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The effect of tramadol and indomethacin coadministration on gastric barrier function in dogs.

Hill TL, Lascelles BD, Law JM, Blikslager AT - J. Vet. Intern. Med. (2014)

Bottom Line: That coadministration of a nonselective NSAID (indomethacin) and tramadol would decrease recovery of barrier function as compared with acid-injured, indomethacin-treated, and tramadol-treated mucosa.Indomethacin decreased recovery of transepithelial electrical resistance after injury, although neither tramadol nor the coadministration of the two had an additional effect.These results suggest that if there is an adverse interaction of the 2 drugs in vivo, it is unlikely to be via prostanoid inhibition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

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Indomethacin and tramadol coadministration had no significant effect on recovery of TER after acid injury. N = 10, values represent mean ± SE.
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jvim12345-fig-0003: Indomethacin and tramadol coadministration had no significant effect on recovery of TER after acid injury. N = 10, values represent mean ± SE.

Mentions: Acid injury induced a significant and partially reversible decrease in barrier function as assessed by TER (Fig 1). At point of maximal acid‐induced change in barrier function, TER of mucosa treated with acid injury was 34.9 ± 5.3% of control. At 210 minutes, TER of acid‐injured tissue was 83.9 ± 9.7% of control tissue. There was an overall significant effect of treatment on TER recovery after injury (P < .001). Acid‐injured tissue treated with indomethacin after injury recovered significantly less than acid‐injured control (Fig 1, P = .034). Tramadol, with or without concurrent indomethacin administration, did not significantly affect TER recovery after injury (Figs 2 and 3). Flux of 3H‐mannitol after acid injury, with or without drug administration, was not significantly different than control (data not shown).


The effect of tramadol and indomethacin coadministration on gastric barrier function in dogs.

Hill TL, Lascelles BD, Law JM, Blikslager AT - J. Vet. Intern. Med. (2014)

Indomethacin and tramadol coadministration had no significant effect on recovery of TER after acid injury. N = 10, values represent mean ± SE.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4497006&req=5

jvim12345-fig-0003: Indomethacin and tramadol coadministration had no significant effect on recovery of TER after acid injury. N = 10, values represent mean ± SE.
Mentions: Acid injury induced a significant and partially reversible decrease in barrier function as assessed by TER (Fig 1). At point of maximal acid‐induced change in barrier function, TER of mucosa treated with acid injury was 34.9 ± 5.3% of control. At 210 minutes, TER of acid‐injured tissue was 83.9 ± 9.7% of control tissue. There was an overall significant effect of treatment on TER recovery after injury (P < .001). Acid‐injured tissue treated with indomethacin after injury recovered significantly less than acid‐injured control (Fig 1, P = .034). Tramadol, with or without concurrent indomethacin administration, did not significantly affect TER recovery after injury (Figs 2 and 3). Flux of 3H‐mannitol after acid injury, with or without drug administration, was not significantly different than control (data not shown).

Bottom Line: That coadministration of a nonselective NSAID (indomethacin) and tramadol would decrease recovery of barrier function as compared with acid-injured, indomethacin-treated, and tramadol-treated mucosa.Indomethacin decreased recovery of transepithelial electrical resistance after injury, although neither tramadol nor the coadministration of the two had an additional effect.These results suggest that if there is an adverse interaction of the 2 drugs in vivo, it is unlikely to be via prostanoid inhibition.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus