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Astragalus polysaccharide promotes the release of mature granulocytes through the L-selectin signaling pathway.

Zhang PP, Meng ZT, Wang LC, Guo LM, Li K - Chin Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Both APS and G-CSF restored the expression of L-selectin, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), CD11b/CD18, and ADAM17 to normal levels (P > 0.05 vs. control group on each time point), with APS eliciting a greater effect than G-CSF (P = 0.005 on day 7, P < 0.001 on day 10 and 14 for L-selectin; P = 0.038 on day 7, P = 0.001 on day 10, P < 0.001 on day 14 for PSGL-1; P < 0.001 on day 7, 10 and 14 for ADAM17; P < 0.001 on day 7, 10, and 14 for CD11b/CD18).The ability of APS to increase numbers of PMNLs in peripheral blood after chemotherapy was significantly superior to that of G-CSF 7 days after chemotherapy (P = 0.029 on day 10, P = 0.006 on day 14).Moreover, APS more significantly improved the chemotactic ability of PMNLs among mature BM granulocytes and peripheral blood neutrophils after chemotherapy than did G-CSF (P < 0.001 on day 7, P = 0.001 on day 10 and P = 0.005 on day 14).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, Lung Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer; Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin, 300060 China ; Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, 430079 China.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aims to investigate the leukogenic effect of astragalus polysaccharide (APS), to compare its effect of increasing the numbers of mature granulocytes with that of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and to investigate the mechanism.

Methods: Rats were arbitrarily grouped into four groups (control, cyclophosphamide (CTX), CTX + APS, and CTX + G-CSF groups), and each group was then arbitrarily divided into five subgroups according to the time period since CTX infusion (0, 4, 7, 10, and 14 days). The expression of leukocyte selectin (L-selectin), its ligand, and shedding-related protease on granulocytes was analyzed. Leukocyte counts were obtained. Chemotactic capacity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) was assessed.

Results: Both APS and G-CSF restored the expression of L-selectin, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), CD11b/CD18, and ADAM17 to normal levels (P > 0.05 vs. control group on each time point), with APS eliciting a greater effect than G-CSF (P = 0.005 on day 7, P < 0.001 on day 10 and 14 for L-selectin; P = 0.038 on day 7, P = 0.001 on day 10, P < 0.001 on day 14 for PSGL-1; P < 0.001 on day 7, 10 and 14 for ADAM17; P < 0.001 on day 7, 10, and 14 for CD11b/CD18). The percentages of the bands and segmented bone marrow (BM) cells in myeloid neutrophils were higher in the CTX + APS group than in the CTX group on day 7 (P = 0.030) and reached normal levels on day 10 (P = 0.547) and 14 (P = 0.431) vs. control group. The ability of APS to increase numbers of PMNLs in peripheral blood after chemotherapy was significantly superior to that of G-CSF 7 days after chemotherapy (P = 0.029 on day 10, P = 0.006 on day 14). Moreover, APS more significantly improved the chemotactic ability of PMNLs among mature BM granulocytes and peripheral blood neutrophils after chemotherapy than did G-CSF (P < 0.001 on day 7, P = 0.001 on day 10 and P = 0.005 on day 14).

Conclusions: APS promoted the differentiation and chemotactic ability of BM granulocytes via the L-selectin signaling pathway.

No MeSH data available.


Differentiation of BM granulocytes. BM smears collected from the sternum at different time points were used. We determined the proportion of BM bands and segmented cells in the total number of neutrophils, and used a microscope to identify the degree of differentiation of BM neutrophils. a BM smears observed under oil microscopy (600×) showed granulocyte differentiation on day 14. b Leukocyte differential counts were carried out on a minimum of 500 cells on BM smears stained with Giemsa. Cells of the granulocytic lineage were classified as immature granulocytes (myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, and metamyelocytes), mature granulocytes (bands and segmented), eosinophils, and mononuclear cells. Data were expressed as means ± SD. Comparison of CTX + APS group and CTX + G-CSF group showed a significant difference (**:P < 0.01, *: P < 0.05). Comparison of CTX + APS group and CTX group showed a significant difference (^ ^: P < 0.01, ^:P < 0.05)
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Fig4: Differentiation of BM granulocytes. BM smears collected from the sternum at different time points were used. We determined the proportion of BM bands and segmented cells in the total number of neutrophils, and used a microscope to identify the degree of differentiation of BM neutrophils. a BM smears observed under oil microscopy (600×) showed granulocyte differentiation on day 14. b Leukocyte differential counts were carried out on a minimum of 500 cells on BM smears stained with Giemsa. Cells of the granulocytic lineage were classified as immature granulocytes (myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, and metamyelocytes), mature granulocytes (bands and segmented), eosinophils, and mononuclear cells. Data were expressed as means ± SD. Comparison of CTX + APS group and CTX + G-CSF group showed a significant difference (**:P < 0.01, *: P < 0.05). Comparison of CTX + APS group and CTX group showed a significant difference (^ ^: P < 0.01, ^:P < 0.05)

Mentions: Using the BM smears collected from the sternum, we counted the proportion of bands and segmented cells in the total number of neutrophils under a microscope to identify the degree of BM neutrophil differentiation. The lowest percentage of BM bands and segmented cells in the CTX group was observed on days 4 and 7 (24.70 ± 5.77 % and 19.45 ± 7.23 %, respectively), but this proportion subsequently increased on days 10 and 14 (P = 0.032 on day 10, P = 0.127 on day 14vs. control group). After day 4, the percentages in the APS and G-CSF groups gradually increased as well, while on day 7, the percentage of BM bands and segmented cells was higher than that in the CTX group (P = 0.030 vs. APS group, P = 0.016 vs. G-CSF group), although this result was not statistically different from the CTX group results on days 10 and 14. The percentage in the APS group significantly increased and reached normal levels on days 10 and 14 (P = 0.547 on day 10 and P = 0.431 on day 14vs. control group; P = 0.015 on day 10 and P = 0.007 on day 14vs. G-CSF group; Fig. 4).Fig. 4


Astragalus polysaccharide promotes the release of mature granulocytes through the L-selectin signaling pathway.

Zhang PP, Meng ZT, Wang LC, Guo LM, Li K - Chin Med (2015)

Differentiation of BM granulocytes. BM smears collected from the sternum at different time points were used. We determined the proportion of BM bands and segmented cells in the total number of neutrophils, and used a microscope to identify the degree of differentiation of BM neutrophils. a BM smears observed under oil microscopy (600×) showed granulocyte differentiation on day 14. b Leukocyte differential counts were carried out on a minimum of 500 cells on BM smears stained with Giemsa. Cells of the granulocytic lineage were classified as immature granulocytes (myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, and metamyelocytes), mature granulocytes (bands and segmented), eosinophils, and mononuclear cells. Data were expressed as means ± SD. Comparison of CTX + APS group and CTX + G-CSF group showed a significant difference (**:P < 0.01, *: P < 0.05). Comparison of CTX + APS group and CTX group showed a significant difference (^ ^: P < 0.01, ^:P < 0.05)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4497426&req=5

Fig4: Differentiation of BM granulocytes. BM smears collected from the sternum at different time points were used. We determined the proportion of BM bands and segmented cells in the total number of neutrophils, and used a microscope to identify the degree of differentiation of BM neutrophils. a BM smears observed under oil microscopy (600×) showed granulocyte differentiation on day 14. b Leukocyte differential counts were carried out on a minimum of 500 cells on BM smears stained with Giemsa. Cells of the granulocytic lineage were classified as immature granulocytes (myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, and metamyelocytes), mature granulocytes (bands and segmented), eosinophils, and mononuclear cells. Data were expressed as means ± SD. Comparison of CTX + APS group and CTX + G-CSF group showed a significant difference (**:P < 0.01, *: P < 0.05). Comparison of CTX + APS group and CTX group showed a significant difference (^ ^: P < 0.01, ^:P < 0.05)
Mentions: Using the BM smears collected from the sternum, we counted the proportion of bands and segmented cells in the total number of neutrophils under a microscope to identify the degree of BM neutrophil differentiation. The lowest percentage of BM bands and segmented cells in the CTX group was observed on days 4 and 7 (24.70 ± 5.77 % and 19.45 ± 7.23 %, respectively), but this proportion subsequently increased on days 10 and 14 (P = 0.032 on day 10, P = 0.127 on day 14vs. control group). After day 4, the percentages in the APS and G-CSF groups gradually increased as well, while on day 7, the percentage of BM bands and segmented cells was higher than that in the CTX group (P = 0.030 vs. APS group, P = 0.016 vs. G-CSF group), although this result was not statistically different from the CTX group results on days 10 and 14. The percentage in the APS group significantly increased and reached normal levels on days 10 and 14 (P = 0.547 on day 10 and P = 0.431 on day 14vs. control group; P = 0.015 on day 10 and P = 0.007 on day 14vs. G-CSF group; Fig. 4).Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Both APS and G-CSF restored the expression of L-selectin, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), CD11b/CD18, and ADAM17 to normal levels (P > 0.05 vs. control group on each time point), with APS eliciting a greater effect than G-CSF (P = 0.005 on day 7, P < 0.001 on day 10 and 14 for L-selectin; P = 0.038 on day 7, P = 0.001 on day 10, P < 0.001 on day 14 for PSGL-1; P < 0.001 on day 7, 10 and 14 for ADAM17; P < 0.001 on day 7, 10, and 14 for CD11b/CD18).The ability of APS to increase numbers of PMNLs in peripheral blood after chemotherapy was significantly superior to that of G-CSF 7 days after chemotherapy (P = 0.029 on day 10, P = 0.006 on day 14).Moreover, APS more significantly improved the chemotactic ability of PMNLs among mature BM granulocytes and peripheral blood neutrophils after chemotherapy than did G-CSF (P < 0.001 on day 7, P = 0.001 on day 10 and P = 0.005 on day 14).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Thoracic Medical Oncology, Lung Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Center, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer; Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin, 300060 China ; Department of Radiotherapy, Hubei Cancer Hospital, Wuhan, 430079 China.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aims to investigate the leukogenic effect of astragalus polysaccharide (APS), to compare its effect of increasing the numbers of mature granulocytes with that of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), and to investigate the mechanism.

Methods: Rats were arbitrarily grouped into four groups (control, cyclophosphamide (CTX), CTX + APS, and CTX + G-CSF groups), and each group was then arbitrarily divided into five subgroups according to the time period since CTX infusion (0, 4, 7, 10, and 14 days). The expression of leukocyte selectin (L-selectin), its ligand, and shedding-related protease on granulocytes was analyzed. Leukocyte counts were obtained. Chemotactic capacity of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNLs) was assessed.

Results: Both APS and G-CSF restored the expression of L-selectin, P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), CD11b/CD18, and ADAM17 to normal levels (P > 0.05 vs. control group on each time point), with APS eliciting a greater effect than G-CSF (P = 0.005 on day 7, P < 0.001 on day 10 and 14 for L-selectin; P = 0.038 on day 7, P = 0.001 on day 10, P < 0.001 on day 14 for PSGL-1; P < 0.001 on day 7, 10 and 14 for ADAM17; P < 0.001 on day 7, 10, and 14 for CD11b/CD18). The percentages of the bands and segmented bone marrow (BM) cells in myeloid neutrophils were higher in the CTX + APS group than in the CTX group on day 7 (P = 0.030) and reached normal levels on day 10 (P = 0.547) and 14 (P = 0.431) vs. control group. The ability of APS to increase numbers of PMNLs in peripheral blood after chemotherapy was significantly superior to that of G-CSF 7 days after chemotherapy (P = 0.029 on day 10, P = 0.006 on day 14). Moreover, APS more significantly improved the chemotactic ability of PMNLs among mature BM granulocytes and peripheral blood neutrophils after chemotherapy than did G-CSF (P < 0.001 on day 7, P = 0.001 on day 10 and P = 0.005 on day 14).

Conclusions: APS promoted the differentiation and chemotactic ability of BM granulocytes via the L-selectin signaling pathway.

No MeSH data available.