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The reliability of non-invasive biophysical outcome measures for evaluating normal and hyperkeratotic foot skin.

Hashmi F, Wright C, Nester C, Lam S - J Foot Ankle Res (2015)

Bottom Line: The surface evaluation parameters for skin: SEsc and SEsm have greater reliability compared to the SEr measure.Reviscometer® measures on callused skin demonstrated an unusually high degree of error.These results confirm the intra and inter rater reliability of the Corneometer®, Cutometer®, Visioline® and Visioscan® in quantifying specific foot skin biophysical properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, Centre for Health Sciences Research, University of Salford, Manchester, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hyperkeratosis of foot skin is a common skin problem affecting people of different ages. The clinical presentation of this condition can range from dry flaky skin, which can lead to fissures, to hard callused skin which is often painful and debilitating. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability of certain non-invasive skin measurement devices on foot skin in normal and hyperkeratotic states, with a view to confirming their use as quantitative outcome measures in future clinical trials.

Methods: Twelve healthy adult participants with a range of foot skin conditions (xerotic skin, heel fissures and plantar calluses) were recruited to the study. Measurements of normal and hyperkeratotic skin sites were taken using the following devices: Corneometer® CM 825, Cutometer® 580 MPA, Reviscometer® RVM 600, Visioline® VL 650 Quantiride® and Visioscan® VC 98, by two investigators on two consecutive days. The intra and inter rater reliability and standard error of measurement for each device was calculated.

Results: The data revealed the majority of the devices to be reliable measurement tools for normal and hyperkeratotic foot skin (ICC values > 0.6). The surface evaluation parameters for skin: SEsc and SEsm have greater reliability compared to the SEr measure. The Cutometer® is sensitive to soft tissue movement within the probe, therefore measurement of plantar soft tissue areas should be approached with caution. Reviscometer® measures on callused skin demonstrated an unusually high degree of error.

Conclusions: These results confirm the intra and inter rater reliability of the Corneometer®, Cutometer®, Visioline® and Visioscan® in quantifying specific foot skin biophysical properties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Heel fissure images. The first image is a view of the heel fissure before marking and the second is a view captured during length measurement and marking of the centre of the fissure NB: The line drawn on this diagram is used to describe how the centre of the heel fissure was identified. During testing a single dot or small cross was marked on the area to indicate the centre of the fissure
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Fig1: Heel fissure images. The first image is a view of the heel fissure before marking and the second is a view captured during length measurement and marking of the centre of the fissure NB: The line drawn on this diagram is used to describe how the centre of the heel fissure was identified. During testing a single dot or small cross was marked on the area to indicate the centre of the fissure

Mentions: The length of the heel crack was measured using a ruler and the centre of the fissure was marked using a water soluble pen (Fig. 1). In order to ensure that repeated measures could be taken at the same skin site on consecutive days, an area of skin on the plantar aspect of the heel was selected and also marked to act as a reference point. This reference point was also used as a measurement site, i.e. xerotic plantar heel skin.Fig. 1


The reliability of non-invasive biophysical outcome measures for evaluating normal and hyperkeratotic foot skin.

Hashmi F, Wright C, Nester C, Lam S - J Foot Ankle Res (2015)

Heel fissure images. The first image is a view of the heel fissure before marking and the second is a view captured during length measurement and marking of the centre of the fissure NB: The line drawn on this diagram is used to describe how the centre of the heel fissure was identified. During testing a single dot or small cross was marked on the area to indicate the centre of the fissure
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496920&req=5

Fig1: Heel fissure images. The first image is a view of the heel fissure before marking and the second is a view captured during length measurement and marking of the centre of the fissure NB: The line drawn on this diagram is used to describe how the centre of the heel fissure was identified. During testing a single dot or small cross was marked on the area to indicate the centre of the fissure
Mentions: The length of the heel crack was measured using a ruler and the centre of the fissure was marked using a water soluble pen (Fig. 1). In order to ensure that repeated measures could be taken at the same skin site on consecutive days, an area of skin on the plantar aspect of the heel was selected and also marked to act as a reference point. This reference point was also used as a measurement site, i.e. xerotic plantar heel skin.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: The surface evaluation parameters for skin: SEsc and SEsm have greater reliability compared to the SEr measure.Reviscometer® measures on callused skin demonstrated an unusually high degree of error.These results confirm the intra and inter rater reliability of the Corneometer®, Cutometer®, Visioline® and Visioscan® in quantifying specific foot skin biophysical properties.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Health Sciences, Centre for Health Sciences Research, University of Salford, Manchester, UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Hyperkeratosis of foot skin is a common skin problem affecting people of different ages. The clinical presentation of this condition can range from dry flaky skin, which can lead to fissures, to hard callused skin which is often painful and debilitating. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability of certain non-invasive skin measurement devices on foot skin in normal and hyperkeratotic states, with a view to confirming their use as quantitative outcome measures in future clinical trials.

Methods: Twelve healthy adult participants with a range of foot skin conditions (xerotic skin, heel fissures and plantar calluses) were recruited to the study. Measurements of normal and hyperkeratotic skin sites were taken using the following devices: Corneometer® CM 825, Cutometer® 580 MPA, Reviscometer® RVM 600, Visioline® VL 650 Quantiride® and Visioscan® VC 98, by two investigators on two consecutive days. The intra and inter rater reliability and standard error of measurement for each device was calculated.

Results: The data revealed the majority of the devices to be reliable measurement tools for normal and hyperkeratotic foot skin (ICC values > 0.6). The surface evaluation parameters for skin: SEsc and SEsm have greater reliability compared to the SEr measure. The Cutometer® is sensitive to soft tissue movement within the probe, therefore measurement of plantar soft tissue areas should be approached with caution. Reviscometer® measures on callused skin demonstrated an unusually high degree of error.

Conclusions: These results confirm the intra and inter rater reliability of the Corneometer®, Cutometer®, Visioline® and Visioscan® in quantifying specific foot skin biophysical properties.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus