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Evaluation of Stiffness of the Spastic Lower Extremity Muscles in Early Spinal Cord Injury by Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging.

Cho KH, Nam JH - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Eighteen patients with SCI within 3 months and 10 healthy adults participated.We applied the ARFI technique to measure SWV of gastrocnemius muscle (GCM) and long head of biceps femoris muscle.ARFI imaging is a valuable tool for noninvasive assessment of the stiffness of the spastic muscle and has the potential to identify pathomechanical changes of the tissue associated with SCI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate intrinsic viscoelastic changes using shear wave velocities (SWVs) of spastic lower extremity muscles in patients with early spinal cord injury (SCI) via acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and to evaluate correlation between the SWV values and spasticity.

Methods: Eighteen patients with SCI within 3 months and 10 healthy adults participated. We applied the ARFI technique to measure SWV of gastrocnemius muscle (GCM) and long head of biceps femoris muscle. Spasticity of ankle and knee joint was assessed by original Ashworth Scale.

Results: Ten patients with SCI had spasticity. Patients with spasticity had significantly faster SWV for GCM and biceps femoris muscle than those without spasticity (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.007 and p=0.008) and normal control (p=0.011 and p=0.037, respectively). The SWV values of GCM correlated with the ankle spasticity (Spearman rank teat, p=0.026). There was significant correlation between the SWV values for long head of biceps femoris muscle and knee spasticity (Spearman rank teat, p=0.022).

Conclusion: ARFI demonstrated a difference in muscle stiffness in the GCM between patients with spastic SCI and those without spasticity. This finding suggested that stiffness of muscles increased in spastic lower extremity of early SCI patients. ARFI imaging is a valuable tool for noninvasive assessment of the stiffness of the spastic muscle and has the potential to identify pathomechanical changes of the tissue associated with SCI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Shear wave velocity (SWV) of medial gastrocnemius muscle (A) in 3 groups and the long head of biceps femoris muscle (B) in 3 groups. *p<0.05 in Mann-Whitney U test.
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Figure 2: Shear wave velocity (SWV) of medial gastrocnemius muscle (A) in 3 groups and the long head of biceps femoris muscle (B) in 3 groups. *p<0.05 in Mann-Whitney U test.

Mentions: Patients with spasticity had significantly faster SWV for GCM and BFLH than those without spasticity (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.007 and p=0.008) and normal control (p=0.011 and p=0.037, respectively) (Fig. 2). The SWVs of the GCM (1.15±0.45 m/s) and BFLH (1.43±0.76 m/s) in spastic patients was significantly higher, as compared with that of patients without spasticity (GCM, 0.66±0.08 m/s; BFLH, 0.73±0.19 m/s) and healthy subjects (GCM, 0.74±0.13 m/s; BFLH, 0.77±0.18 m/s). Interclass correlation coefficient for GCM was 0.85 and interclass correlation coefficient for BFLH was 0.79, respectively.


Evaluation of Stiffness of the Spastic Lower Extremity Muscles in Early Spinal Cord Injury by Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Imaging.

Cho KH, Nam JH - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Shear wave velocity (SWV) of medial gastrocnemius muscle (A) in 3 groups and the long head of biceps femoris muscle (B) in 3 groups. *p<0.05 in Mann-Whitney U test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496510&req=5

Figure 2: Shear wave velocity (SWV) of medial gastrocnemius muscle (A) in 3 groups and the long head of biceps femoris muscle (B) in 3 groups. *p<0.05 in Mann-Whitney U test.
Mentions: Patients with spasticity had significantly faster SWV for GCM and BFLH than those without spasticity (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.007 and p=0.008) and normal control (p=0.011 and p=0.037, respectively) (Fig. 2). The SWVs of the GCM (1.15±0.45 m/s) and BFLH (1.43±0.76 m/s) in spastic patients was significantly higher, as compared with that of patients without spasticity (GCM, 0.66±0.08 m/s; BFLH, 0.73±0.19 m/s) and healthy subjects (GCM, 0.74±0.13 m/s; BFLH, 0.77±0.18 m/s). Interclass correlation coefficient for GCM was 0.85 and interclass correlation coefficient for BFLH was 0.79, respectively.

Bottom Line: Eighteen patients with SCI within 3 months and 10 healthy adults participated.We applied the ARFI technique to measure SWV of gastrocnemius muscle (GCM) and long head of biceps femoris muscle.ARFI imaging is a valuable tool for noninvasive assessment of the stiffness of the spastic muscle and has the potential to identify pathomechanical changes of the tissue associated with SCI.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Chungnam National University School of Medicine, Daejeon, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate intrinsic viscoelastic changes using shear wave velocities (SWVs) of spastic lower extremity muscles in patients with early spinal cord injury (SCI) via acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging and to evaluate correlation between the SWV values and spasticity.

Methods: Eighteen patients with SCI within 3 months and 10 healthy adults participated. We applied the ARFI technique to measure SWV of gastrocnemius muscle (GCM) and long head of biceps femoris muscle. Spasticity of ankle and knee joint was assessed by original Ashworth Scale.

Results: Ten patients with SCI had spasticity. Patients with spasticity had significantly faster SWV for GCM and biceps femoris muscle than those without spasticity (Mann-Whitney U test, p=0.007 and p=0.008) and normal control (p=0.011 and p=0.037, respectively). The SWV values of GCM correlated with the ankle spasticity (Spearman rank teat, p=0.026). There was significant correlation between the SWV values for long head of biceps femoris muscle and knee spasticity (Spearman rank teat, p=0.022).

Conclusion: ARFI demonstrated a difference in muscle stiffness in the GCM between patients with spastic SCI and those without spasticity. This finding suggested that stiffness of muscles increased in spastic lower extremity of early SCI patients. ARFI imaging is a valuable tool for noninvasive assessment of the stiffness of the spastic muscle and has the potential to identify pathomechanical changes of the tissue associated with SCI.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus