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Novel paradigms to measure variability of behavior in early childhood: posture, gaze, and pupil dilation.

Hepach R, Vaish A, Tomasello M - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene.In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology.Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Leipzig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A central challenge of investigating the underlying mechanisms of and the individual differences in young children's behavior is the measurement of the internal physiological mechanism and the involved expressive emotions. Here, we illustrate two paradigms that assess concurrent indicators of both children's social perception as well as their emotional expression. In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene. In these studies, children's internal arousal is measured via changes in their pupil dilation by using eye tracking technology. In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology. Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The experimental setup of the study. Children walked toward the Kinect camera after they either experienced a positive (top) or neutral event (bottom). During the positive event children retrieved an object from the blue box that allowed them to continue an activity while in the neutral event no experimental manipulation occurred.
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Figure 6: The experimental setup of the study. Children walked toward the Kinect camera after they either experienced a positive (top) or neutral event (bottom). During the positive event children retrieved an object from the blue box that allowed them to continue an activity while in the neutral event no experimental manipulation occurred.

Mentions: In our behavioral studies with 2-year-old children, participants can move around freely in a naturalistic setting without the need to attach point-light markers to their clothes. The Kinect ‘draws’ virtual points on participants’ bodies. At specific time points during the study, the child moves toward the Kinect camera so that a full body image can be captured. In the following we provide data from one example (not reported with the original study) to illustrate that children’s experience of an event that elicits a positive emotion reflects in changes of their body posture. At the beginning of the study we carried out a baseline measure during which children walked toward the Kinect without any experimental manipulation. At a later point in the study children manipulated a box to retrieve a toy that allowed them to continue with an attractive activity. Following this event, children again walked toward the Kinect camera. We hypothesized that experiencing this positive event would increase children’s upper-body posture (see Figure 6 for an illustration).


Novel paradigms to measure variability of behavior in early childhood: posture, gaze, and pupil dilation.

Hepach R, Vaish A, Tomasello M - Front Psychol (2015)

The experimental setup of the study. Children walked toward the Kinect camera after they either experienced a positive (top) or neutral event (bottom). During the positive event children retrieved an object from the blue box that allowed them to continue an activity while in the neutral event no experimental manipulation occurred.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496555&req=5

Figure 6: The experimental setup of the study. Children walked toward the Kinect camera after they either experienced a positive (top) or neutral event (bottom). During the positive event children retrieved an object from the blue box that allowed them to continue an activity while in the neutral event no experimental manipulation occurred.
Mentions: In our behavioral studies with 2-year-old children, participants can move around freely in a naturalistic setting without the need to attach point-light markers to their clothes. The Kinect ‘draws’ virtual points on participants’ bodies. At specific time points during the study, the child moves toward the Kinect camera so that a full body image can be captured. In the following we provide data from one example (not reported with the original study) to illustrate that children’s experience of an event that elicits a positive emotion reflects in changes of their body posture. At the beginning of the study we carried out a baseline measure during which children walked toward the Kinect without any experimental manipulation. At a later point in the study children manipulated a box to retrieve a toy that allowed them to continue with an attractive activity. Following this event, children again walked toward the Kinect camera. We hypothesized that experiencing this positive event would increase children’s upper-body posture (see Figure 6 for an illustration).

Bottom Line: In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene.In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology.Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Leipzig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A central challenge of investigating the underlying mechanisms of and the individual differences in young children's behavior is the measurement of the internal physiological mechanism and the involved expressive emotions. Here, we illustrate two paradigms that assess concurrent indicators of both children's social perception as well as their emotional expression. In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene. In these studies, children's internal arousal is measured via changes in their pupil dilation by using eye tracking technology. In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology. Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus