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Ultrasonography-Based Thyroidal and Perithyroidal Anatomy and Its Clinical Significance.

Ha EJ, Baek JH, Lee JH - Korean J Radiol (2015)

Bottom Line: For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential.Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures.Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-380, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Ultrasonography (US)-guided procedures such as ethanol ablation, radiofrequency ablation, laser ablation, selective nerve block, and core needle biopsy have been widely applied in the diagnosis and management of thyroid and neck lesions. For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential. However, most previous reports evaluated neck anatomy based on cadavers, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging rather than US. Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures. Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic drawing of transverse section of neck at C6 level.Relationship of neck nerves to adjacent anatomic structures is shown. 1 = recurrent laryngeal nerve, 2 = vagus nerve, 3 = cervical sympathetic ganglion, 4 = cervical/brachial plexus, 5 = spinal accessory nerve, 6 = phrenic nerve
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Figure 1: Schematic drawing of transverse section of neck at C6 level.Relationship of neck nerves to adjacent anatomic structures is shown. 1 = recurrent laryngeal nerve, 2 = vagus nerve, 3 = cervical sympathetic ganglion, 4 = cervical/brachial plexus, 5 = spinal accessory nerve, 6 = phrenic nerve

Mentions: Among the anatomic structures, nerve injuries may be serious complications in practice, and are therefore discussed in detail (Fig. 1). Normal peripheral nerves can usually be demonstrated with high-resolution US; however, the US feature of the nerve may vary depending on the equipment used, location in the neck, and size of the nerve (181920). With 10-17 MHz frequency probes, the nerve is seen as a honeycomb or reticular pattern with approximately 2 to 8 hypoechoic rounded fascicles according to size surrounded by hyperechoic epineurium (18192021). On longitudinal scans, the nerve is seen as a striated pattern with several parallel echogenic lines of its internal structures (Fig. 2). Detection of small nerves may be operator-dependent, and requires a longer learning curve due to difficulties in identifying subtle anatomic details using US.


Ultrasonography-Based Thyroidal and Perithyroidal Anatomy and Its Clinical Significance.

Ha EJ, Baek JH, Lee JH - Korean J Radiol (2015)

Schematic drawing of transverse section of neck at C6 level.Relationship of neck nerves to adjacent anatomic structures is shown. 1 = recurrent laryngeal nerve, 2 = vagus nerve, 3 = cervical sympathetic ganglion, 4 = cervical/brachial plexus, 5 = spinal accessory nerve, 6 = phrenic nerve
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499539&req=5

Figure 1: Schematic drawing of transverse section of neck at C6 level.Relationship of neck nerves to adjacent anatomic structures is shown. 1 = recurrent laryngeal nerve, 2 = vagus nerve, 3 = cervical sympathetic ganglion, 4 = cervical/brachial plexus, 5 = spinal accessory nerve, 6 = phrenic nerve
Mentions: Among the anatomic structures, nerve injuries may be serious complications in practice, and are therefore discussed in detail (Fig. 1). Normal peripheral nerves can usually be demonstrated with high-resolution US; however, the US feature of the nerve may vary depending on the equipment used, location in the neck, and size of the nerve (181920). With 10-17 MHz frequency probes, the nerve is seen as a honeycomb or reticular pattern with approximately 2 to 8 hypoechoic rounded fascicles according to size surrounded by hyperechoic epineurium (18192021). On longitudinal scans, the nerve is seen as a striated pattern with several parallel echogenic lines of its internal structures (Fig. 2). Detection of small nerves may be operator-dependent, and requires a longer learning curve due to difficulties in identifying subtle anatomic details using US.

Bottom Line: For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential.Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures.Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 443-380, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Ultrasonography (US)-guided procedures such as ethanol ablation, radiofrequency ablation, laser ablation, selective nerve block, and core needle biopsy have been widely applied in the diagnosis and management of thyroid and neck lesions. For a safe and effective US-guided procedure, knowledge of neck anatomy, particularly that of the nerves, vessels, and other critical structures, is essential. However, most previous reports evaluated neck anatomy based on cadavers, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging rather than US. Therefore, the aim of this article was to elucidate US-based thyroidal and perithyroidal anatomy, as well as its clinical significance in the use of prevention techniques for complications during the US-guided procedures. Knowledge of these areas may be helpful for maximizing the efficacy and minimizing the complications of US-guided procedures for the thyroid and other neck lesions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus