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Ultrasonography-Based Thyroidal and Perithyroidal Anatomy and Its Clinical Significance.

Ha EJ, Baek JH, Lee JH - Korean J Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential.Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures.Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-380, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Ultrasonography (US)-guided procedures such as ethanol ablation, radiofrequency ablation, laser ablation, selective nerve block, and core needle biopsy have been widely applied in the diagnosis and management of thyroid and neck lesions. For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential. However, most previous reports evaluated neck anatomy based on cadavers, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging rather than US. Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures. Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Relationship of recurrent laryngeal nerves to adjacent anatomic structures.A. Schematic drawing shows location of recurrent laryngeal nerve (arrows). B. Although recurrent laryngeal nerve is not directly visualized on ultrasonography, its location can be expected in tracheoesophageal groove (arrows).
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Figure 5: Relationship of recurrent laryngeal nerves to adjacent anatomic structures.A. Schematic drawing shows location of recurrent laryngeal nerve (arrows). B. Although recurrent laryngeal nerve is not directly visualized on ultrasonography, its location can be expected in tracheoesophageal groove (arrows).

Mentions: The RLN is a branch of the vagus nerve that supplies the intrinsic muscles of the larynx. The RLN is not directly visualized on US due to its small diameter. Therefore, knowledge of its expected course and variation is essential to prevent complications during the procedures (Fig. 5). The right and left RLNs are not symmetrical in course, with the left nerve looping under the aortic arch and the right nerve traveling directly upwards after curving below the subclavian artery. At the level of the neck, they are located in the tracheoesophageal groove, passing posteromedially to both lobes of the thyroid. They then penetrate the larynx posterior to the cricoarytenoid joints at the level of the thyroid cartilage.


Ultrasonography-Based Thyroidal and Perithyroidal Anatomy and Its Clinical Significance.

Ha EJ, Baek JH, Lee JH - Korean J Radiol (2015)

Relationship of recurrent laryngeal nerves to adjacent anatomic structures.A. Schematic drawing shows location of recurrent laryngeal nerve (arrows). B. Although recurrent laryngeal nerve is not directly visualized on ultrasonography, its location can be expected in tracheoesophageal groove (arrows).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499539&req=5

Figure 5: Relationship of recurrent laryngeal nerves to adjacent anatomic structures.A. Schematic drawing shows location of recurrent laryngeal nerve (arrows). B. Although recurrent laryngeal nerve is not directly visualized on ultrasonography, its location can be expected in tracheoesophageal groove (arrows).
Mentions: The RLN is a branch of the vagus nerve that supplies the intrinsic muscles of the larynx. The RLN is not directly visualized on US due to its small diameter. Therefore, knowledge of its expected course and variation is essential to prevent complications during the procedures (Fig. 5). The right and left RLNs are not symmetrical in course, with the left nerve looping under the aortic arch and the right nerve traveling directly upwards after curving below the subclavian artery. At the level of the neck, they are located in the tracheoesophageal groove, passing posteromedially to both lobes of the thyroid. They then penetrate the larynx posterior to the cricoarytenoid joints at the level of the thyroid cartilage.

Bottom Line: For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential.Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures.Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-380, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Ultrasonography (US)-guided procedures such as ethanol ablation, radiofrequency ablation, laser ablation, selective nerve block, and core needle biopsy have been widely applied in the diagnosis and management of thyroid and neck lesions. For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential. However, most previous reports evaluated neck anatomy based on cadavers, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging rather than US. Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures. Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

No MeSH data available.