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The 'Zero Tolerance Village Alliance': A promising intervention for addressing sexual and gender-based violence in rural communities

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Worldwide, few countries have higher rates of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) than South Africa... Furthermore, the issue of sexual violence in South Africa is compounded by the linkages between such violence and HIV seropositivity... Referred to as the 'Zero Tolerance Village Alliance' (ZTVA), the intervention was premised on the notion that changing SGBV norms would require the involvement of all community members (particularly men and women), and that, ultimately, a village would have to take ownership of the issue of SGBV, understand the need to ensure a 'zero-tolerance' environment against SGBV, and demonstrate motivation to have their community branded in this way... Addressing these issues would be likely to reduce levels of SGBV in communities, lessen stigma around admitting personal experiences of SGBV, and increase awareness of where to obtain care for SGBV... These components included: • a series of community dialogues to introduce and promote ownership of the ZTVA model • the appointment of a Stakeholders Forum representative of community structures and agencies (e.g., traditional authority, churches, schools, businesses, and civil society agencies), and responsible for facilitating and monitoring intervention activities • the development of a Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) outlining the criteria for a village's induction into the Zero Tolerance Village Alliance • the development of community maps to highlight opportunities for partnerships to enhance SGBV service provision, and to disseminate SGBV messages • training of Stakeholder Forum members on SGBV good governance procedures and policies, rights and responsibilities, and accountability monitoring (this training includes a 'Training of Trainers' module to ensure cascading of training to other community groups) • promoting the attainment of ZTVA criteria, including (but not limited to): • participation of at least 1,250 adults and youth per village in a series of five workshops or dialogues, covering SGBV issues and accountability monitoring • adherence of government service providers to their relevant and respective mandates (e.g., police trained in victim empowerment, clinics displaying Victim's Charter and providing male and female condoms) • existence of: a short-term, community-run safe house for victims of domestic violence; and a functioning support group for people living with HIV and orphans and vulnerable children Once the village concerned meets all the induction criteria listed above, the final aspect of the intervention involves a public ceremony during which men of the village are invited to make a public pledge to proactively address the eradication of SGBV in their village... Selected results presented in this paper center on self-reported experiences of SGBV, knowledge of where to access post-rape care services, and gender beliefs about sexual refusal in intimate partnerships... Knowledge of where to obtain this kind of care increased in the ZTVA villages (Figure 2)... This increase was statistically significant in both intervention sites... Slight increases in this regard were also observed in Tshiombo (the second ZTVA village), but these were not statistically significant... In contrast, the comparison village (Mangondi) saw a reduction in the proportion of men who believed a woman has the power to decline sexual advances from her partner... There were also reductions in the comparison village in the proportion of women and men alike who agreed (as opposed to 'strongly agreed') with this statement... None of the changes observed in the comparison village were statistically significant.

No MeSH data available.


Gender Beliefs. LF=Lunungwi females; LM=Lunungwi males; TF= Tshiombo females; TM= Tshiombo males; MF=Mangondi females; MM=Mangondi males
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Figure 3: Gender Beliefs. LF=Lunungwi females; LM=Lunungwi males; TF= Tshiombo females; TM= Tshiombo males; MF=Mangondi females; MM=Mangondi males


The 'Zero Tolerance Village Alliance': A promising intervention for addressing sexual and gender-based violence in rural communities
Gender Beliefs. LF=Lunungwi females; LM=Lunungwi males; TF= Tshiombo females; TM= Tshiombo males; MF=Mangondi females; MM=Mangondi males
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496635&req=5

Figure 3: Gender Beliefs. LF=Lunungwi females; LM=Lunungwi males; TF= Tshiombo females; TM= Tshiombo males; MF=Mangondi females; MM=Mangondi males

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Worldwide, few countries have higher rates of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) than South Africa... Furthermore, the issue of sexual violence in South Africa is compounded by the linkages between such violence and HIV seropositivity... Referred to as the 'Zero Tolerance Village Alliance' (ZTVA), the intervention was premised on the notion that changing SGBV norms would require the involvement of all community members (particularly men and women), and that, ultimately, a village would have to take ownership of the issue of SGBV, understand the need to ensure a 'zero-tolerance' environment against SGBV, and demonstrate motivation to have their community branded in this way... Addressing these issues would be likely to reduce levels of SGBV in communities, lessen stigma around admitting personal experiences of SGBV, and increase awareness of where to obtain care for SGBV... These components included: • a series of community dialogues to introduce and promote ownership of the ZTVA model • the appointment of a Stakeholders Forum representative of community structures and agencies (e.g., traditional authority, churches, schools, businesses, and civil society agencies), and responsible for facilitating and monitoring intervention activities • the development of a Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) outlining the criteria for a village's induction into the Zero Tolerance Village Alliance • the development of community maps to highlight opportunities for partnerships to enhance SGBV service provision, and to disseminate SGBV messages • training of Stakeholder Forum members on SGBV good governance procedures and policies, rights and responsibilities, and accountability monitoring (this training includes a 'Training of Trainers' module to ensure cascading of training to other community groups) • promoting the attainment of ZTVA criteria, including (but not limited to): • participation of at least 1,250 adults and youth per village in a series of five workshops or dialogues, covering SGBV issues and accountability monitoring • adherence of government service providers to their relevant and respective mandates (e.g., police trained in victim empowerment, clinics displaying Victim's Charter and providing male and female condoms) • existence of: a short-term, community-run safe house for victims of domestic violence; and a functioning support group for people living with HIV and orphans and vulnerable children Once the village concerned meets all the induction criteria listed above, the final aspect of the intervention involves a public ceremony during which men of the village are invited to make a public pledge to proactively address the eradication of SGBV in their village... Selected results presented in this paper center on self-reported experiences of SGBV, knowledge of where to access post-rape care services, and gender beliefs about sexual refusal in intimate partnerships... Knowledge of where to obtain this kind of care increased in the ZTVA villages (Figure 2)... This increase was statistically significant in both intervention sites... Slight increases in this regard were also observed in Tshiombo (the second ZTVA village), but these were not statistically significant... In contrast, the comparison village (Mangondi) saw a reduction in the proportion of men who believed a woman has the power to decline sexual advances from her partner... There were also reductions in the comparison village in the proportion of women and men alike who agreed (as opposed to 'strongly agreed') with this statement... None of the changes observed in the comparison village were statistically significant.

No MeSH data available.