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The effects of acute hyperinsulinemia on bone metabolism.

Ivaska KK, Heliövaara MK, Ebeling P, Bucci M, Huovinen V, Väänänen HK, Nuutila P, Koistinen HA - Endocr Connect (2015)

Bottom Line: Thirty-three subjects from three separate cohorts (n=8, n=12 and n=13) participated in a euglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study.In conclusion, insulin decreases bone resorption and circulating levels of total OC and ucOC.Insulin has direct effects on bone metabolism in humans and changes in the circulating levels of bone markers can be seen within a few hours after administration of insulin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology and AnatomyInstitute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, FI-20520 Turku, FinlandDepartment of MedicineUniversity of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, FinlandTurku PET CentreUniversity of Turku, Turku, FinlandDepartment of RadiologyUniversity of Turku, Turku, FinlandMedical Imaging Centre of Southwest FinlandTurku University Hospital, Turku, FinlandDepartment of EndocrinologyTurku University Hospital, Turku, FinlandAbdominal Center: EndocrinologyUniversity of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, FinlandMinerva Foundation Institute for Medical ResearchHelsinki, Finland kaisa.ivaska@utu.fi.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

%-changes in bone markers in response to A) 4 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU/m2 per min) clamp (cohort 1), B) 4 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with high (72 mU/m2 per min) insulin infusion rate (cohort 2) or C) 2 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU/m2 per min) clamp (cohort 3). Results are shown as %-change from the baseline (0’) value. The lines inside the boxes represent the 50th percentile; the limits of the boxes represent the 25th and 75th percentiles, and the whiskers the 10th and 90th percentiles. Individual samples are shown with crosses and the mean value with a square. P values for the changes (from baseline to the endpoint, Wilcoxon signed ranks test) are shown below the x-axis (**P<0.01 and *P<0.05).
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fig2: %-changes in bone markers in response to A) 4 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU/m2 per min) clamp (cohort 1), B) 4 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with high (72 mU/m2 per min) insulin infusion rate (cohort 2) or C) 2 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU/m2 per min) clamp (cohort 3). Results are shown as %-change from the baseline (0’) value. The lines inside the boxes represent the 50th percentile; the limits of the boxes represent the 25th and 75th percentiles, and the whiskers the 10th and 90th percentiles. Individual samples are shown with crosses and the mean value with a square. P values for the changes (from baseline to the endpoint, Wilcoxon signed ranks test) are shown below the x-axis (**P<0.01 and *P<0.05).

Mentions: After 4 h insulin infusion, there was a small but significant decrease in bone resorption marker CTX (median −11%, P=0.035, Fig. 2A). High-dose insulin exposure resulted in a similar, but more pronounced suppression of bone resorption measured by CTX (median −32%, P=0.008, Fig. 2B). In contrast, shorter 2 h insulin infusion did not alter serum CTX (median+1.0%, P=0.61. Fig. 2C). Levels of osteoclast-derived TRAcP5b, a marker of osteoclast number, varied and no consistent pattern in response to insulin were observed. A small, but significant decrease of 4.6% (P=0.01) was observed in 2 h insulin exposure and a decreasing trend was observed also after the longer 4 h exposure (median −13%, P=0.05). However, no decrease was detected in TRAcP5b in cohort 2 (P=0.27). The changes in bone markers in response to insulin infusion are summarized in Fig. 2 and Supplementary Figure 1, see section on supplementary data given at the end of this article.


The effects of acute hyperinsulinemia on bone metabolism.

Ivaska KK, Heliövaara MK, Ebeling P, Bucci M, Huovinen V, Väänänen HK, Nuutila P, Koistinen HA - Endocr Connect (2015)

%-changes in bone markers in response to A) 4 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU/m2 per min) clamp (cohort 1), B) 4 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with high (72 mU/m2 per min) insulin infusion rate (cohort 2) or C) 2 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU/m2 per min) clamp (cohort 3). Results are shown as %-change from the baseline (0’) value. The lines inside the boxes represent the 50th percentile; the limits of the boxes represent the 25th and 75th percentiles, and the whiskers the 10th and 90th percentiles. Individual samples are shown with crosses and the mean value with a square. P values for the changes (from baseline to the endpoint, Wilcoxon signed ranks test) are shown below the x-axis (**P<0.01 and *P<0.05).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496528&req=5

fig2: %-changes in bone markers in response to A) 4 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU/m2 per min) clamp (cohort 1), B) 4 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp with high (72 mU/m2 per min) insulin infusion rate (cohort 2) or C) 2 h euglycemic hyperinsulinemic (40 mU/m2 per min) clamp (cohort 3). Results are shown as %-change from the baseline (0’) value. The lines inside the boxes represent the 50th percentile; the limits of the boxes represent the 25th and 75th percentiles, and the whiskers the 10th and 90th percentiles. Individual samples are shown with crosses and the mean value with a square. P values for the changes (from baseline to the endpoint, Wilcoxon signed ranks test) are shown below the x-axis (**P<0.01 and *P<0.05).
Mentions: After 4 h insulin infusion, there was a small but significant decrease in bone resorption marker CTX (median −11%, P=0.035, Fig. 2A). High-dose insulin exposure resulted in a similar, but more pronounced suppression of bone resorption measured by CTX (median −32%, P=0.008, Fig. 2B). In contrast, shorter 2 h insulin infusion did not alter serum CTX (median+1.0%, P=0.61. Fig. 2C). Levels of osteoclast-derived TRAcP5b, a marker of osteoclast number, varied and no consistent pattern in response to insulin were observed. A small, but significant decrease of 4.6% (P=0.01) was observed in 2 h insulin exposure and a decreasing trend was observed also after the longer 4 h exposure (median −13%, P=0.05). However, no decrease was detected in TRAcP5b in cohort 2 (P=0.27). The changes in bone markers in response to insulin infusion are summarized in Fig. 2 and Supplementary Figure 1, see section on supplementary data given at the end of this article.

Bottom Line: Thirty-three subjects from three separate cohorts (n=8, n=12 and n=13) participated in a euglycaemic hyperinsulinemic clamp study.In conclusion, insulin decreases bone resorption and circulating levels of total OC and ucOC.Insulin has direct effects on bone metabolism in humans and changes in the circulating levels of bone markers can be seen within a few hours after administration of insulin.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cell Biology and AnatomyInstitute of Biomedicine, University of Turku, FI-20520 Turku, FinlandDepartment of MedicineUniversity of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, FinlandTurku PET CentreUniversity of Turku, Turku, FinlandDepartment of RadiologyUniversity of Turku, Turku, FinlandMedical Imaging Centre of Southwest FinlandTurku University Hospital, Turku, FinlandDepartment of EndocrinologyTurku University Hospital, Turku, FinlandAbdominal Center: EndocrinologyUniversity of Helsinki and Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, FinlandMinerva Foundation Institute for Medical ResearchHelsinki, Finland kaisa.ivaska@utu.fi.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus