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Effect of Probiotics on Glycemic Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials.

Ruan Y, Sun J, He J, Chen F, Chen R, Chen H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Data were pooled using a random-effects model and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI.Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2).Modification of gut microbiota by probiotic supplementation may be a method for preventing and control hyperglycemia in clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous clinical trials indicate that probiotic consumption may improve blood glucose control, however, results from randomized trials on glycemic control have been inconsistent.

Objective: To investigate the effects of probiotics on glycemic control in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Data sources: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Clinicaltrial.gov through October 2014.

Data extraction and synthesis: Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2).

Results: Seventeen randomized controlled trials were included, in which 17 fasting blood glucose (n = 1105), 11 fasting plasma insulin (n = 788), 8 homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (n = 635) comparisons were reported. Probiotic consumption, compared with placebo, significantly reduced fasting glucose (MD = -0.31 mmol/L; 95% CI 0.56, 0.06; p = 0.02), fasting plasma insulin (MD = -1.29 μU/mL; 95% CI -2.17, -0.41; p = 0.004), and HOMA-IR (MD = 0.48; 95% CI -0.83, -0.13; p = 0.007).

Conclusions: Probiotic consumption may improve glycemic control modestly. Modification of gut microbiota by probiotic supplementation may be a method for preventing and control hyperglycemia in clinical practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Forest plot of randomized controlled trials comparing the effect of probiotics on HOMA-IR with placebo/comparator.Weighted mean differences (95% CIs) for HOMA-IR are shown. Pooled estimates (diamonds) calculated by the random effects method. IV, inverse variance.
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pone.0132121.g005: Forest plot of randomized controlled trials comparing the effect of probiotics on HOMA-IR with placebo/comparator.Weighted mean differences (95% CIs) for HOMA-IR are shown. Pooled estimates (diamonds) calculated by the random effects method. IV, inverse variance.

Mentions: Fig 5 shows a forest plot of the pooled effect of probiotics on HOAM-IR. Eight of 17 studies reported changes in HOMA-IR, with 4 studies reporting a significant reduction of HOMA-IR after consuming probiotics[16, 23, 24, 28]. The mean difference ranged from -0.41 to -1.60. The pooled mean difference was -0.48 (95% CI -0.83, -0.13; p = 0.007) for HOMA-IR. Significant evidence of inter-study heterogeneity was observed across studies (I2 = 93%, p < 0.01).


Effect of Probiotics on Glycemic Control: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized, Controlled Trials.

Ruan Y, Sun J, He J, Chen F, Chen R, Chen H - PLoS ONE (2015)

Forest plot of randomized controlled trials comparing the effect of probiotics on HOMA-IR with placebo/comparator.Weighted mean differences (95% CIs) for HOMA-IR are shown. Pooled estimates (diamonds) calculated by the random effects method. IV, inverse variance.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4498615&req=5

pone.0132121.g005: Forest plot of randomized controlled trials comparing the effect of probiotics on HOMA-IR with placebo/comparator.Weighted mean differences (95% CIs) for HOMA-IR are shown. Pooled estimates (diamonds) calculated by the random effects method. IV, inverse variance.
Mentions: Fig 5 shows a forest plot of the pooled effect of probiotics on HOAM-IR. Eight of 17 studies reported changes in HOMA-IR, with 4 studies reporting a significant reduction of HOMA-IR after consuming probiotics[16, 23, 24, 28]. The mean difference ranged from -0.41 to -1.60. The pooled mean difference was -0.48 (95% CI -0.83, -0.13; p = 0.007) for HOMA-IR. Significant evidence of inter-study heterogeneity was observed across studies (I2 = 93%, p < 0.01).

Bottom Line: Data were pooled using a random-effects model and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI.Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2).Modification of gut microbiota by probiotic supplementation may be a method for preventing and control hyperglycemia in clinical practice.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Endocrinology, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous clinical trials indicate that probiotic consumption may improve blood glucose control, however, results from randomized trials on glycemic control have been inconsistent.

Objective: To investigate the effects of probiotics on glycemic control in a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Data sources: PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library, and Clinicaltrial.gov through October 2014.

Data extraction and synthesis: Two independent reviewers extracted relevant data and assessed study quality and risk of bias. Data were pooled using a random-effects model and expressed as mean differences (MD) with 95% CI. Heterogeneity was assessed (Cochran Q-statistic) and quantified (I2).

Results: Seventeen randomized controlled trials were included, in which 17 fasting blood glucose (n = 1105), 11 fasting plasma insulin (n = 788), 8 homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (n = 635) comparisons were reported. Probiotic consumption, compared with placebo, significantly reduced fasting glucose (MD = -0.31 mmol/L; 95% CI 0.56, 0.06; p = 0.02), fasting plasma insulin (MD = -1.29 μU/mL; 95% CI -2.17, -0.41; p = 0.004), and HOMA-IR (MD = 0.48; 95% CI -0.83, -0.13; p = 0.007).

Conclusions: Probiotic consumption may improve glycemic control modestly. Modification of gut microbiota by probiotic supplementation may be a method for preventing and control hyperglycemia in clinical practice.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus