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Asymmetric lipid membranes: towards more realistic model systems.

Marquardt D, Geier B, Pabst G - Membranes (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition.Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Biophysics Division, University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Humboldtstr 50/III, Graz, 8010, Austria. drew.marquardt@uni-graz.at.

ABSTRACT
Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition. Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies.

No MeSH data available.


Energy profile for Chol flip/flop. The red arrow indicates that the barrier for flip/flop decreases as membrane disorder increases, as reported in [83,84].
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membranes-05-00180-f006: Energy profile for Chol flip/flop. The red arrow indicates that the barrier for flip/flop decreases as membrane disorder increases, as reported in [83,84].

Mentions: The flip/flop rates of Chol have been determined in a number of different experimental methods and by MD simulations, which have been proven very valuable due to the complexity of probe-free studies. MD studies performed by Jo et al. and Bennet et al. yielded consistent average single molecule flipping for Chol flip/flop ranging from 1.4 ms–80 ns depending on temperature and membrane composition [83,84]. The prevailing trend in these studies is that Chol flip/flop increases with membrane disorder, which decreases with temperature and unsaturated lipid content (Figure 6).


Asymmetric lipid membranes: towards more realistic model systems.

Marquardt D, Geier B, Pabst G - Membranes (Basel) (2015)

Energy profile for Chol flip/flop. The red arrow indicates that the barrier for flip/flop decreases as membrane disorder increases, as reported in [83,84].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496639&req=5

membranes-05-00180-f006: Energy profile for Chol flip/flop. The red arrow indicates that the barrier for flip/flop decreases as membrane disorder increases, as reported in [83,84].
Mentions: The flip/flop rates of Chol have been determined in a number of different experimental methods and by MD simulations, which have been proven very valuable due to the complexity of probe-free studies. MD studies performed by Jo et al. and Bennet et al. yielded consistent average single molecule flipping for Chol flip/flop ranging from 1.4 ms–80 ns depending on temperature and membrane composition [83,84]. The prevailing trend in these studies is that Chol flip/flop increases with membrane disorder, which decreases with temperature and unsaturated lipid content (Figure 6).

Bottom Line: Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition.Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Biophysics Division, University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Humboldtstr 50/III, Graz, 8010, Austria. drew.marquardt@uni-graz.at.

ABSTRACT
Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition. Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies.

No MeSH data available.