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Neonatal handling decreases unconditioned anxiety, conditioned fear, and improves two-way avoidance acquisition: a study with the inbred Roman high (RHA-I)- and low-avoidance (RLA-I) rats of both sexes.

Río-Ȧlamos C, Oliveras I, Cañete T, Blázquez G, Martínez-Membrives E, Tobeña A, Fernández-Teruel A - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Bottom Line: NH increased exploration of the novel object in the NOE test as well as exploration of the open sections of the ZM test in both rat strains and sexes, although the effects were relatively more marked in the (high anxious) RLA-I strain and in females.NH did not affect BAS, but reduced CCF in both strains and sexes, and improved shuttle box avoidance acquisition especially in RLA-I (and particularly in females) and in female RHA-I rats.These are completely novel findings, which indicate that even some genetically-based anxiety/fear-related phenotypes can be significantly modulated by previous environmental experiences such as the NH manipulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, Institute of Neurosciences, Autonomous University of Barcelona Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The present study evaluated the long-lasting effects of neonatal handling (NH; administered during the first 21 days of life) on unlearned and learned anxiety-related responses in inbred Roman High- (RHA-I) and Low-avoidance (RLA-I) rats. To this aim, untreated and neonatally-handled RHA-I and RLA-I rats of both sexes were tested in the following tests/tasks: a novel object exploration (NOE) test, the elevated zero maze (ZM) test, a "baseline acoustic startle" (BAS) test, a "context-conditioned fear" (CCF) test and the acquisition of two-way active-shuttle box-avoidance (SHAV). RLA-I rats showed higher unconditioned (novel object exploration test -"NOE"-, elevated zero maze test -"ZM"-, BAS), and conditioned (CCF, SHAV) anxiety. NH increased exploration of the novel object in the NOE test as well as exploration of the open sections of the ZM test in both rat strains and sexes, although the effects were relatively more marked in the (high anxious) RLA-I strain and in females. NH did not affect BAS, but reduced CCF in both strains and sexes, and improved shuttle box avoidance acquisition especially in RLA-I (and particularly in females) and in female RHA-I rats. These are completely novel findings, which indicate that even some genetically-based anxiety/fear-related phenotypes can be significantly modulated by previous environmental experiences such as the NH manipulation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean ± S.E.M of (A) “Latency –time elapsed—until the first exploration of the novel object” and (B) “Total time spent exploring the novel object” in Experiment 1 (NOE test). &, indicates the “Strain” effect, p < 0.05. Group symbols: C, control non-handled group; H, neonatally handled (NH) group.
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Figure 2: Mean ± S.E.M of (A) “Latency –time elapsed—until the first exploration of the novel object” and (B) “Total time spent exploring the novel object” in Experiment 1 (NOE test). &, indicates the “Strain” effect, p < 0.05. Group symbols: C, control non-handled group; H, neonatally handled (NH) group.

Mentions: The results of the NOE test (Figures 2A,B) showed that, compared to RHA-I rats, RLA-I animals presented higher latency (to explore for the first time the novel object; LAT-NOE) and less time spent exploring the novel object (TIME-NOE) [“Strain” effect on both parameters, F(1, 78) = 17.36, p < 0.001, and F(1,78) = 118.30, P < 0.001, respectively]. As expected, NH significantly reduced LAT-NOE and increased TIME-NOE in both rat strains [“NH” effect, F(1,78) = 9.66, p ≤ 0.003, and F(1,78) = 80.40 P < 0.001, respectively]. A “sex” effect was found only on TIME-NOE [F(1, 78) = 13.08, p = 0.001], indicating that females (particularly RHA-Is) spent overall less time exploring the novel object compared to males (Figure 2B). There were also “Strain × NH” interactions for LAT-NOE and TIME-NOE [F(1, 78) = 6.37, p ≤ 0.01, and F(1,78) = 5.32 P = 0.02, respectively], as NH effects were globally stronger in RLA-I rats of both sexes.


Neonatal handling decreases unconditioned anxiety, conditioned fear, and improves two-way avoidance acquisition: a study with the inbred Roman high (RHA-I)- and low-avoidance (RLA-I) rats of both sexes.

Río-Ȧlamos C, Oliveras I, Cañete T, Blázquez G, Martínez-Membrives E, Tobeña A, Fernández-Teruel A - Front Behav Neurosci (2015)

Mean ± S.E.M of (A) “Latency –time elapsed—until the first exploration of the novel object” and (B) “Total time spent exploring the novel object” in Experiment 1 (NOE test). &, indicates the “Strain” effect, p < 0.05. Group symbols: C, control non-handled group; H, neonatally handled (NH) group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4498386&req=5

Figure 2: Mean ± S.E.M of (A) “Latency –time elapsed—until the first exploration of the novel object” and (B) “Total time spent exploring the novel object” in Experiment 1 (NOE test). &, indicates the “Strain” effect, p < 0.05. Group symbols: C, control non-handled group; H, neonatally handled (NH) group.
Mentions: The results of the NOE test (Figures 2A,B) showed that, compared to RHA-I rats, RLA-I animals presented higher latency (to explore for the first time the novel object; LAT-NOE) and less time spent exploring the novel object (TIME-NOE) [“Strain” effect on both parameters, F(1, 78) = 17.36, p < 0.001, and F(1,78) = 118.30, P < 0.001, respectively]. As expected, NH significantly reduced LAT-NOE and increased TIME-NOE in both rat strains [“NH” effect, F(1,78) = 9.66, p ≤ 0.003, and F(1,78) = 80.40 P < 0.001, respectively]. A “sex” effect was found only on TIME-NOE [F(1, 78) = 13.08, p = 0.001], indicating that females (particularly RHA-Is) spent overall less time exploring the novel object compared to males (Figure 2B). There were also “Strain × NH” interactions for LAT-NOE and TIME-NOE [F(1, 78) = 6.37, p ≤ 0.01, and F(1,78) = 5.32 P = 0.02, respectively], as NH effects were globally stronger in RLA-I rats of both sexes.

Bottom Line: NH increased exploration of the novel object in the NOE test as well as exploration of the open sections of the ZM test in both rat strains and sexes, although the effects were relatively more marked in the (high anxious) RLA-I strain and in females.NH did not affect BAS, but reduced CCF in both strains and sexes, and improved shuttle box avoidance acquisition especially in RLA-I (and particularly in females) and in female RHA-I rats.These are completely novel findings, which indicate that even some genetically-based anxiety/fear-related phenotypes can be significantly modulated by previous environmental experiences such as the NH manipulation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Psychology Unit, Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine, School of Medicine, Institute of Neurosciences, Autonomous University of Barcelona Barcelona, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The present study evaluated the long-lasting effects of neonatal handling (NH; administered during the first 21 days of life) on unlearned and learned anxiety-related responses in inbred Roman High- (RHA-I) and Low-avoidance (RLA-I) rats. To this aim, untreated and neonatally-handled RHA-I and RLA-I rats of both sexes were tested in the following tests/tasks: a novel object exploration (NOE) test, the elevated zero maze (ZM) test, a "baseline acoustic startle" (BAS) test, a "context-conditioned fear" (CCF) test and the acquisition of two-way active-shuttle box-avoidance (SHAV). RLA-I rats showed higher unconditioned (novel object exploration test -"NOE"-, elevated zero maze test -"ZM"-, BAS), and conditioned (CCF, SHAV) anxiety. NH increased exploration of the novel object in the NOE test as well as exploration of the open sections of the ZM test in both rat strains and sexes, although the effects were relatively more marked in the (high anxious) RLA-I strain and in females. NH did not affect BAS, but reduced CCF in both strains and sexes, and improved shuttle box avoidance acquisition especially in RLA-I (and particularly in females) and in female RHA-I rats. These are completely novel findings, which indicate that even some genetically-based anxiety/fear-related phenotypes can be significantly modulated by previous environmental experiences such as the NH manipulation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus