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Adolescent school absenteeism and service use in a population-based study.

Askeland KG, Haugland S, Stormark KM, Bøe T, Hysing M - BMC Public Health (2015)

Bottom Line: The study employs data from a population-based study from 2012 targeting all pupils in upper secondary education in Hordaland County, Norway (the youth@hordaland-survey).A total of 8988 adolescents between the ages of 16 and 18 were included in the present study.This finding suggests a potential to address school absenteeism through systematic collaboration between schools and health personnel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Mental Health, Department of Public Mental Health, Bergen, Norway. kristin.gaertner@fhi.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: School absenteeism is linked to a range of health concerns, health risk behaviors and school dropout. It is therefore important to evaluate the extent to which adolescents with absenteeism are in contact with health care and other services. The aim of the current study was to investigate service use of Norwegian adolescents with moderate and high absenteeism in comparison to students with lower rates of absence.

Methods: The study employs data from a population-based study from 2012 targeting all pupils in upper secondary education in Hordaland County, Norway (the youth@hordaland-survey). A total of 8988 adolescents between the ages of 16 and 18 were included in the present study. Information on service use was based on adolescent self-report data collected in the youth@hordaland-survey. Absence data was collected using administrative data provided by the Hordaland County Council.

Results: High absence (defined as being absent 15% or more the past semester) was found among 10.1% of the adolescents. Compared to their peers with low absence (less than 3% absence the past semester), adolescents with high absence were more likely to be in contact with all the services studied, including mental health services (odds ratio (OR) 3.96), adolescent health clinics (OR 2.11) and their general practitioner (GP) (OR 1.94). Frequency of contact was higher among adolescents with moderate and high absence and there seems to be a gradient of service use corresponding to the level of absence. Still, 40% of the adolescents with high absence had not been in contact with any services.

Conclusions: Adolescents with high absence had increased use of services, although a group of youth at risk seems to be without such contact. This finding suggests a potential to address school absenteeism through systematic collaboration between schools and health personnel.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Odds ratios for contact with increasing number of services. Odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals for adolescents with moderate and high compared to low absence. The number of participants in each group is presented in the bars
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Fig1: Odds ratios for contact with increasing number of services. Odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals for adolescents with moderate and high compared to low absence. The number of participants in each group is presented in the bars

Mentions: Among the adolescents with low absence, 40.6 % had been in contact with one or more services the past semester, compared to 53.8 % with moderate absence and 60.0 % with high absence (χ2(2, 8988) = 211.84, p < .000). There were statistically significant differences between adolescents with low absence compared to moderate and high absence with regards to the number of services they had been in contact with. Adolescents with moderate absence had an OR of 1.59 (95 % CI 1.35–1.86, seen in Fig. 1) for contact with two services, while the corresponding OR for adolescents with high absence was 2.67 (2.09–3.40). For contact with four or more services, the ORs were 3.13 (95 % CI 1.96–5.00) and 8.03 (4.58–14.06) for moderate and high absence respectively.Fig. 1


Adolescent school absenteeism and service use in a population-based study.

Askeland KG, Haugland S, Stormark KM, Bøe T, Hysing M - BMC Public Health (2015)

Odds ratios for contact with increasing number of services. Odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals for adolescents with moderate and high compared to low absence. The number of participants in each group is presented in the bars
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4497412&req=5

Fig1: Odds ratios for contact with increasing number of services. Odds ratios and 95 % confidence intervals for adolescents with moderate and high compared to low absence. The number of participants in each group is presented in the bars
Mentions: Among the adolescents with low absence, 40.6 % had been in contact with one or more services the past semester, compared to 53.8 % with moderate absence and 60.0 % with high absence (χ2(2, 8988) = 211.84, p < .000). There were statistically significant differences between adolescents with low absence compared to moderate and high absence with regards to the number of services they had been in contact with. Adolescents with moderate absence had an OR of 1.59 (95 % CI 1.35–1.86, seen in Fig. 1) for contact with two services, while the corresponding OR for adolescents with high absence was 2.67 (2.09–3.40). For contact with four or more services, the ORs were 3.13 (95 % CI 1.96–5.00) and 8.03 (4.58–14.06) for moderate and high absence respectively.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The study employs data from a population-based study from 2012 targeting all pupils in upper secondary education in Hordaland County, Norway (the youth@hordaland-survey).A total of 8988 adolescents between the ages of 16 and 18 were included in the present study.This finding suggests a potential to address school absenteeism through systematic collaboration between schools and health personnel.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Mental Health, Department of Public Mental Health, Bergen, Norway. kristin.gaertner@fhi.no.

ABSTRACT

Background: School absenteeism is linked to a range of health concerns, health risk behaviors and school dropout. It is therefore important to evaluate the extent to which adolescents with absenteeism are in contact with health care and other services. The aim of the current study was to investigate service use of Norwegian adolescents with moderate and high absenteeism in comparison to students with lower rates of absence.

Methods: The study employs data from a population-based study from 2012 targeting all pupils in upper secondary education in Hordaland County, Norway (the youth@hordaland-survey). A total of 8988 adolescents between the ages of 16 and 18 were included in the present study. Information on service use was based on adolescent self-report data collected in the youth@hordaland-survey. Absence data was collected using administrative data provided by the Hordaland County Council.

Results: High absence (defined as being absent 15% or more the past semester) was found among 10.1% of the adolescents. Compared to their peers with low absence (less than 3% absence the past semester), adolescents with high absence were more likely to be in contact with all the services studied, including mental health services (odds ratio (OR) 3.96), adolescent health clinics (OR 2.11) and their general practitioner (GP) (OR 1.94). Frequency of contact was higher among adolescents with moderate and high absence and there seems to be a gradient of service use corresponding to the level of absence. Still, 40% of the adolescents with high absence had not been in contact with any services.

Conclusions: Adolescents with high absence had increased use of services, although a group of youth at risk seems to be without such contact. This finding suggests a potential to address school absenteeism through systematic collaboration between schools and health personnel.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus