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The ameliorative effect of silibinin against radiation-induced lung injury: protection of normal tissue without decreasing therapeutic efficacy in lung cancer.

Son Y, Lee HJ, Rho JK, Chung SY, Lee CG, Yang K, Kim SH, Lee M, Shin IS, Kim JS - BMC Pulm Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Silibinin has been known for its role in anti-cancer and radio-protective effect.Silibinin treatment mitigated the radiation-induced lung injury possibly by reducing inflammation and fibrosis, which might be related with the improved survival rate.Silibinin might be a useful agent for lung cancer patients as a non-toxic complementary approach to alleviate the side effects by thorax irradiation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (DIRAMS), Busasn, South Korea. son-young-hun@hanmail.net.

ABSTRACT

Background: Silibinin has been known for its role in anti-cancer and radio-protective effect. Radiation therapy for treating lung cancer might lead to late-phase pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effects of silibinin in radiation-induced lung injury with a mouse model.

Methods: In this study, we examined the ability of silibinin to mitigate lung injury in, and improve survival of, C57BL/6 mice given 13 Gy thoracic irradiation and silibinin treatments orally at 100 mg/kg/day for seven days after irradiation. In addition, Lewis lung cancer (LLC) cells were injected intravenously in C57BL/6 mice to generate lung tumor nodules. Lung tumor-bearing mice were treated with lung radiation therapy at 13 Gy and with silibinin at a dose of 100 mg/day for seven days after irradiation.

Results: Silibinin was shown to increase mouse survival, to ameliorate radiation-induced hemorrhage, inflammation and fibrosis in lung tissue, to reduce the number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and to reduce inflammatory cell infiltration in the respiratory tract. In LLC tumor injected mice, lung tissue from mice treated with both radiation and silibinin showed no differences compared to lung tissue from mice treated with radiation alone.

Conclusions: Silibinin treatment mitigated the radiation-induced lung injury possibly by reducing inflammation and fibrosis, which might be related with the improved survival rate. Silibinin might be a useful agent for lung cancer patients as a non-toxic complementary approach to alleviate the side effects by thorax irradiation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of radiation and silibinin on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). (A) Representative pictures of Diff-quick staining of cytospin preparation in BALF after thoracic irradiation with and without silibinin treatment. Changes in macrophage size (A) and percentage of multinucleated macrophages in BALF at 80 and 200 days after thoracic irradiation. The data are reported as means ± SEM (n = 5 per group). *p < 0.05 vs. sham-irradiated controls. #p < 0.05 vs. irradiated groups.
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Fig4: Effects of radiation and silibinin on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). (A) Representative pictures of Diff-quick staining of cytospin preparation in BALF after thoracic irradiation with and without silibinin treatment. Changes in macrophage size (A) and percentage of multinucleated macrophages in BALF at 80 and 200 days after thoracic irradiation. The data are reported as means ± SEM (n = 5 per group). *p < 0.05 vs. sham-irradiated controls. #p < 0.05 vs. irradiated groups.

Mentions: Because the main cellular component of BALF is macrophage, macrophage morphology and multinucleated macrophages were evaluated in the BALF of mice after irradiation with and without silibinin treatment. In mice treated with thorax irradiation alone, the macrophage size was increased at 80 days, and enlarged macrophages became notably evident at 200 days after irradiation (Figure 4A and B). After silibinin treatment, the size of macrophages in the BALF was significantly reduced compared to those in the radiation-only group (Figure 4B).Figure 4


The ameliorative effect of silibinin against radiation-induced lung injury: protection of normal tissue without decreasing therapeutic efficacy in lung cancer.

Son Y, Lee HJ, Rho JK, Chung SY, Lee CG, Yang K, Kim SH, Lee M, Shin IS, Kim JS - BMC Pulm Med (2015)

Effects of radiation and silibinin on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). (A) Representative pictures of Diff-quick staining of cytospin preparation in BALF after thoracic irradiation with and without silibinin treatment. Changes in macrophage size (A) and percentage of multinucleated macrophages in BALF at 80 and 200 days after thoracic irradiation. The data are reported as means ± SEM (n = 5 per group). *p < 0.05 vs. sham-irradiated controls. #p < 0.05 vs. irradiated groups.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4499198&req=5

Fig4: Effects of radiation and silibinin on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). (A) Representative pictures of Diff-quick staining of cytospin preparation in BALF after thoracic irradiation with and without silibinin treatment. Changes in macrophage size (A) and percentage of multinucleated macrophages in BALF at 80 and 200 days after thoracic irradiation. The data are reported as means ± SEM (n = 5 per group). *p < 0.05 vs. sham-irradiated controls. #p < 0.05 vs. irradiated groups.
Mentions: Because the main cellular component of BALF is macrophage, macrophage morphology and multinucleated macrophages were evaluated in the BALF of mice after irradiation with and without silibinin treatment. In mice treated with thorax irradiation alone, the macrophage size was increased at 80 days, and enlarged macrophages became notably evident at 200 days after irradiation (Figure 4A and B). After silibinin treatment, the size of macrophages in the BALF was significantly reduced compared to those in the radiation-only group (Figure 4B).Figure 4

Bottom Line: Silibinin has been known for its role in anti-cancer and radio-protective effect.Silibinin treatment mitigated the radiation-induced lung injury possibly by reducing inflammation and fibrosis, which might be related with the improved survival rate.Silibinin might be a useful agent for lung cancer patients as a non-toxic complementary approach to alleviate the side effects by thorax irradiation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dongnam Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences (DIRAMS), Busasn, South Korea. son-young-hun@hanmail.net.

ABSTRACT

Background: Silibinin has been known for its role in anti-cancer and radio-protective effect. Radiation therapy for treating lung cancer might lead to late-phase pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effects of silibinin in radiation-induced lung injury with a mouse model.

Methods: In this study, we examined the ability of silibinin to mitigate lung injury in, and improve survival of, C57BL/6 mice given 13 Gy thoracic irradiation and silibinin treatments orally at 100 mg/kg/day for seven days after irradiation. In addition, Lewis lung cancer (LLC) cells were injected intravenously in C57BL/6 mice to generate lung tumor nodules. Lung tumor-bearing mice were treated with lung radiation therapy at 13 Gy and with silibinin at a dose of 100 mg/day for seven days after irradiation.

Results: Silibinin was shown to increase mouse survival, to ameliorate radiation-induced hemorrhage, inflammation and fibrosis in lung tissue, to reduce the number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and to reduce inflammatory cell infiltration in the respiratory tract. In LLC tumor injected mice, lung tissue from mice treated with both radiation and silibinin showed no differences compared to lung tissue from mice treated with radiation alone.

Conclusions: Silibinin treatment mitigated the radiation-induced lung injury possibly by reducing inflammation and fibrosis, which might be related with the improved survival rate. Silibinin might be a useful agent for lung cancer patients as a non-toxic complementary approach to alleviate the side effects by thorax irradiation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus