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Novel paradigms to measure variability of behavior in early childhood: posture, gaze, and pupil dilation.

Hepach R, Vaish A, Tomasello M - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene.In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology.Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Leipzig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A central challenge of investigating the underlying mechanisms of and the individual differences in young children's behavior is the measurement of the internal physiological mechanism and the involved expressive emotions. Here, we illustrate two paradigms that assess concurrent indicators of both children's social perception as well as their emotional expression. In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene. In these studies, children's internal arousal is measured via changes in their pupil dilation by using eye tracking technology. In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology. Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The general set-up of the study. While children sit in front of the computer monitor, the eye tracking unit records both their eye movements and pupil diameter before they return to the adult’s side.
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Figure 1: The general set-up of the study. While children sit in front of the computer monitor, the eye tracking unit records both their eye movements and pupil diameter before they return to the adult’s side.

Mentions: The general set-up and procedure of our studies is comparable to other developmental studies on children’s prosocial behavior, yet we include a crucial difference. At pre-defined time points, children (24-month-olds) sit in front of an apparatus that resembles the facade of a house through which they can view the scene they themselves moments ago participated in. Children watch the scene on a computer screen, which shows a live video feed of the events on the ‘other’ side of the apparatus. Through a series of familiarizations (see also Troseth and DeLoache, 1998), children learn that what they see on the screen is actually happening and that they can return to the task they were engaged in before they sat down (see Figure 1 for an illustration). In our studies, children view an adult carry out a task such as stacking cans until at one point the final object accidentally drops to the floor out of his/her reach. Children are then given the opportunity to subsequently help (see Hepach et al., 2012, for details).


Novel paradigms to measure variability of behavior in early childhood: posture, gaze, and pupil dilation.

Hepach R, Vaish A, Tomasello M - Front Psychol (2015)

The general set-up of the study. While children sit in front of the computer monitor, the eye tracking unit records both their eye movements and pupil diameter before they return to the adult’s side.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496555&req=5

Figure 1: The general set-up of the study. While children sit in front of the computer monitor, the eye tracking unit records both their eye movements and pupil diameter before they return to the adult’s side.
Mentions: The general set-up and procedure of our studies is comparable to other developmental studies on children’s prosocial behavior, yet we include a crucial difference. At pre-defined time points, children (24-month-olds) sit in front of an apparatus that resembles the facade of a house through which they can view the scene they themselves moments ago participated in. Children watch the scene on a computer screen, which shows a live video feed of the events on the ‘other’ side of the apparatus. Through a series of familiarizations (see also Troseth and DeLoache, 1998), children learn that what they see on the screen is actually happening and that they can return to the task they were engaged in before they sat down (see Figure 1 for an illustration). In our studies, children view an adult carry out a task such as stacking cans until at one point the final object accidentally drops to the floor out of his/her reach. Children are then given the opportunity to subsequently help (see Hepach et al., 2012, for details).

Bottom Line: In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene.In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology.Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Leipzig, Germany.

ABSTRACT
A central challenge of investigating the underlying mechanisms of and the individual differences in young children's behavior is the measurement of the internal physiological mechanism and the involved expressive emotions. Here, we illustrate two paradigms that assess concurrent indicators of both children's social perception as well as their emotional expression. In one set of studies, children view situations while their eye movements are mapped onto a live scene. In these studies, children's internal arousal is measured via changes in their pupil dilation by using eye tracking technology. In another set of studies, we measured children's emotional expression via changes in their upper-body posture by using depth sensor imaging technology. Together, these paradigms can provide new insights into the internal mechanism and outward emotional expression involved in young children's behavior.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus