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Effect of a urinary catheter on seed position and rectal and bladder doses in CT-based post-implant dosimetry for prostate cancer brachytherapy.

Kunogi H, Yamaguchi N, Wakumoto Y, Sasai K - J Contemp Brachytherapy (2015)

Bottom Line: We compared the rectal and bladder doses in 18 patients on each CT series.Radiation doses to the bladder with a catheter were significantly lower than those without a catheter (p = 0.027).Post-implant dosimetry (PID) with no catheter showed significantly lower rectal doses and higher bladder doses than those of PID with a catheter.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To assess the variability in rectal and bladder dosimetric parameters determined according to post-implant computed tomography (CT) images in patients with or without a urethral catheter.

Material and methods: Patients with prostate cancer who were scheduled to undergo CT after brachytherapy between October 2012 and January 2014 were included. We obtained CT series with and without a urinary catheter in each patient. We compared the rectal and bladder doses in 18 patients on each CT series.

Results: The shifts in the seed positions between with and without a catheter in place were 1.3 ± 0.3 mm (mean ± standard deviation). The radiation doses to the rectum, as determined on the CT series, with a urethral catheter were higher than those on CT without a catheter (p < 0.001). Radiation doses to the bladder with a catheter were significantly lower than those without a catheter (p = 0.027).

Conclusions: Post-implant dosimetry (PID) with no catheter showed significantly lower rectal doses and higher bladder doses than those of PID with a catheter. We recommend the PID procedure for CT images in patients without a catheter. Use of CT with a catheter is limited to identifying urethral position.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

RD2cc(A) and BD1cc(B) values in each patient with or without a catheter. The RD2cc value (93.4 Gy) on CT with a catheter was significantly higher than that (85.1 Gy) without a catheter (p < 0.001). The BD1cc value (75.3 Gy) on CT with a catheter was significantly lower than that (81.2 Gy) without a catheter (p = 0.027)
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Figure 0003: RD2cc(A) and BD1cc(B) values in each patient with or without a catheter. The RD2cc value (93.4 Gy) on CT with a catheter was significantly higher than that (85.1 Gy) without a catheter (p < 0.001). The BD1cc value (75.3 Gy) on CT with a catheter was significantly lower than that (81.2 Gy) without a catheter (p = 0.027)

Mentions: The RD2cc and RV100 values in all 18 patients were significantly different on the CT series with vs. without the catheter (RD2cc (mean ± SD): 93.4 ± 13.9 Gy vs. 85.1 ± 11.9 Gy, p < 0.001; RV100 (mean ± SD): 0.42 ± 0.32 cc vs. 0.21 ± 0.26 cc, p < 0.001). BD1cc values determined on the CT series were significantly lower with a catheter than those without the catheter in place (BD1cc (mean ± SD): 75.3 ± 17.1 Gy vs. 81.2 ± 23.2 Gy, p = 0.027). Figure 3 shows the RD2cc and BD1cc values of each patient.


Effect of a urinary catheter on seed position and rectal and bladder doses in CT-based post-implant dosimetry for prostate cancer brachytherapy.

Kunogi H, Yamaguchi N, Wakumoto Y, Sasai K - J Contemp Brachytherapy (2015)

RD2cc(A) and BD1cc(B) values in each patient with or without a catheter. The RD2cc value (93.4 Gy) on CT with a catheter was significantly higher than that (85.1 Gy) without a catheter (p < 0.001). The BD1cc value (75.3 Gy) on CT with a catheter was significantly lower than that (81.2 Gy) without a catheter (p = 0.027)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499521&req=5

Figure 0003: RD2cc(A) and BD1cc(B) values in each patient with or without a catheter. The RD2cc value (93.4 Gy) on CT with a catheter was significantly higher than that (85.1 Gy) without a catheter (p < 0.001). The BD1cc value (75.3 Gy) on CT with a catheter was significantly lower than that (81.2 Gy) without a catheter (p = 0.027)
Mentions: The RD2cc and RV100 values in all 18 patients were significantly different on the CT series with vs. without the catheter (RD2cc (mean ± SD): 93.4 ± 13.9 Gy vs. 85.1 ± 11.9 Gy, p < 0.001; RV100 (mean ± SD): 0.42 ± 0.32 cc vs. 0.21 ± 0.26 cc, p < 0.001). BD1cc values determined on the CT series were significantly lower with a catheter than those without the catheter in place (BD1cc (mean ± SD): 75.3 ± 17.1 Gy vs. 81.2 ± 23.2 Gy, p = 0.027). Figure 3 shows the RD2cc and BD1cc values of each patient.

Bottom Line: We compared the rectal and bladder doses in 18 patients on each CT series.Radiation doses to the bladder with a catheter were significantly lower than those without a catheter (p = 0.027).Post-implant dosimetry (PID) with no catheter showed significantly lower rectal doses and higher bladder doses than those of PID with a catheter.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiation Oncology.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To assess the variability in rectal and bladder dosimetric parameters determined according to post-implant computed tomography (CT) images in patients with or without a urethral catheter.

Material and methods: Patients with prostate cancer who were scheduled to undergo CT after brachytherapy between October 2012 and January 2014 were included. We obtained CT series with and without a urinary catheter in each patient. We compared the rectal and bladder doses in 18 patients on each CT series.

Results: The shifts in the seed positions between with and without a catheter in place were 1.3 ± 0.3 mm (mean ± standard deviation). The radiation doses to the rectum, as determined on the CT series, with a urethral catheter were higher than those on CT without a catheter (p < 0.001). Radiation doses to the bladder with a catheter were significantly lower than those without a catheter (p = 0.027).

Conclusions: Post-implant dosimetry (PID) with no catheter showed significantly lower rectal doses and higher bladder doses than those of PID with a catheter. We recommend the PID procedure for CT images in patients without a catheter. Use of CT with a catheter is limited to identifying urethral position.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus