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Efficacy of Systemic Postoperative Pulmonary Rehabilitation After Lung Resection Surgery.

Kim SK, Ahn YH, Yoon JA, Shin MJ, Chang JH, Cho JS, Lee MK, Kim MH, Yun EY, Jeong JH, Shin YB - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Bottom Line: A significant improvement on the VAS was observed in patients who received systemic PR >3 months.Significant improvements in forced vital capacity (FVC) and mBS score were observed in patients who received systemic PR >6 months (p<0.05).Other PFT results were not different compared with those in the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea. ; Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the efficacy of systemic pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) after lung resection in patients with lung cancer.

Methods: Forty-one patients undergoing lung resection were enrolled and classified into the experimental (n=31) and control groups (n=10). The experimental group underwent post-operative systemic PR which was conducted 30 min/day on every hospitalization day by an expert physical therapist. The control group received the same education about the PR exercises and were encouraged to self-exercise without supervision of the physical therapist. The PR group was taught a self-PR program and feedback was provided regularly until 6 months after surgery. We conducted pulmonary function testing (PFT) and used a visual analog scale (VAS) to evaluate pain, and the modified Borg Dyspnea Scale (mBS) to measure perceived respiratory exertion shortly before and 2 weeks, 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery.

Results: A significant improvement on the VAS was observed in patients who received systemic PR >3 months. Significant improvements in forced vital capacity (FVC) and mBS score were observed in patients who received systemic PR >6 months (p<0.05). Other PFT results were not different compared with those in the control group.

Conclusion: Patients who received lung resection suffered a significant decline in functional reserve and increases in pain and subjective dyspnea deteriorating quality of life (QoL). Systemic PR supervised by a therapist helped improve reduced pulmonary FVC and QoL and minimized discomfort during the postoperative periods in patients who underwent lung resection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Changes in (A) VAS and (B) mBS scores before and 2 weeks and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. VAS, visual analog scale; mBS, modified Borg Dyspnea Scale.
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Figure 2: Changes in (A) VAS and (B) mBS scores before and 2 weeks and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. VAS, visual analog scale; mBS, modified Borg Dyspnea Scale.

Mentions: The VAS evaluated 3 months after surgery showed difference between the experimental group and control group (VAS=1.0 [range, 0.00-2.00] vs. VAS=2.5 [range, 1.75-3.25]; p=0.014). The systemic PR group showed more significant improvement on the VAS compared with that of the control group 6 months after surgery (VAS=0.0 [range, 0.00-1.00] vs. VAS=2.0 [range, 1.00-2.25]; p=0.004) (Table 3, Fig. 2).


Efficacy of Systemic Postoperative Pulmonary Rehabilitation After Lung Resection Surgery.

Kim SK, Ahn YH, Yoon JA, Shin MJ, Chang JH, Cho JS, Lee MK, Kim MH, Yun EY, Jeong JH, Shin YB - Ann Rehabil Med (2015)

Changes in (A) VAS and (B) mBS scores before and 2 weeks and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. VAS, visual analog scale; mBS, modified Borg Dyspnea Scale.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4496507&req=5

Figure 2: Changes in (A) VAS and (B) mBS scores before and 2 weeks and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. VAS, visual analog scale; mBS, modified Borg Dyspnea Scale.
Mentions: The VAS evaluated 3 months after surgery showed difference between the experimental group and control group (VAS=1.0 [range, 0.00-2.00] vs. VAS=2.5 [range, 1.75-3.25]; p=0.014). The systemic PR group showed more significant improvement on the VAS compared with that of the control group 6 months after surgery (VAS=0.0 [range, 0.00-1.00] vs. VAS=2.0 [range, 1.00-2.25]; p=0.004) (Table 3, Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: A significant improvement on the VAS was observed in patients who received systemic PR >3 months.Significant improvements in forced vital capacity (FVC) and mBS score were observed in patients who received systemic PR >6 months (p<0.05).Other PFT results were not different compared with those in the control group.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan, Korea. ; Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To investigate the efficacy of systemic pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) after lung resection in patients with lung cancer.

Methods: Forty-one patients undergoing lung resection were enrolled and classified into the experimental (n=31) and control groups (n=10). The experimental group underwent post-operative systemic PR which was conducted 30 min/day on every hospitalization day by an expert physical therapist. The control group received the same education about the PR exercises and were encouraged to self-exercise without supervision of the physical therapist. The PR group was taught a self-PR program and feedback was provided regularly until 6 months after surgery. We conducted pulmonary function testing (PFT) and used a visual analog scale (VAS) to evaluate pain, and the modified Borg Dyspnea Scale (mBS) to measure perceived respiratory exertion shortly before and 2 weeks, 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery.

Results: A significant improvement on the VAS was observed in patients who received systemic PR >3 months. Significant improvements in forced vital capacity (FVC) and mBS score were observed in patients who received systemic PR >6 months (p<0.05). Other PFT results were not different compared with those in the control group.

Conclusion: Patients who received lung resection suffered a significant decline in functional reserve and increases in pain and subjective dyspnea deteriorating quality of life (QoL). Systemic PR supervised by a therapist helped improve reduced pulmonary FVC and QoL and minimized discomfort during the postoperative periods in patients who underwent lung resection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus