Limits...
Emotional words can be embodied or disembodied: the role of superficial vs. deep types of processing.

Abbassi E, Blanchette I, Ansaldo AI, Ghassemzadeh H, Joanette Y - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: During superficial processing, emotional words likely make connections only with semantically associated words in the LH.Deep processing, in contrast, seems to involve conceptual information and imagery of a word's perceptual and emotional properties using autobiographical memory contents.Imagery and the involvement of autobiographical memory likely differentiate between emotional and neutral word processing and explain the salient role of the RH in emotional word processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal and Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC Canada.

ABSTRACT
Emotional words are processed rapidly and automatically in the left hemisphere (LH) and slowly, with the involvement of attention, in the right hemisphere (RH). This review aims to find the reason for this difference and suggests that emotional words can be processed superficially or deeply due to the involvement of the linguistic and imagery systems, respectively. During superficial processing, emotional words likely make connections only with semantically associated words in the LH. This part of the process is automatic and may be sufficient for the purpose of language processing. Deep processing, in contrast, seems to involve conceptual information and imagery of a word's perceptual and emotional properties using autobiographical memory contents. Imagery and the involvement of autobiographical memory likely differentiate between emotional and neutral word processing and explain the salient role of the RH in emotional word processing. It is concluded that the level of emotional word processing in the RH should be deeper than in the LH and, thus, it is conceivable that the slow mode of processing adds certain qualities to the output.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The LASS theory – linguistic and situated simulation: initial contributions from the linguistic system (L) and the situated simulation (SS) system during conceptual processing. When the cue is a word, contribution from the linguistic system precedes those from the simulation system. The height, width, shape, and offset of two distributions are not assumed to be fixed. In response to different words in different task contexts, all these parameters are expected to change (e.g., SS activity could be more intense than L activity). Thus, the two distributions in this figure illustrate one of infinitely many different forms that activations of the L and SS systems could take. Figure and legend reproduced with permission from Barsalou et al. (2008).
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Figure 1: The LASS theory – linguistic and situated simulation: initial contributions from the linguistic system (L) and the situated simulation (SS) system during conceptual processing. When the cue is a word, contribution from the linguistic system precedes those from the simulation system. The height, width, shape, and offset of two distributions are not assumed to be fixed. In response to different words in different task contexts, all these parameters are expected to change (e.g., SS activity could be more intense than L activity). Thus, the two distributions in this figure illustrate one of infinitely many different forms that activations of the L and SS systems could take. Figure and legend reproduced with permission from Barsalou et al. (2008).

Mentions: As the Figure 1 illustrates, the LASS theory holds that when a word is presented (heard or seen), both the linguistic and simulation systems become active immediately to access its meaning; however, the activation of the linguistic system peaks before that of the simulation system. The reason is probably that the linguistic forms of representation are more analogous to the perceived words than the simulation of related experiences. Barsalou et al. (2008) claimed that, although the simulation system existed long before human beings evolved, the use of the linguistic system was what caused humans to enhance their cognitive performance. It is as though the linguistic system appeared later in human development in order to control the simulation system and increase this system’s ability to represent non-present situations.


Emotional words can be embodied or disembodied: the role of superficial vs. deep types of processing.

Abbassi E, Blanchette I, Ansaldo AI, Ghassemzadeh H, Joanette Y - Front Psychol (2015)

The LASS theory – linguistic and situated simulation: initial contributions from the linguistic system (L) and the situated simulation (SS) system during conceptual processing. When the cue is a word, contribution from the linguistic system precedes those from the simulation system. The height, width, shape, and offset of two distributions are not assumed to be fixed. In response to different words in different task contexts, all these parameters are expected to change (e.g., SS activity could be more intense than L activity). Thus, the two distributions in this figure illustrate one of infinitely many different forms that activations of the L and SS systems could take. Figure and legend reproduced with permission from Barsalou et al. (2008).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496550&req=5

Figure 1: The LASS theory – linguistic and situated simulation: initial contributions from the linguistic system (L) and the situated simulation (SS) system during conceptual processing. When the cue is a word, contribution from the linguistic system precedes those from the simulation system. The height, width, shape, and offset of two distributions are not assumed to be fixed. In response to different words in different task contexts, all these parameters are expected to change (e.g., SS activity could be more intense than L activity). Thus, the two distributions in this figure illustrate one of infinitely many different forms that activations of the L and SS systems could take. Figure and legend reproduced with permission from Barsalou et al. (2008).
Mentions: As the Figure 1 illustrates, the LASS theory holds that when a word is presented (heard or seen), both the linguistic and simulation systems become active immediately to access its meaning; however, the activation of the linguistic system peaks before that of the simulation system. The reason is probably that the linguistic forms of representation are more analogous to the perceived words than the simulation of related experiences. Barsalou et al. (2008) claimed that, although the simulation system existed long before human beings evolved, the use of the linguistic system was what caused humans to enhance their cognitive performance. It is as though the linguistic system appeared later in human development in order to control the simulation system and increase this system’s ability to represent non-present situations.

Bottom Line: During superficial processing, emotional words likely make connections only with semantically associated words in the LH.Deep processing, in contrast, seems to involve conceptual information and imagery of a word's perceptual and emotional properties using autobiographical memory contents.Imagery and the involvement of autobiographical memory likely differentiate between emotional and neutral word processing and explain the salient role of the RH in emotional word processing.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre de Recherche, Institut Universitaire de Gériatrie de Montréal and Faculté de Médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC Canada.

ABSTRACT
Emotional words are processed rapidly and automatically in the left hemisphere (LH) and slowly, with the involvement of attention, in the right hemisphere (RH). This review aims to find the reason for this difference and suggests that emotional words can be processed superficially or deeply due to the involvement of the linguistic and imagery systems, respectively. During superficial processing, emotional words likely make connections only with semantically associated words in the LH. This part of the process is automatic and may be sufficient for the purpose of language processing. Deep processing, in contrast, seems to involve conceptual information and imagery of a word's perceptual and emotional properties using autobiographical memory contents. Imagery and the involvement of autobiographical memory likely differentiate between emotional and neutral word processing and explain the salient role of the RH in emotional word processing. It is concluded that the level of emotional word processing in the RH should be deeper than in the LH and, thus, it is conceivable that the slow mode of processing adds certain qualities to the output.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus