Limits...
Differential protein folding and chemical changes in lung tissues exposed to asbestos or particulates.

Pascolo L, Borelli V, Canzonieri V, Gianoncelli A, Birarda G, Bedolla DE, Salomé M, Vaccari L, Calligaro C, Cotte M, Hesse B, Luisi F, Zabucchi G, Melato M, Rizzardi C - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: Both asbestos and particulates alter lung iron homeostasis, with a more marked effect in asbestos exposure. μFTIR analyses revealed abundant proteins on asbestos bodies but not on anthracotic particles.Most importantly, the analyses demonstrated that the asbestos coating proteins contain high levels of β-sheet structures.The occurrence of conformational changes in the proteic component of the asbestos coating provides new insights into long-term asbestos effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Maternal and Child Health, IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Trieste, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Environmental and occupational inhalants may induce a large number of pulmonary diseases, with asbestos exposure being the most risky. The mechanisms are clearly related to chemical composition and physical and surface properties of materials. A combination of X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (μFTIR) microscopy was used to chemically characterize and compare asbestos bodies versus environmental particulates (anthracosis) in lung tissues from asbestos exposed and control patients. μXRF analyses revealed heterogeneously aggregated particles in the anthracotic structures, containing mainly Si, K, Al and Fe. Both asbestos and particulates alter lung iron homeostasis, with a more marked effect in asbestos exposure. μFTIR analyses revealed abundant proteins on asbestos bodies but not on anthracotic particles. Most importantly, the analyses demonstrated that the asbestos coating proteins contain high levels of β-sheet structures. The occurrence of conformational changes in the proteic component of the asbestos coating provides new insights into long-term asbestos effects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

μFTIR Imaging of lung tissues with anthracosis and asbestosis.Upper row: (A) Optical image of the lung tissue sample deposited on ultralene film, with evidence of anthracosis; B) Chemical image of the 1720–1490 cm−1 spectral region (Amide I and II) corresponding to A. Middle row: (C) Optical picture of the lung tissue sample deposited on a BaF2 window, showing asbestos bodies; (D) Chemical image of the 1720–1490 cm−1 spectral region (Amide I and II) corresponding to C, Lower row: (E) Second derivative of the average vibrational spectrum of selected points on the asbestos bodies and surrounding tissues (line thickness is proportional to standard deviation).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4498377&req=5

f4: μFTIR Imaging of lung tissues with anthracosis and asbestosis.Upper row: (A) Optical image of the lung tissue sample deposited on ultralene film, with evidence of anthracosis; B) Chemical image of the 1720–1490 cm−1 spectral region (Amide I and II) corresponding to A. Middle row: (C) Optical picture of the lung tissue sample deposited on a BaF2 window, showing asbestos bodies; (D) Chemical image of the 1720–1490 cm−1 spectral region (Amide I and II) corresponding to C, Lower row: (E) Second derivative of the average vibrational spectrum of selected points on the asbestos bodies and surrounding tissues (line thickness is proportional to standard deviation).

Mentions: In Fig. 4, we report an example of chemical images showing the total protein content in tissues with anthracosis (panel B) and asbestosis (panel D), generated by integrating the infrared region corresponding to protein Amide I and Amide II bands (1720–1490 cm−1). The protein content appears to be a significant parameter for discriminating between ferruginous bodies and carbonaceous materials, being lower and higher with respect to the surrounding tissue for anthracosis and asbestosis respectively.


Differential protein folding and chemical changes in lung tissues exposed to asbestos or particulates.

Pascolo L, Borelli V, Canzonieri V, Gianoncelli A, Birarda G, Bedolla DE, Salomé M, Vaccari L, Calligaro C, Cotte M, Hesse B, Luisi F, Zabucchi G, Melato M, Rizzardi C - Sci Rep (2015)

μFTIR Imaging of lung tissues with anthracosis and asbestosis.Upper row: (A) Optical image of the lung tissue sample deposited on ultralene film, with evidence of anthracosis; B) Chemical image of the 1720–1490 cm−1 spectral region (Amide I and II) corresponding to A. Middle row: (C) Optical picture of the lung tissue sample deposited on a BaF2 window, showing asbestos bodies; (D) Chemical image of the 1720–1490 cm−1 spectral region (Amide I and II) corresponding to C, Lower row: (E) Second derivative of the average vibrational spectrum of selected points on the asbestos bodies and surrounding tissues (line thickness is proportional to standard deviation).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4498377&req=5

f4: μFTIR Imaging of lung tissues with anthracosis and asbestosis.Upper row: (A) Optical image of the lung tissue sample deposited on ultralene film, with evidence of anthracosis; B) Chemical image of the 1720–1490 cm−1 spectral region (Amide I and II) corresponding to A. Middle row: (C) Optical picture of the lung tissue sample deposited on a BaF2 window, showing asbestos bodies; (D) Chemical image of the 1720–1490 cm−1 spectral region (Amide I and II) corresponding to C, Lower row: (E) Second derivative of the average vibrational spectrum of selected points on the asbestos bodies and surrounding tissues (line thickness is proportional to standard deviation).
Mentions: In Fig. 4, we report an example of chemical images showing the total protein content in tissues with anthracosis (panel B) and asbestosis (panel D), generated by integrating the infrared region corresponding to protein Amide I and Amide II bands (1720–1490 cm−1). The protein content appears to be a significant parameter for discriminating between ferruginous bodies and carbonaceous materials, being lower and higher with respect to the surrounding tissue for anthracosis and asbestosis respectively.

Bottom Line: Both asbestos and particulates alter lung iron homeostasis, with a more marked effect in asbestos exposure. μFTIR analyses revealed abundant proteins on asbestos bodies but not on anthracotic particles.Most importantly, the analyses demonstrated that the asbestos coating proteins contain high levels of β-sheet structures.The occurrence of conformational changes in the proteic component of the asbestos coating provides new insights into long-term asbestos effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Maternal and Child Health, IRCCS Burlo Garofolo, Trieste, Italy.

ABSTRACT
Environmental and occupational inhalants may induce a large number of pulmonary diseases, with asbestos exposure being the most risky. The mechanisms are clearly related to chemical composition and physical and surface properties of materials. A combination of X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (μFTIR) microscopy was used to chemically characterize and compare asbestos bodies versus environmental particulates (anthracosis) in lung tissues from asbestos exposed and control patients. μXRF analyses revealed heterogeneously aggregated particles in the anthracotic structures, containing mainly Si, K, Al and Fe. Both asbestos and particulates alter lung iron homeostasis, with a more marked effect in asbestos exposure. μFTIR analyses revealed abundant proteins on asbestos bodies but not on anthracotic particles. Most importantly, the analyses demonstrated that the asbestos coating proteins contain high levels of β-sheet structures. The occurrence of conformational changes in the proteic component of the asbestos coating provides new insights into long-term asbestos effects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus