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Respiratory sensory gating measured by respiratory-related evoked potentials in generalized anxiety disorder.

Chan PY, Cheng CH, Hsu SC, Liu CY, Davenport PW, von Leupoldt A - Front Psychol (2015)

Bottom Line: However, little is known about the neural processes underlying respiratory sensory perception, especially in patient groups.The results showed a significantly greater S2/S1 ratio for the N1 component of the RREP in the GAD group compared to the control group.Our findings suggest altered respiratory sensory processing in patients with GAD, which might contribute to altered perception of respiratory sensations in these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University , Taoyuan, Taiwan ; Healthy Ageing Research Center, Chang Gung University , Taoyuan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
The perception of respiratory sensations plays an important role both in respiratory diseases and in anxiety disorders. However, little is known about the neural processes underlying respiratory sensory perception, especially in patient groups. Therefore, the present study examined whether patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) would demonstrate altered respiratory sensory gating compared to a healthy control group. Respiratory-related evoked potentials (RREP) were measured in a paired inspiratory occlusion paradigm presenting two brief occlusion stimuli (S1 and S2) within one inspiration. The results showed a significantly greater S2/S1 ratio for the N1 component of the RREP in the GAD group compared to the control group. Our findings suggest altered respiratory sensory processing in patients with GAD, which might contribute to altered perception of respiratory sensations in these patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Group averaged waveform from the C4 electrode. (A) The black solid lines represents the averaged S1 and S2 waveforms of the healthy control (HC) group (N = 18); (B) the black dashed lines represents the averaged S1 and S2 waveforms of the GAD group (N = 18).
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Figure 1: Group averaged waveform from the C4 electrode. (A) The black solid lines represents the averaged S1 and S2 waveforms of the healthy control (HC) group (N = 18); (B) the black dashed lines represents the averaged S1 and S2 waveforms of the GAD group (N = 18).

Mentions: Figure 1 shows group averaged S1 and S2 RREP waveforms of the HC group (a) and the GAD group (b). The one-way ANOVA results revealed that the GAD group showed a significantly greater N1 S2/S1 ratio compared to the HCs at both electrode sites [Figure 2; C3: 1.06 ± 0.65 and 0.58 ± 0.27, F(1,25) = 6.172, p < 0.05; C4: 1.01 ± 0.38 and 0.67 ± 0.3, F(1,32) = 8.28, p < 0.01]. Further analyses on the S1 and S2 amplitudes for N1 showed that the HC group had significantly greater S1 amplitudes compared to the GAD group at the C3 electrode [T(1,27) = 2.505, p < 0.05]; however, the independent t-test did not show a significant difference for the S1 amplitude at C4 [T(1,33) = 0.906, p > 0.05]. Similarly, the analyses on the S2 amplitudes at electrodes C3 and C4 did not show significant differences between the two groups [T(1,25) = –0.32 and T(1,32) = –0.686, respectively, p > 0.05].


Respiratory sensory gating measured by respiratory-related evoked potentials in generalized anxiety disorder.

Chan PY, Cheng CH, Hsu SC, Liu CY, Davenport PW, von Leupoldt A - Front Psychol (2015)

Group averaged waveform from the C4 electrode. (A) The black solid lines represents the averaged S1 and S2 waveforms of the healthy control (HC) group (N = 18); (B) the black dashed lines represents the averaged S1 and S2 waveforms of the GAD group (N = 18).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496549&req=5

Figure 1: Group averaged waveform from the C4 electrode. (A) The black solid lines represents the averaged S1 and S2 waveforms of the healthy control (HC) group (N = 18); (B) the black dashed lines represents the averaged S1 and S2 waveforms of the GAD group (N = 18).
Mentions: Figure 1 shows group averaged S1 and S2 RREP waveforms of the HC group (a) and the GAD group (b). The one-way ANOVA results revealed that the GAD group showed a significantly greater N1 S2/S1 ratio compared to the HCs at both electrode sites [Figure 2; C3: 1.06 ± 0.65 and 0.58 ± 0.27, F(1,25) = 6.172, p < 0.05; C4: 1.01 ± 0.38 and 0.67 ± 0.3, F(1,32) = 8.28, p < 0.01]. Further analyses on the S1 and S2 amplitudes for N1 showed that the HC group had significantly greater S1 amplitudes compared to the GAD group at the C3 electrode [T(1,27) = 2.505, p < 0.05]; however, the independent t-test did not show a significant difference for the S1 amplitude at C4 [T(1,33) = 0.906, p > 0.05]. Similarly, the analyses on the S2 amplitudes at electrodes C3 and C4 did not show significant differences between the two groups [T(1,25) = –0.32 and T(1,32) = –0.686, respectively, p > 0.05].

Bottom Line: However, little is known about the neural processes underlying respiratory sensory perception, especially in patient groups.The results showed a significantly greater S2/S1 ratio for the N1 component of the RREP in the GAD group compared to the control group.Our findings suggest altered respiratory sensory processing in patients with GAD, which might contribute to altered perception of respiratory sensations in these patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University , Taoyuan, Taiwan ; Healthy Ageing Research Center, Chang Gung University , Taoyuan, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT
The perception of respiratory sensations plays an important role both in respiratory diseases and in anxiety disorders. However, little is known about the neural processes underlying respiratory sensory perception, especially in patient groups. Therefore, the present study examined whether patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) would demonstrate altered respiratory sensory gating compared to a healthy control group. Respiratory-related evoked potentials (RREP) were measured in a paired inspiratory occlusion paradigm presenting two brief occlusion stimuli (S1 and S2) within one inspiration. The results showed a significantly greater S2/S1 ratio for the N1 component of the RREP in the GAD group compared to the control group. Our findings suggest altered respiratory sensory processing in patients with GAD, which might contribute to altered perception of respiratory sensations in these patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus