JH, Lee JH - Korean J Radiol (2015)

Transverse ultrasonography images of C6 and C7 transverse process.A. Anterior tubercle (AT) of C6 transverse process is prominent. B. AT of C7 transverse process is absent. PT = posterior tubercle
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499539&req=5

Figure 20: Transverse ultrasonography images of C6 and C7 transverse process.A. Anterior tubercle (AT) of C6 transverse process is prominent. B. AT of C7 transverse process is absent. PT = posterior tubercle
Mentions: The vertebrae are anatomical landmarks to locate the cervical and brachial plexus. Therefore, recognizing the bony structures on US images is helpful for identifying and assessing the level of the nerve roots. The absence of the anterior tubercle of the C7 transverse process and prominence of those of the C6 transverse process (Chassaignac tubercle) are used as anatomic landmarks for the identification of the cervical vertebra level (Fig. 20) (62). The transverse process of C2-5 can be identified as successive steps cranial to the C6 level. The anterior tubercle of the transverse process can be misdiagnosed as a calcified lymph node; however, it can be easily differentiated by rotating the probe and checking the successive features on longitudinal view. Vertebral injury can occur during CNB for thyroid and neck lesions, and a safe distance should be measured from the needle tip before the procedure.

Bottom Line: For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential.Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures.Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-380, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Ultrasonography (US)-guided procedures such as ethanol ablation, radiofrequency ablation, laser ablation, selective nerve block, and core needle biopsy have been widely applied in the diagnosis and management of thyroid and neck lesions. For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential. However, most previous reports evaluated neck anatomy based on cadavers, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging rather than US. Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures. Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

No MeSH data available.