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Asymmetric lipid membranes: towards more realistic model systems.

Marquardt D, Geier B, Pabst G - Membranes (Basel) (2015)

Bottom Line: Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition.Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Biophysics Division, University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Humboldtstr 50/III, Graz, 8010, Austria. drew.marquardt@uni-graz.at.

ABSTRACT
Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition. Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies.

No MeSH data available.


Cartoon illustration of differently-shaped lipids and the associated curvature.
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membranes-05-00180-f003: Cartoon illustration of differently-shaped lipids and the associated curvature.

Mentions: A more familiar form of Equation (1) describes the shape parameter S:(2)S=Vlcaowhere is the optimum area per molecule at the lipid/water interface, V is the volume per molecule and is the length of the fully-extended acyl chain [2]. Phospholipids with a shape parameter of 1 adopt a cone-like shape, which would correspond to an area of positive curvature (Figure 3). Shape parameters that are correspond to a cylindrical shape preference, which would result in domains of neutral curvature. Finally, 1 corresponds to an inverted cone shape preference leading to negative curvatures.


Asymmetric lipid membranes: towards more realistic model systems.

Marquardt D, Geier B, Pabst G - Membranes (Basel) (2015)

Cartoon illustration of differently-shaped lipids and the associated curvature.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496639&req=5

membranes-05-00180-f003: Cartoon illustration of differently-shaped lipids and the associated curvature.
Mentions: A more familiar form of Equation (1) describes the shape parameter S:(2)S=Vlcaowhere is the optimum area per molecule at the lipid/water interface, V is the volume per molecule and is the length of the fully-extended acyl chain [2]. Phospholipids with a shape parameter of 1 adopt a cone-like shape, which would correspond to an area of positive curvature (Figure 3). Shape parameters that are correspond to a cylindrical shape preference, which would result in domains of neutral curvature. Finally, 1 corresponds to an inverted cone shape preference leading to negative curvatures.

Bottom Line: Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition.Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Biophysics Division, University of Graz, NAWI Graz, Humboldtstr 50/III, Graz, 8010, Austria. drew.marquardt@uni-graz.at.

ABSTRACT
Despite the ubiquity of transbilayer asymmetry in natural cell membranes, the vast majority of existing research has utilized chemically well-defined symmetric liposomes, where the inner and outer bilayer leaflets have the same composition. Here, we review various aspects of asymmetry in nature and in model systems in anticipation for the next phase of model membrane studies.

No MeSH data available.