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A survey of dental school's emergency departments in Ireland and the UK: provision of undergraduate teaching and emergency care.

Anderson S, Nunn J, Stassen LF, McLoughlin J - Br Dent J (2015)

Bottom Line: Teaching of A&E topics, and undergraduate experience, vary significantly between schools.A&E departments were diversely named and exhibited significant regional variation.Assessment of undergraduates following time in clinic is an important component of any A&E module.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dublin Dental University Hospital, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2, Ireland.

ABSTRACT

Aim: Emergency dental care is a vital service that new graduates should be prepared to offer. There are few published data relating to emergency dental care education. To assess this, and to gain a profile of accident and emergency departments (A&E) in dental schools, an online survey was sent to all of the dental schools in the Republic of Ireland and the UK.

Setting: The survey addressed the school's A&E curriculum, teaching methods, undergraduate exposure and departmental details.

Results: The majority of A&E departments operated during normal working hours with a minority offering an out-of-hours service. Teaching of A&E topics, and undergraduate experience, vary significantly between schools. A&E departments were diversely named and exhibited significant regional variation. Approximately half employed a triage system. It is unclear what represents an adequate level of undergraduate exposure, and more research is required in this area.

Conclusions: Assessment of undergraduates following time in clinic is an important component of any A&E module. We consider a reflective portfolio to represent a suitable form of assessment, and would recommend their introduction. In addition, we recommend that dental hospitals consider a nurse-led triage system.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Level of undergraduate exposure (15 respondents)
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f3: Level of undergraduate exposure (15 respondents)

Mentions: When asked about exposure to dental A&E upon graduation, 15 responses were received. No respondents reported fewer than six sessions; 20% (3/15) of schools reported six to ten sessions; 13% (2/15) reported 11–15 sessions; 33% (5/15) reported 15–20 sessions; 33% (5/15) indicated more than 20 sessions. Respondents were then asked whether the level of experience was adequate or inadequate. These data were cross-tabulated with the number of sessions (Fig. 3). Overall, 33% (5/15) felt that the level of exposure upon graduation was inadequate.


A survey of dental school's emergency departments in Ireland and the UK: provision of undergraduate teaching and emergency care.

Anderson S, Nunn J, Stassen LF, McLoughlin J - Br Dent J (2015)

Level of undergraduate exposure (15 respondents)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496797&req=5

f3: Level of undergraduate exposure (15 respondents)
Mentions: When asked about exposure to dental A&E upon graduation, 15 responses were received. No respondents reported fewer than six sessions; 20% (3/15) of schools reported six to ten sessions; 13% (2/15) reported 11–15 sessions; 33% (5/15) reported 15–20 sessions; 33% (5/15) indicated more than 20 sessions. Respondents were then asked whether the level of experience was adequate or inadequate. These data were cross-tabulated with the number of sessions (Fig. 3). Overall, 33% (5/15) felt that the level of exposure upon graduation was inadequate.

Bottom Line: Teaching of A&E topics, and undergraduate experience, vary significantly between schools.A&E departments were diversely named and exhibited significant regional variation.Assessment of undergraduates following time in clinic is an important component of any A&E module.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dublin Dental University Hospital, Lincoln Place, Dublin 2, Ireland.

ABSTRACT

Aim: Emergency dental care is a vital service that new graduates should be prepared to offer. There are few published data relating to emergency dental care education. To assess this, and to gain a profile of accident and emergency departments (A&E) in dental schools, an online survey was sent to all of the dental schools in the Republic of Ireland and the UK.

Setting: The survey addressed the school's A&E curriculum, teaching methods, undergraduate exposure and departmental details.

Results: The majority of A&E departments operated during normal working hours with a minority offering an out-of-hours service. Teaching of A&E topics, and undergraduate experience, vary significantly between schools. A&E departments were diversely named and exhibited significant regional variation. Approximately half employed a triage system. It is unclear what represents an adequate level of undergraduate exposure, and more research is required in this area.

Conclusions: Assessment of undergraduates following time in clinic is an important component of any A&E module. We consider a reflective portfolio to represent a suitable form of assessment, and would recommend their introduction. In addition, we recommend that dental hospitals consider a nurse-led triage system.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus