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Novel paradigms to measure variability of behavior in early childhood: posture, gaze, and pupil dilation.

Hepach R, Vaish A, Tomasello M - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene.In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology.Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Leipzig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A central challenge of investigating the underlying mechanisms of and the individual differences in young children's behavior is the measurement of the internal physiological mechanism and the involved expressive emotions. Here, we illustrate two paradigms that assess concurrent indicators of both children's social perception as well as their emotional expression. In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene. In these studies, children's internal arousal is measured via changes in their pupil dilation by using eye tracking technology. In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology. Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results from the adult validation study. The x-axis represents the time after the emotion was elicited and as adults walked toward the Kinect. The y-axis shows the relative change in height for participants’ chest (left) and hip (right). At each time point the median for the two positive and the two negative emotions is plotted. The gray area marks the time window where the difference between the two types of emotions was statistically significant (corrected for multiple testing).
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Figure 5: Results from the adult validation study. The x-axis represents the time after the emotion was elicited and as adults walked toward the Kinect. The y-axis shows the relative change in height for participants’ chest (left) and hip (right). At each time point the median for the two positive and the two negative emotions is plotted. The gray area marks the time window where the difference between the two types of emotions was statistically significant (corrected for multiple testing).

Mentions: Adults’ change in chest height from baseline was more elevated during the positive compared to the negative emotion events immediately after the emotion manipulation, p = 0.012 (all other ps > 0.1). This was not the case when performing the identical analyses on the hip’s center (all ps > 0.06; see Figure 5). These results suggested that adults’ upper-body varies with the valence of the induced emotion. Measuring changes in upper body posture using the Kinect system can tap into the types of internal states involved in the experience and display during emotional episodes. This potentially makes the technology an interesting research tool to assess emotional expressions in young children.


Novel paradigms to measure variability of behavior in early childhood: posture, gaze, and pupil dilation.

Hepach R, Vaish A, Tomasello M - Front Psychol (2015)

Results from the adult validation study. The x-axis represents the time after the emotion was elicited and as adults walked toward the Kinect. The y-axis shows the relative change in height for participants’ chest (left) and hip (right). At each time point the median for the two positive and the two negative emotions is plotted. The gray area marks the time window where the difference between the two types of emotions was statistically significant (corrected for multiple testing).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496555&req=5

Figure 5: Results from the adult validation study. The x-axis represents the time after the emotion was elicited and as adults walked toward the Kinect. The y-axis shows the relative change in height for participants’ chest (left) and hip (right). At each time point the median for the two positive and the two negative emotions is plotted. The gray area marks the time window where the difference between the two types of emotions was statistically significant (corrected for multiple testing).
Mentions: Adults’ change in chest height from baseline was more elevated during the positive compared to the negative emotion events immediately after the emotion manipulation, p = 0.012 (all other ps > 0.1). This was not the case when performing the identical analyses on the hip’s center (all ps > 0.06; see Figure 5). These results suggested that adults’ upper-body varies with the valence of the induced emotion. Measuring changes in upper body posture using the Kinect system can tap into the types of internal states involved in the experience and display during emotional episodes. This potentially makes the technology an interesting research tool to assess emotional expressions in young children.

Bottom Line: In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene.In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology.Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Leipzig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A central challenge of investigating the underlying mechanisms of and the individual differences in young children's behavior is the measurement of the internal physiological mechanism and the involved expressive emotions. Here, we illustrate two paradigms that assess concurrent indicators of both children's social perception as well as their emotional expression. In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene. In these studies, children's internal arousal is measured via changes in their pupil dilation by using eye tracking technology. In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology. Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus