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Utility of a Three-Dimensional Interactive Augmented Reality Program for Balance and Mobility Rehabilitation in the Elderly: A Feasibility Study.

Im DJ, Ku J, Kim YJ, Cho S, Cho YK, Lim T, Lee HS, Kim HJ, Kang YJ - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Bottom Line: In this feasibility study, we assessed clinical and kinematic improvements, user participation, and the side effects of our system.Participants exhibited significant clinical improvements in lower extremity balance and mobility following the intervention, as shown by improved BBS and TUG scores (p<0.001).All participants completed the program without experiencing any adverse effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Eulji Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To improve lower extremity function and balance in elderly persons, we developed a novel, three-dimensional interactive augmented reality system (3D ARS). In this feasibility study, we assessed clinical and kinematic improvements, user participation, and the side effects of our system.

Methods: Eighteen participants (age, 56-76 years) capable of walking independently and standing on one leg were recruited. The participants received 3D ARS training during 10 sessions (30-minute duration each) for 4 weeks. Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) scores were obtained before and after the exercises. Outcome performance variables, including response time and success rate, and kinematic variables, such as hip and knee joint angle, were evaluated after each session.

Results: Participants exhibited significant clinical improvements in lower extremity balance and mobility following the intervention, as shown by improved BBS and TUG scores (p<0.001). Consistent kinematic improvements in the maximum joint angles of the hip and knee were observed across sessions. Outcome performance variables, such as success rate and response time, improved gradually across sessions, for each exercise. The level of participant interest also increased across sessions (p<0.001). All participants completed the program without experiencing any adverse effects.

Conclusion: Substantial clinical and kinematic improvements were observed after applying a novel 3D ARS training program, suggesting that this system can enhance lower extremity function and facilitate assessments of lower extremity kinematic capacity.

No MeSH data available.


Participants engaged with a three-dimensional, interactive, augmented reality rehabilitation system, comprised of the balloon game (A), the cave game (B, C), and the rhythm game (D).
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Figure 1: Participants engaged with a three-dimensional, interactive, augmented reality rehabilitation system, comprised of the balloon game (A), the cave game (B, C), and the rhythm game (D).

Mentions: Three tasks were designed to elicit specific motions with specific joints: the 'balloon game', the 'cave game', and the 'rhythm game' (Fig. 1). Each game focused on a specific exercise. For example, the balloon game encouraged hip flexion and internal and external hip rotation to touch a falling balloon; the cave game encouraged flexion and extension of the knees to avoid obstacles in a cave; and the rhythm game was designed to enhance the ability to stand on one leg by stepping on specific locations appearing on the floor.


Utility of a Three-Dimensional Interactive Augmented Reality Program for Balance and Mobility Rehabilitation in the Elderly: A Feasibility Study.

Im DJ, Ku J, Kim YJ, Cho S, Cho YK, Lim T, Lee HS, Kim HJ, Kang YJ - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Participants engaged with a three-dimensional, interactive, augmented reality rehabilitation system, comprised of the balloon game (A), the cave game (B, C), and the rhythm game (D).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496518&req=5

Figure 1: Participants engaged with a three-dimensional, interactive, augmented reality rehabilitation system, comprised of the balloon game (A), the cave game (B, C), and the rhythm game (D).
Mentions: Three tasks were designed to elicit specific motions with specific joints: the 'balloon game', the 'cave game', and the 'rhythm game' (Fig. 1). Each game focused on a specific exercise. For example, the balloon game encouraged hip flexion and internal and external hip rotation to touch a falling balloon; the cave game encouraged flexion and extension of the knees to avoid obstacles in a cave; and the rhythm game was designed to enhance the ability to stand on one leg by stepping on specific locations appearing on the floor.

Bottom Line: In this feasibility study, we assessed clinical and kinematic improvements, user participation, and the side effects of our system.Participants exhibited significant clinical improvements in lower extremity balance and mobility following the intervention, as shown by improved BBS and TUG scores (p<0.001).All participants completed the program without experiencing any adverse effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation, Eulji Hospital, Eulji University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To improve lower extremity function and balance in elderly persons, we developed a novel, three-dimensional interactive augmented reality system (3D ARS). In this feasibility study, we assessed clinical and kinematic improvements, user participation, and the side effects of our system.

Methods: Eighteen participants (age, 56-76 years) capable of walking independently and standing on one leg were recruited. The participants received 3D ARS training during 10 sessions (30-minute duration each) for 4 weeks. Berg Balance Scale (BBS) and the Timed Up and Go (TUG) scores were obtained before and after the exercises. Outcome performance variables, including response time and success rate, and kinematic variables, such as hip and knee joint angle, were evaluated after each session.

Results: Participants exhibited significant clinical improvements in lower extremity balance and mobility following the intervention, as shown by improved BBS and TUG scores (p<0.001). Consistent kinematic improvements in the maximum joint angles of the hip and knee were observed across sessions. Outcome performance variables, such as success rate and response time, improved gradually across sessions, for each exercise. The level of participant interest also increased across sessions (p<0.001). All participants completed the program without experiencing any adverse effects.

Conclusion: Substantial clinical and kinematic improvements were observed after applying a novel 3D ARS training program, suggesting that this system can enhance lower extremity function and facilitate assessments of lower extremity kinematic capacity.

No MeSH data available.